4904456200761813985.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
Alternative title: The Two Worlds of Jimmie Barker : The Life of an Australian Aboriginal, 1900-1972
Issue Details: First known date: 1977 1977
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Autobiography; life at Mundiwa, Milroy and Brewarrina Mission; Muruwari myths, beliefs, hunting and fishing; working conditions and treatment by townspeople and managers; policies of Aborigines Protection Board; place name and linguistic information for Muruwari and Ngiyampaa.' (Source: On-line)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Dougal Kennedy, my grandson and Jimmie's friend. J.M.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.
  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Canberra, Australian Capital Territory,: Aboriginal Studies Press , 1988 .
      5658508637112791375.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: xiv, 221p.p.
      Edition info: Rev. ed.
      Description: illus., map on endpapers, [3] leaves of plates, ports
      ISBN: 0855752033

Works about this Work

Consultation and Critique: Implementing Cultural Protocols in the Reading of Collaborative Indigenous Life Writing Michael Jacklin , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Indigenous Biography and Autobiography 2008; (p. 135-145)
In this paper Jacklin argues that the reading of Indigenous life narratives by non-Indigenous academics and their subsequently published reviews and critiques of Indigenous life writing could benefit from the acknowledgement and implementation of Indigenous cultural protocols. Literary studies, Jacklin suggests, may be resistant to the notion that publishing commentary and interpretation of another's life narrative sets in motion an exchange whose consequences may exceed the printed page. Yet, as numerous Indigenous writers have asserted, consultation is a basic principle underlying any ethical exchange between non-Indigenous writers and Indigenous people. Jacklin outlines some of the gains made and complexities encountered in the processes of consultation that guided his PhD research into collaboratively produced Indigenous life writing in both Australia and Canada.
y Cross Talk : Collaborative Indigenous Life Writing in Australia and Canada Michael Jacklin , 2004 Z1351079 2004 single work thesis This thesis provides a comparative analysis of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts produced in Australia and Canada. Drawing on the large body of Indigenous life writing texts produced in both countries, the critical and theoretical literature surrounding these texts, and twenty-nine interviews conducted during the course of research with participants in Aboriginal and First Nations collaborative life writing, the author argues that literary criticism needs to take into account the co-operative basis of textual production as well as the constraining factors that shape the outcome of collaborative texts. Further, he argues for the importance of non-Indigenous critics acknowledging the centrality of Indigenous protocols in both the production and reception of collaborative Indigenous life writing. The thesis is based upon the premise that readers and producers of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts can and should talk to each other and that each group can benefit from such cross talk.
Collaboration and Resistance in Indigenous Life Writing Michael Jacklin , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian-Canadian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1 2002; (p. 27-45)
Compares life narratives of Australian and Canadian Indigenous groups.
Collaboration and Resistance in Indigenous Life Writing Michael Jacklin , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian-Canadian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1 2002; (p. 27-45)
Compares life narratives of Australian and Canadian Indigenous groups.
y Cross Talk : Collaborative Indigenous Life Writing in Australia and Canada Michael Jacklin , 2004 Z1351079 2004 single work thesis This thesis provides a comparative analysis of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts produced in Australia and Canada. Drawing on the large body of Indigenous life writing texts produced in both countries, the critical and theoretical literature surrounding these texts, and twenty-nine interviews conducted during the course of research with participants in Aboriginal and First Nations collaborative life writing, the author argues that literary criticism needs to take into account the co-operative basis of textual production as well as the constraining factors that shape the outcome of collaborative texts. Further, he argues for the importance of non-Indigenous critics acknowledging the centrality of Indigenous protocols in both the production and reception of collaborative Indigenous life writing. The thesis is based upon the premise that readers and producers of collaborative Indigenous life writing texts can and should talk to each other and that each group can benefit from such cross talk.
Consultation and Critique: Implementing Cultural Protocols in the Reading of Collaborative Indigenous Life Writing Michael Jacklin , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Indigenous Biography and Autobiography 2008; (p. 135-145)
In this paper Jacklin argues that the reading of Indigenous life narratives by non-Indigenous academics and their subsequently published reviews and critiques of Indigenous life writing could benefit from the acknowledgement and implementation of Indigenous cultural protocols. Literary studies, Jacklin suggests, may be resistant to the notion that publishing commentary and interpretation of another's life narrative sets in motion an exchange whose consequences may exceed the printed page. Yet, as numerous Indigenous writers have asserted, consultation is a basic principle underlying any ethical exchange between non-Indigenous writers and Indigenous people. Jacklin outlines some of the gains made and complexities encountered in the processes of consultation that guided his PhD research into collaboratively produced Indigenous life writing in both Australia and Canada.
Last amended 17 Jun 2015 12:07:17
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