1961822055194919913.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
1756063992134324998.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
8481520078584138805.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
6630992433434628335.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Journey to the Stone Country single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 2002 2002
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Betrayed by her husband, Annabelle Beck retreats from Melbourne to her old family home in tropical North Queensland where she meets Bo Rennie, one of the Jangga tribe. Intrigued by Bo's claim that he holds the key to her future, Annabelle sets out with him on a path of recovery that leads back to her childhood and into the Jangga's ancient heartland, where their grandparents' lives begin to yield secrets that will challenge the possibility of their happiness together.' - Publisher's blurb.

Notes

  • Featured by the BIG Book Club, an initiative supported by The Advertiser in partnership with Arts SA, The Australia Council for the Arts, Channel 7 and FIVEAA to promote a love of reading, discussion and literature, October 2003.
  • Dedication: To Stephanie, and to the real Bo and Annabelle, whose story this is.
  • Epigraph: 'A ruling class always remains slightly barbaric' (Robert Musil).
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.
  • Other formats: Also large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2002 .
      1756063992134324998.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 364p.
      Edition info: 2nd Edition, 2003.
      ISBN: 1865086193
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Sceptre , 2002 .
      1961822055194919913.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 364p.
      ISBN: 0340766913
    • Allen and Unwin , 2003 .
      8481520078584138805.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 364p.
      ISBN: 174114146X (pbk)
    • Crows Nest, North Sydney - Lane Cove area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Allen and Unwin , 2013 .
      6630992433434628335.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 372p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 15 November 2013
Alternative title: Potovanje v kamnito dezelo
Language: Slovenian
    • Dob pri Domzalah,
      c
      Slovenia,
      c
      c
      Ex Yugoslavia,
      c
      Eastern Europe, Europe,
      :
      Miš , 2007 .
      6158703083628888848.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 414p.
      Note/s:
      • Series: Zbirka Srebrne niti
      ISBN: 9789616630320 9616630326

Works about this Work

Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country Morag Fraser , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 381 2016; (p. 34-37)
y Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country Bruce Pattinson , Seven Hills : Five Senses Education , 2016 10101424 2016 single work criticism
y White Apology and Apologia : Australian Novels of Reconciliation Liliana Zavaglia , Amherst : Cambria Press , 2016 10291354 2016 multi chapter work criticism

'This book takes as its subject a body of recent fiction by white liberal writers produced in the wake of the profound cultural, political and legal transformations that have taken place in the field of Indigenous rights since the 1990s. Two milestones of this period are the High Court of Australia’s Mabo ruling on June 3, 1992, and the Rudd Labor Government’s national Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples on February 13, 2008. The novels explored in this study are Alex Miller’s Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007), Andrew McGahan’s The White Earth (2004), Kate Grenville’s The Secret River (2005) and Gail Jones’ Sorry (2007). Each of these novels was written in the period between 2002 and 2007. These were the years when the Indigenous rights and reconciliation movements had all but disappeared from the national political agenda through the interventions of the Howard Liberal Government. These works attempted to counter these silences as acts of literary activism, which strived to reignite the politically stalled processes of reconciliation. Through the medium of fiction, they kept Indigenous justice issues before the reading public, provoking discussion and stirring debate.

'White Apology and Apologia engages in close readings of the Mabo ruling, the national Apology and this body of fiction as a form of cultural history, which reflects important aspects of black/white relations in the past twenty-five years. Together, these legal, political and literary texts reveal a tension that arguably came to define this period. This tension fluctuates between a reconciliatory impulse of sorrow for Indigenous loss and the defensive desire to offer exits for white culture from the ongoing demands of a violent settlement history. Taking shape as twinned register of white longing, this conflicted cultural drive is the focus of this study.

'Each of these novels has had a significant reception and impact. All were shortlisted by the Miles Franklin Award with two taking out the coveted prize. While much critical attention has been given to their fictional explorations of reconciliation and the colonial past, this is the first study to focus on the novels as a collection of cultural artefacts from a brief but remarkable time in Australia’s recent history. In their attempts to explore Indigenous loss and dispossession, the novels can be seen as complex literary engagements with issues of the greatest moment in the contemporary public sphere. Together, they provide a significant snapshot of an ambivalent postcolonial culture in flux.

