461011084656485855.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
y The Earthborn single work   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Is part of Earthborn Wars Trilogy Paul Collins 2003 series - author novel (number 1 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 2003 2003
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When the spaceship Colony is forced to abort its mission to colonize Tau Ceti III and instead crash lands on Earth, it's homecoming for fourteen-year-old Welkin Quinn. Well... sort of. Welkin is a skyborn. Having lived his entire life on board a spaceship, his only memories of his home planet is what he has studied from the Colony archives. Believing the Earthborn no better than animals, the Skyborn elders decide to exterminate them before recolonizing Earth. On a reconnaissance mission, however, Welkin is ambushed by a gang known as Jabbers. Rescued by a rival gang of teenaged survivors, Welkin realizes he needs the help of these Earthborn to survive. The question is, do they need him?' Source: author's website.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

      • Publisher: Tor
      New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Tor , 2003 .
      461011084656485855.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 240p.
      ISBN: 0765303078

Works about this Work

The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
SF Files Jason Nahrung , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 19 - 20 March 2005; (p. 7)
What is Australian Science Fiction? Lucy Cleary , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: The Specusphere , 16 October 2005;
'What is Australian SF? By examining recent publications, and surveying key members of the publishing industry, I hoped to determine whether Australia does indeed produce works with uniquely Australian characteristics; for example, peculiarities of language and expression, Australian attitudes, Australian settings and characters, and current Australian issues'.
Untitled Lynne Babbage , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 48 no. 2 2004; (p. 21)

— Review of The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Untitled Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Spring vol. 11 no. 3 2003; (p. 43-44)

— Review of The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Science Fiction Jeff Popple , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Canberra Sunday Times , 14 December 2003; (p. 19)

— Review of Elsewhere : An Anthology of Incredible Places 2003 anthology short story ; The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Untitled Lesley Boon , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 17 no. 3 2003; (p. 19)

— Review of The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Untitled Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Spring vol. 11 no. 3 2003; (p. 43-44)

— Review of The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Science Fiction Jeff Popple , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Canberra Sunday Times , 14 December 2003; (p. 19)

— Review of Elsewhere : An Anthology of Incredible Places 2003 anthology short story ; The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Untitled Lesley Boon , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 17 no. 3 2003; (p. 19)

— Review of The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
Untitled Lynne Babbage , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , May vol. 48 no. 2 2004; (p. 21)

— Review of The Earthborn Paul Collins 2003 single work novel
SF Files Jason Nahrung , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 19 - 20 March 2005; (p. 7)
What is Australian Science Fiction? Lucy Cleary , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: The Specusphere , 16 October 2005;
'What is Australian SF? By examining recent publications, and surveying key members of the publishing industry, I hoped to determine whether Australia does indeed produce works with uniquely Australian characteristics; for example, peculiarities of language and expression, Australian attitudes, Australian settings and characters, and current Australian issues'.
The Perfect Place to Set a Novel about the End of the World? Trends in Australian Post-Nuclear Fiction for Young Adults Elizabeth Braithwaite , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 53 no. 2 2015; (p. 22-29)
'"Australia has a fascinating yet contradictory nuclear history," writes Jeffrey Lantis, and this ambiguity can be seen in the post-nuclear young adult fiction produced in that country. British, American and German speculative fiction for young readers set after nuclear disaster tends to suggest reasons for the disaster, and by implication, to position readers towards acting to stop the disaster happening in the real world. By contrast, Australian writers of both fantasy and speculative fiction tend to be less concerned with the cause of the disaster than with how the nuclear apocalypse can be used to explore a range of cultural issues which may appear to have little or nothing to do with nuclear disaster. Working with the notion of apocalypse as both revelation and, more popularly, as a violent "end event" (Curtis), this paper explores why young adult post-nuclear fiction produced in Australia tends to be different from that produced in Britain, the USA and Germany, and demonstrates how the nuclear disaster is used in a selection of Australian young adult post-disaster fiction to address cultural issues, particularly those dealing with Australia's Indigenous population, and with the contemporary treatment of refugees.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 19 Jun 2014 13:35:19
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