360896711859918291.jpg
Source: Amazon
y Shadows Bite single work   novel   horror   fantasy  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Something is amiss in Los Angeles. A body vanishes from the morgue. The errant son of L.A.'s most notorious necromancer has unleashed demons that not even his father can control. Women hungry for more than love are suddenly appearing among the vampire wannabes at the Crypt, a local goth cafe. And a yakuza boss has put a contract out on stuntman Charlie Takumo's friend Michelangelo "Mage" Magistrale, seeking vengeance - and a magical key that unlocks enormous power.

The two friends' plight deepens when they're thrust into the middle of a series of mysterious nocturnal deaths that suddenly plague the City of Angels. Caught between professional assassins and ancient terrors that are undead and stalking the L.A. nightlife, they'll need all of Takumo's fighting skills and Mage's magic if they want to survive to see the dawn' (publisher's blurb)

Notes

  • Sequel to Art of Arrow Cutting

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: Shadowsbite
      • Publisher: Tor
      New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Tor , 2001 .
      360896711859918291.jpg
      Source: Amazon
      Extent: 334p.
      Note/s:
      • Cover title: Shadowsbite
      ISBN: 0312877838

Works about this Work

The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Scares in the Suburbs Rod Moran , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 31 May 2003; (p. 15)
In Short : Fiction Debra Adelaide , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 21-22 June 2003; (p. 19)

— Review of Taste : Fresh New Writing : UTS Writers' Anthology 2003 anthology poetry short story essay ; Shadows Bite Stephen Dedman 2001 single work novel
In Short : Fiction Debra Adelaide , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 21-22 June 2003; (p. 19)

— Review of Taste : Fresh New Writing : UTS Writers' Anthology 2003 anthology poetry short story essay ; Shadows Bite Stephen Dedman 2001 single work novel
Scares in the Suburbs Rod Moran , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 31 May 2003; (p. 15)
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Last amended 21 Oct 2016 15:22:08
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