'Through an exploration of these important documents and texts of reconciliation, this study is able to offer symptomatic close readings of Australian liberal whiteness in the process of coming to terms with its troubling history. Providing new insights into how legal, historical, political, and literary discourses can influence each other in the quest for justice, White Apology and Apologia attempts to understand the relation between Australian literature and the culture that produced it. In the process it reveals the riven state of Australian postcolonial whiteness itself, which has been transformed by the legal, political and cultural shifts of the 1990s, yet which paradoxically resists its own deconstructions even as it longs for the dismantling of its own hegemony. The double movement of apology and apologia explored in this timely and important study is a startling reminder of the unresolved nature of the traumatized colonial legacy bequeathed to Australian settler culture by its history, and which continues to accompany white liberal discourse in its quest to heal its relations with the other.

'White Apology and Apologia is an important book for Australian literary and cultural studies collections.'

Source: Publisher's blurb.

Book Clubs and Reconciliation : A Pilot Study on Book Clubs Reading the ‘Fictions of Reconciliation’ Robert Clarke , Marguerite Nolan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Humanities Review , May no. 56 2014;
Place and Property in Post-Mabo Fiction by Dorothy Hewett, Alex Miller and Andrew McGahan Kieran Dolin , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'Drawing on concepts developed in legal geography and critical histories of property law, this paper considers the connection between legal and affective relations to place in white Australian fiction in the wake of the Mabo decision. In what ways does land ownership, and the rights accorded by property, influence attitudes to and understandings of place? To what extent might the Anglo-Australian law of property be inflected by Indigenous understandings of land and law? Three novels published in the years following the Wik Peoples case are examined, Dorothy Hewett's Neap Tide, Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country and Andrew McGahan's The White Earth, due to their overt engagement with post-Mabo law and politics. Through a study of fictional techniques, especially representations of race, space and law, the paper explores whether these novels contribute to the formation of a new understanding of land and justice in contemporary Australia.' (Publication abstract)
An Ecocritical Interpretation of Home Consciousness in Journey to the Stone Country Du Yanping , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , December no. 1 2014; (p. 220-229)
The Swinging Stirrup Iron : Murder Most Pastoral in Queensland Fiction Geoff Rodoreda , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 5 no. 1 2014;

In the brief massacre scene at the end of David Malouf’s 1993 novel Remembering Babylon an unusual weapon of frontier murder is introduced to Australian narrative prose: the swinging stirrup iron. In Alex Miller’s 2002 novel, Journey to the Stone Country, the stirrup iron returns to wreak even more murderous havoc. The stirrup iron functions here to provide a symbolic link to the particularities of violence in colonial Queensland, for it specifically connects the iconic national figure of the cattleman/drover with the killing of Aboriginal people on the frontier. This article examines these texts, and, more briefly, other representations of the Australian cattleman in contemporary Queensland fiction, against a backdrop of recent historical research that reconfigures cattle and their human managers as central to the story of frontier murder and the stealing of Aboriginal land that constituted the colonisation of large parts of Australia, especially of Queensland, in the latter half of the nineteenth century.

