221010536986837062.jpg
Image courtesy of Publisher website
y Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland single work   oral history   prose  
Note: Photographer: Sharon D'Amico
Issue Details: First known date: 2002 2002
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'This book welcomes us into the country, culture, lives and stories of the Mak Mak clan (the white breasted sea eagle people). In Deborah Bird Rose's writing and Sharon D'Amico's photography, we meet five extraordinary clan women: Nancy Daiyi, Kathy Deveraux, Margaret Daiyi, April Bright and Linda Ford. They share their world with us, their family, their laughter and their passion for country. In learning something of the ecology and sacred geography of the clan's homeland, we are prompted to enlarge our own country, wherever our homeland may be.' (Source: Back cover)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also electronic resource

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Aboriginal Studies Press , 2002 .
      Extent: xvi, 240p.p.
      Description: illus., maps, ports.
      Note/s:
      • Includes index and bibliography.
      • Photography by Sharon D'Amico.
      ISBN: 085575396X
    • Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Aboriginal Studies Press , 2011 .
      221010536986837062.jpg
      Image courtesy of Publisher website
      Extent: xiii,161p.
      Edition info: 2nd Edition.
      Description: col. illus., ports.,maps,geneal. table
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliographical references and index.
      • Photographs by Sharon D'Amico.
      ISBN: 9780855757762 pbk.

Works about this Work

Fire Was in the Reptile’s Mouth : Towards a Transcultural Ecological Poetics Stuart Cooke , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Landscapes , vol. 7 no. 1 2016;
'This paper compares two creation narratives from indigenous peoples on either side of the Pacific Ocean, the relationships between which catalyse the theorisation of a transcultural approach to ecological poetics. The comparison of these narratives reveals important, rhizomatic similarities, and also unmistakable regional differences, concerning the origins of language and culture in Yanomami (Venezuela) and MakMak (Australia) communities. Concomitant with the centrality of indigenous thought in this theorisation of ecopoetics is the de­centrality of human-only conceptions of poetics. Accordingly, the paper considers non-semantic forms of poetics such as birdsong in order to de-centre classically Western, humanist conceptions of language and ecology.' (Publication abstract)
Image of Publication Peer Reviewed Full Content Available Bookmark and Share More Information about This Publication Country of the Heart: An Indigenous Australian Homeland [Book Review] Murray Garde , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , December vol. 38 no. 2014; (p. 192)

— Review of Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose
Decade-Old Book Gets a Makeover 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 7 September no. 509 2011; (p. 61)

— Review of Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose
Book Focuses on the MakMak 2003 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 23 April no. 299 2003; (p. 30)
Croc Songs and Dragonflies Join Life's Rhythm Up North Debra Jopson , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24-25 May 2003; (p. 6)
You Can Hear the Wind Talk Susan Kurosawa , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 April 2003; (p. 14-15)

— Review of Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose
Untitled Stella Wilkie , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Muse , June no. 229 2003; (p. 16)

— Review of Into the No Zone Tim Metcalf 2003 selected work poetry ; Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose ; Jesus in Kashmir : poems John Leonard 2003 selected work poetry
You Can Hear the Wind Talk Susan Kurosawa , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 26-27 April 2003; (p. 14-15)

— Review of Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose
Untitled Stella Wilkie , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Muse , June no. 229 2003; (p. 16)

— Review of Into the No Zone Tim Metcalf 2003 selected work poetry ; Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose ; Jesus in Kashmir : poems John Leonard 2003 selected work poetry
Decade-Old Book Gets a Makeover 2011 single work review
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 7 September no. 509 2011; (p. 61)

— Review of Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose
Image of Publication Peer Reviewed Full Content Available Bookmark and Share More Information about This Publication Country of the Heart: An Indigenous Australian Homeland [Book Review] Murray Garde , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Aboriginal History , December vol. 38 no. 2014; (p. 192)

— Review of Country of the Heart : An Indigenous Australian Homeland Deborah Bird Rose 2002 single work oral history prose
Book Focuses on the MakMak 2003 single work column
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 23 April no. 299 2003; (p. 30)
Croc Songs and Dragonflies Join Life's Rhythm Up North Debra Jopson , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 24-25 May 2003; (p. 6)
Fire Was in the Reptile’s Mouth : Towards a Transcultural Ecological Poetics Stuart Cooke , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Landscapes , vol. 7 no. 1 2016;
'This paper compares two creation narratives from indigenous peoples on either side of the Pacific Ocean, the relationships between which catalyse the theorisation of a transcultural approach to ecological poetics. The comparison of these narratives reveals important, rhizomatic similarities, and also unmistakable regional differences, concerning the origins of language and culture in Yanomami (Venezuela) and MakMak (Australia) communities. Concomitant with the centrality of indigenous thought in this theorisation of ecopoetics is the de­centrality of human-only conceptions of poetics. Accordingly, the paper considers non-semantic forms of poetics such as birdsong in order to de-centre classically Western, humanist conceptions of language and ecology.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 15 Jan 2014 15:40:47
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