y Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers single work   autobiography  
Issue Details: First known date: 2002 2002
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'In 1965, 29 students from Sydney University set out on a road trip through northwestern NSW, to challenge the ingrained discrimination and racism that was a largely unacknowledged feature of NSW country towns. The trip was marked by confrontation, intense street debates, some physical violence and much courage from local Aborigines.' (Source: LibrariesAustralia)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2002 .
      Extent: xxii, 329p.p.
      Description: illus., map, ports.
      Note/s:
      • Includes index and a bibliography (pp.313-316).
      ISBN: 1864489227

Works about this Work

White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
The Freedom Ride Ann Curthoys , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Greats 2008; (p. 134-138)
Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers - Clive Moore Clive Moore , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Journal of Politics and History , vol. 51 no. 1 2005; (p. 133-134)

— Review of Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers Ann Curthoys 2002 single work autobiography
Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers David Andrew Roberts , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 2 2003; (p. 112-114)

— Review of Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers Ann Curthoys 2002 single work autobiography
Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers David Andrew Roberts , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 2 2003; (p. 112-114)

— Review of Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers Ann Curthoys 2002 single work autobiography
Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers - Clive Moore Clive Moore , 2005 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Journal of Politics and History , vol. 51 no. 1 2005; (p. 133-134)

— Review of Freedom Ride : A Freedom Rider Remembers Ann Curthoys 2002 single work autobiography
The Freedom Ride Ann Curthoys , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Greats 2008; (p. 134-138)
White Closets, Jangling Nerves and the Biopolitics of the Public Secret Fiona Probyn , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 57-75)
'This essay attempts to outline the relationship between the 'raw nerves' that Denis Byrne describes in the epigraph above, and the cultivation of 'indifference' that Stanner identifies as being characteristic of 'European life' in Australia. Here I situate indifference as numbing the 'jangling' of 'raw nerves' and as cultivated, disseminated and feeding specific forms of public secrecy. How did the white men who enforces segregation by day and pursued Aboriginal women by night manage their 'jangling nerves, if indeed they did jangle? How did they manage to be seen and known and have their secrets kept for them, as much as by them. How did this contradiction of segregation and sexual intimacy, if indeed it is a contradiction, work, My hope is that if we can understand how the white men (and those around them), regulated these jangling nerves, then we might be able to understand the relationship between indifference, public secrecy and the biopolitical forms that Australian whiteness took in the twentieth century, and specifically in the period of assimilation, extending from the 1930s to, roughly, the end of the 1960s.' (Author's introduction p. 57)
Last amended 18 Feb 2011 18:41:18
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