Listening to Alex Miller's Soundscapes Joseph Cummins , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 2 2013;
'Australian novelist Alex Miller’s two novels, Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007), present journeys into a web of interconnected northern Queensland landscapes. Sound is a vital aspect of these landscapes. Listening to the sounds and silences of these novels opens up imaginative, post-colonial geographies, Australian landscapes that exceed the horizons of colonial vision. This paper deploys a critical listening practice that seeks to listen to how Miller’s soundscapes construct the relations that resonate between his characters, and between the characters and the sonic landscape. Listening to the central relationships of the two novels, I argue that these relationships unfold within the resonance of the sounds and silences of Miller’s landscapes. His characters are located in a soundscape that extends the dimensions of the visual landscape: through sound and listening the human/human and human/landscape relations in the novels exceed the spatiality and temporality that has traditionally, silently, produced the self/other structure of colonial mastery.' (Author's abstract)
Disestablished Worlds : An Introduction to the Novels of Alex Miller Robert Dixon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 1-28)
The Mask of Fiction : A Memoir Alex Miller , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 29-41)
'I've been asked for a memoir for this occasion yet I am uncomfortable writing directly about myself. I prefer the mask of fiction. In this preference it is self-deception I fear most, for who but the self-deceived would claim to be able to write with moral detachment about themselves? I am also cautious of the fate of WB Yeats, the poet, of whom Richard Ellmann wrote, 'The autobiographical muse enticed him only to betray him, abandoning him to ultimate perplexity as to the meaning of his experiences' (Yeats, 2). Memoir does not offer us a sure means for contacting the deeper dualities of the self. For his journey to the heart of darkness, fiction is a more certain, if more oblique , way.' (Author's introduction)
Alex Miller and Leo Tolstoy : Australian Storytelling in a European Tradition Brenda Walker , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 42-54)
'Alex Miller may be Australia's greatest living writer. I certainly believe this to be the case. I base my view on the depth and range of his narrative preoccupations. He writes about love but his lovers often come from very different cultural backgrounds, and this illuminates what is foundational in love while respecting diversity in the most intimate of human connections. He writes with scrupulousness about the human complications of invasion, massacre and armed conflict. The American novelist Philip Roth writes that art is concerned with nuance, and politics cannot afford nuance (I Married a Communist, 223). Nuance is the most welcome and apparent characteristic of Miller understanding of the politics of territorial dispossession. He writes, also, about art and literature as cultural forces and as imperatives within the lives of individuals. In all his fiction, he is both a great writer and a great thinker. This chapter offers a much more brief appreciation of his work and thought then I would wish, more brief than it deserves. In it, I plan to consider Alex Miller and Tolstoy: both great writers, both great thinkers, especially on matters of love and war.' (Author's introduction 42)
'My Memory has a Mind of Its Own' : Watching the Climbers on the Mountain and The Tivington Nott Peter Pierce , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 55-65)
'Not long ago, Alex Miller remarked at a literary event (my witness is a bookseller from Launceston) that 'My memory has a mind of its own'. What might this mean? Perhaps a memory that is truant, given to reinvention, but also set free. Another implication might concern the double insecurity of memory: the tenuousness of our hold on what we can recollect from the past, and the uncertain hold that memory gives us on our present. In any event, that remark by Miller began and then informs this discussion of the first two novels that he wrote, works that draw closely on some salient events of his youth. They are Watching the Climbers on the Mountain (1988) and The Tivington Nott (1989)...' (From author's introduction 55)
Continental Heartlands and Alex Miller’s Geosophical Imaginary Elizabeth McMahon , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 125-138)
This chapter examines 'how the alignment between geography and subjectivity operates in four of Miller's novels to identify his refiguration of the inherited map of modern identities.' (125)
McMahon focuses on The Ancestor Game (1992), Conditions of Faith (2000), Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007).
Personal Perspectives on the Central Queensland Novels Anita Heiss , Elizabeth Hatte , Frank Budby , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 139-155)
'This chapter is a transcript of a panel session chaired by Anita Heiss at the Sydney symposium, The Novels of Alex Miller, on 13-14 May 2011. The participants were Lix Hatte (Northern Archaelogy Consulting), Colin McLennan (Elder, Jangga) (not present) and Frank Budby (Elder, Barada)'. (139)
The Frontier Wars : History and Fiction in Journey to the Stone Country and Landscape of Farewell Shirley Walker , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 156-169)
