6423277729091243371.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
8501650036322156719.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
790713854609869463.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Under the Skin single work   novel   mystery   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 2000 2000
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Isserley is a female driver who picks up hitchhikers with big muscles. She, herself, is tiny, peering child-like over the steering wheel. Scarred and awkward, yet strangely erotic and threatening, she hears passengers reveal who might miss them if they should disappear.' (Publication summary)

Adaptations

form y Under the Skin Walter Campbell , Michel Faber , Jonathan Glazer , United Kingdom (UK) : Film4 British Film Institute Silver Reel , 2013 7792586 2013 single work film/TV science fiction

'A mysterious woman seduces lonely men in the evening hours in Scotland. Events lead her to begin a process of self-discovery.' (Production summary)

Notes

  • Sound recording available
  • Large print available

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Harcourt , 2000 .
      8501650036322156719.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 311p.
      ISBN: 0151006261
    • Edinburgh,
      c
      Scotland,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Canongate , 2000 .
      6423277729091243371.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 296p.
      ISBN: 1841950947
    • Edinburgh,
      c
      Scotland,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Canongate , 2004 .
      790713854609869463.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 296p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 3 March 2004
      ISBN: 1841954802
Alternative title: Die Weltenwanderin
Language: German

Works about this Work

Eating One’s Friends : Fiction as Argument in Bioethics Tod Chambers , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Medicine , Spring vol. 34 no. 1 2016; (p. 79-105)

'In this essay, I argue that literature has been profoundly misunderstood by scholars of bioethics.

'Bioethicists in analyzing moral problems have often drawn upon literary texts as sources for “rich cases,” for they have long recognized that the traditional genre of the ethics case was limited in its portrayal of the complexity of the moral landscape of actual medical practice. This traditional utilization of literature in bioethics is critically examined by James Terry and Peter Williams in an essay published in Literature and Medicine: “Short stories and poems that are evocative, complex, and imaginatively challenging have been used to supplement or supplant the traditional case study as instruments for raising ethical issues. At best, these literary works more vividly present moral questions and even raise some kinds of issues that case studies leave out.” The real purpose of Terry and Williams’s essay is to sound an alarm on this casual, unreflective use of literature: while literary works may at first appear to furnish desirable descriptions of moral problems, they caution, these texts and bioethics cases have distinct, and at times divergent, goals.' (Publication abstract)

“It’s a Question of Words, Therefore” : Becoming-Animal in Michel Faber’s Under the Skin Sarah Dillon , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Science Fiction Studies , March vol. 38 no. 1 2011; (p. 134-154)
'This essay reads Michel Faber's debut novel Under the Skin (2000) in the context of contemporary philosophical and literary-critical debates about the ethical relation between human and nonhuman animals. It argues that Faber's text engages with, but deconstructs, the traditional division of "no language, no subjectivity" by a heretical act of renaming human beings as "vodsels," and by an extensive process of figurative transformation. The paper then proceeds to a sustained analysis of the main character in the novel, Isserley, in the light of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's theories of becoming-animal, the anomalous, and becoming-molecular. The paper concludes that the novel engages in the limitrophy—Derrida's neologism—required to negotiate the abyssal limit between the human and nonhuman animal.' (Editor's abstract)
Of Humans, Pigs, Fish, and Apes: The Literary Motif of Human-Animal Metamorphosis and Its Multiple Functions in Contemporary Fiction Marion Gymnich , Alexandre Segao Costa , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Esprit Createur , Summer vol. 46 no. 2 2006; (p. 68-88)
Untitled Jenny Doubt , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die 2006; (p. 896)

— Review of Under the Skin Michel Faber 2000 single work novel
Untitled Jenny Doubt , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die 2006; (p. 896)

— Review of Under the Skin Michel Faber 2000 single work novel
Of Humans, Pigs, Fish, and Apes: The Literary Motif of Human-Animal Metamorphosis and Its Multiple Functions in Contemporary Fiction Marion Gymnich , Alexandre Segao Costa , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Esprit Createur , Summer vol. 46 no. 2 2006; (p. 68-88)
“It’s a Question of Words, Therefore” : Becoming-Animal in Michel Faber’s Under the Skin Sarah Dillon , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Science Fiction Studies , March vol. 38 no. 1 2011; (p. 134-154)
'This essay reads Michel Faber's debut novel Under the Skin (2000) in the context of contemporary philosophical and literary-critical debates about the ethical relation between human and nonhuman animals. It argues that Faber's text engages with, but deconstructs, the traditional division of "no language, no subjectivity" by a heretical act of renaming human beings as "vodsels," and by an extensive process of figurative transformation. The paper then proceeds to a sustained analysis of the main character in the novel, Isserley, in the light of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's theories of becoming-animal, the anomalous, and becoming-molecular. The paper concludes that the novel engages in the limitrophy—Derrida's neologism—required to negotiate the abyssal limit between the human and nonhuman animal.' (Editor's abstract)
Eating One’s Friends : Fiction as Argument in Bioethics Tod Chambers , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Medicine , Spring vol. 34 no. 1 2016; (p. 79-105)

'In this essay, I argue that literature has been profoundly misunderstood by scholars of bioethics.

'Bioethicists in analyzing moral problems have often drawn upon literary texts as sources for “rich cases,” for they have long recognized that the traditional genre of the ethics case was limited in its portrayal of the complexity of the moral landscape of actual medical practice. This traditional utilization of literature in bioethics is critically examined by James Terry and Peter Williams in an essay published in Literature and Medicine: “Short stories and poems that are evocative, complex, and imaginatively challenging have been used to supplement or supplant the traditional case study as instruments for raising ethical issues. At best, these literary works more vividly present moral questions and even raise some kinds of issues that case studies leave out.” The real purpose of Terry and Williams’s essay is to sound an alarm on this casual, unreflective use of literature: while literary works may at first appear to furnish desirable descriptions of moral problems, they caution, these texts and bioethics cases have distinct, and at times divergent, goals.' (Publication abstract)

Last amended 16 Aug 2016 16:17:38
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