'There are some stories that must be told lest 'none be left to think of them and shed a tear' (Miller, Landscape, 12). The stories Alex Miller is concerned with in Journey to the Stone Country (2002) and Landscape of Farewell (2007) are those of the Aboriginal massacres which accompanied the invasion of Australia. But he also remind us, in Landscape of Farewell, of all such episodes of mass murder, including the Holocaust, but going back through history to the Trojan Wars and beyond. (Author's introduction 156)
Old Testament Prophets and New Testament Saviours : Reading Retribution and Forgiveness towards Whiteness in Alex Miller’s Journey to the Stone Country Liliana Zavaglia , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 170-186)
'In Journey to the Stone Country (2002), Alex Miller explores a national history in a regional setting, mapping a literary path towards reconciliation between black and white on what we may consider - and what he himself has described - as a place sacred to both Indigenous and European dreaming ('Sweet Water', 104). Yet Journey to the Stone Country is not only a literary journey. Contained within the literary of Miller's intricately drawn fictional world is the literal, the lived experiences of the character's real-life counterparts, whose stories inform the reconciliatory movements of the novel.' (From author's introduction 170)
Dougald's Goat : Alex Miller and the Species Barrier David Brooks , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 187-200)
'I would like to open with a proposition, a theory if you like, that, in a great many narratives , there is a place, a site, where they confess, or at least pay some acknowledgement to, the stories they have not followed in order to follow the story that they have. Their roadkil, one might facetiously term it, their rejectamenta, their abject. And it is not just stories, it is concepts as well, even or perhaps especially ethical positions: places, sites, where they acknowledge all that has had to be set aside in order for those stories, concepts and ethical positions to come to be. I do not say that they in any way specify or itemise them, or that this acknowledgement is anything but the vaguest symbolisation - indeed, it is so much a matter of the subconscious that it is hard to see how it could be - although in some cases they can take a pronounced and almost indisputable form. In one of the bold philosophical projects of which I sometimes dream, I would in fact go further and attempt to demonstrate a collateral premise that much of our human ethics are based upon a separation from and rejection - abjection is a better term, since this is a matter of our identity and what we do to shore it - of the animal, and that the animal therefore always haunts, unacknowledged, our ethical reflections. Miller's texts, I suggest, are ethical reflections, and so are haunted in this way.' (Author's introduction 187)
The Ruin of Time and the Temporality of Belonging : Journey to the Stone Country and Landscape of Farewell Brigid Rooney , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Novels of Alex Miller : An Introduction 2012; (p. 201-216)
'At first glance, Landscape of Farewell (2007) appears a simpler, more streamlined story than its predecessor, Journey to the Stone Country (2002). In the first person, Max Otto, a widowed German professor specialising in the history of massacres, tells of his journey to Mount Nebo in Central Queensland, a journey precipitated by his encounter with visiting Aboriginal Australian academic Vita McLelland. His journey is conducted in the context of his not yet assuaged grief for his wife, and of his haunted suspicions about his father's complicity in the horrors of wartime Germany. Peter Pierce (2004) has identified some of Miller's enduring preoccupations: 'solitariness', 'artful evocations of the visceral', tensions between ancestry, freedom and exile, and the indeterminacy of memory. While many of these recur in Landscape, I focus in this paper on how the theme of time is exercised in this novel, with its spare but concentrated prose and apparently straightforward narration. How does Landscape of Farewell draw us inwards as well as onwards, into an intricately nested set of temporalities that speak to selfhood, truth and reparation, to cross-cultural translation, to mortality and relinquishment, and to the intractable terrain of moral debate about the past? What does Miller's mode of narration bring to familiar questions, in Australian culture, of place and belonging?' (Source: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/australian_literature/images/content/conferences/miller_abstracts2.pdf)
Our Stories 2012 selected work extract
— Appears in: Writing Queensland , October no. 223 2012; (p. 6-7)
The Final Word on a Dream of Native Title Trent Dalton , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 10 - 11 November 2012; (p. 8)
'Five years ago, with his native title claim on 20,000sq km of central Queensland perched on a legal knife edge, Col McLennan presented Federal Court judge Steven Rares with a copy of celebrated novelist Alex Miller's 2003 Miles Franklin Award-winning novel, Journey to the Stone Country. "Read it," encouraged Mr McLennan, the 60-year-old patriarch to 3000 Jangga people from the bendy scrub and sacred stone country an hour west of Mackay. The book was the literary equivalent of a native title connection report, with a lead character, the enigmatic and unforgettable Bo Rennie, drawn entirely from Mr McLennan's life and deep love of country. And it proved to be a deciding factor in the realisation of a 20-year native title dream beset by bureaucracy, clan differences and endless negotiations.' Trent Dalton.
Feature Review Paul Genoni , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: JAS Review of Books , June no. 16 2003;

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Books Lucy Sussex , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 October 2003; (p. 9)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Nerve and Trust Alan Gould , 2004 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , November vol. 48 no. 11 2004; (p. 89-91)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Parable of Roads Taken Michael Sharkey , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 28-29 September 2002; (p. 10)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Elusive Beauties Peter Pierce , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 245 2002; (p. 48-49)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Hope in a Type of Hell A. P. Riemer , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 19 October 2002; (p. 8)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Affair of the Heartland Peter Pierce , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 15 October vol. 120 no. 6346 2002; (p. 73)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Loving and the Land Anne Partlon , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 26 October 2002; (p. 16)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
The Past's Power Over the Present Gillian Fulcher , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 2 November 2002; (p. 16)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Finding Future in Past Katharine England , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 16 November 2002; (p. 11)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Slabs of Butter, Layers of History Andrea Stretton , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 16-17 November 2002; (p. 12)

— Review of Journey to the Stone Country Alex Miller 2002 single work novel
Miller Wins Top Literary Award for Second Time Jennifer Moran , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 June 2003; (p. 3)
Lie of the Land Proves No Hindrance to Author Susan Wyndham , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13 June 2003; (p. 3)
Writer Finds More Miles to Go Bernard Lane , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 13 June 2003; (p. 3)
Miller Takes Literary Prize 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The West Australian , 13 June 2003; (p. 13)
The Miller's Tale Bernard Lane , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 14-15 June 2003; (p. 25)
'Gift' of a Story Wins Top Literary Award Lucy Clark , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 13 June 2003; (p. 9)
Vast Centre at Heart of Literary Win Rosemary Sorensen , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 13 June 2003; (p. 5)
Pilgrim's Progress Jason Steger , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 22 June 2003; (p. 10)
Small Town Boy Becomes Literary Giant Peter Hackett , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 4 October 2003; (p. 46)
A column about The Big Book Club's October 2003 reading selection - Alex Miller's Journey to the Stone Country.
A Journey Within Samela Harris , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 25 October 2003; (p. 3)
Sweet Water Alex Miller , 2003-2004 single work essay
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 16 December - 13 January vol. 121 no. 6403 2003-2004; (p. 100-104)
Miller's novel Journey to the Stone Country is set in the Urannah Valley in Northern Queensland, this valley is under threat from a project to dam the waters of the valley. Miller argues that the preservation of the Urannah Valley is important to our Australian identity, our civilisation, and to the acknowledgement of cultural differences. He also argues that fiction is relevant in discussions of the important issues facing our society as it "explores the individual's relationship to the great moral questions of the day."
One Book One Brisbane 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 7 February 2004; (p. 6)
The Solitariness of Alex Miller Peter Pierce , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 3 2004; (p. 299-311)
The article presents an overview of Alex Miller's literary career and development as a writer and examines his six novels published to date.
The Miller's Tale Jane Sullivan , 2005 single work biography
— Appears in: The Age , 5 November 2005; (p. 26-27)
Forging Heritage for the Tourist Gaze : Australian history and contemporary representations reviewed Agnes Vogler , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , no. 91 2007; (p. 93-106, notes 189-190)
'This essay argues that tourist culture has continued and refocused postcolonial debates about power over historical representations. I further suggest that Australian literature on the subject of tourism offers a platform from which to contest historical perspectives and review not only accounts of past events, but contemporary representations a well' (93).
A Haunted Land John McLaren , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 20 no. 1&2 2005; (p. 139-153)
'Since the nineteenth century, Australian art and writing has had a double vision of the country, as a sunny land of opportunity, and as a place of loneliness and loss. [...] Recent fiction by white writers has, like Lawson, shown an awareness of the strangeness of the land, but it locates this strangeness more directly in the brutality and defeats of settlement. The sufferings of both settlers and of those they violently displaced continue to haunt their successors' (139). The paper examines the nature of this haunting in recent novels by white Australian writers.
'This is Dog Country': Reading off Coetzee in Alex Miller's 'Journey to the Stone Country' Julie Mullaney , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Text , vol. 4 no. 3 2008;
This article explores how Alex Miller excavates the terrain of the animal mined by JM Coetzee in Disgrace, to reconsider Australian belongings post-Mabo. It distinguishes Miller's interventions from Coetzee's, while noting that Coetzee's animals are part of a wider consideration of the limits of the sympathetic imagination in encountering alterity, with peculiar resonances in Australian locations post-Mabo. Miller's novel encapsulates some of the challenges in reconfiguring Australian belongings across difference by facing the intractability of difference in Australian locations. His dogs suggest the deleterious effects of a particular mode of occupation peculiar to pastoralism, while his wild bulls denote a more elusive form of habitation, attuned to the contingencies of place post-Mabo, but formed out of the traumatic rememory of the hidden histories of pastoralism. Dogs and cattle are linked in Miller's work too in the focus on the nature of the appeal the suffering animal makes to the human. Miller is, I argue, still preoccupied by the animal as a repository of allegory and metaphor, and by the various historical resonances of the animal as an index of indigeneity. This means that his configuration of the animal risks repeating as well as illustrating settler tropes of the indigene as animal striating colonial racism. His modulation of the idea of the sacrificial animal or scapegoat to configure pastoralism in its dying throes foregrounds how the failure or exhaustion of one mode of engagement can facilitate the beginnings of a more ethically directed encounter with alterity. -- Author's abstract
'At-Home' Two-Ways : Negotiating the Sacred in the Pastoral Zone Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 165-204)
Who Gives a Figes for Orlando? Jason Steger , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 1 May 2010; (p. 31)
A column canvassing current literary news including a report on Alex Miller's talk at a 'One Town, One Townsville' event and notice of publishing director's James Fraser's departure from Pan Macmillan.
Settler Post-Colonialism and Australian Literary Culture Anna Johnston , Alan Lawson , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 28-40)
'This essay begins by mapping the place of settler postcolonialism in postcolonial studies, and its relevance to the Australian context. It then moves to demonstrate the applicability of settler postcolonial reading practices for Australian texts and contexts through two paradigmatic tropes: land and textuality.' Source: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory (2010)
Last amended 25 May 2016 12:52:37
X