Supreme Court Gardens single work   poetry   "The benches were empty today,"
Issue Details: First known date: 2000 2000
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Those Who Remain Will Always Remember : An Anthology of Aboriginal Writing Anne Brewster (editor), Angeline O'Neill (editor), Rosemary van den Berg (editor), Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 2000 Z339537 2000 anthology poetry prose biography essay short story life story autobiography biography interview non-fiction essay prose Indigenous story (taught in 4 units)

    'Culture and identity, suffering and the triumph of survival thread their way through the short stories, poems, legends, song lyrics, essays and commentaries in this... anthology of Aboriginal writing.

    Representing a range of regional and cultural differences, age groups and social circumstances, it is a testimony to the importance of the past in the construction of a better future.' Source: Publisher's blurb

    Fremantle : Fremantle Press , 2000
    pg. 120

Works about this Work

Poetry, Justice & the Court John Kinsella , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Activist Poetics : Anarchy in the Avon Valley 2010; (p. 163-175)
y Poetry as Means of Dialogue in Court Spaces John Kinsella , Z1672800 2007 single work criticism 'I've always thought 'court talk' is poetic at its best, and that we should work collectively toward valuing it as poetry, as I will explain shortly. Poetry can be extremely inclusive, and a court house with poetry literally on the walls (and as part of the walls) or displayed in other ways (sound sculptures, free standing pieces), and certainly as a poetics of architecture (we might use Bachelard's 'poetics of space' as one of many points of departure here) is one that welcomes people to dialogue, and also reflect (and inflect) internally. To my mind, such a process helps make 'justice'. Lead by example rather than simply fix the problems: it's the recognition of the private within the public.' Source: John Kinsella
y Poetry as Means of Dialogue in Court Spaces John Kinsella , Z1672800 2007 single work criticism 'I've always thought 'court talk' is poetic at its best, and that we should work collectively toward valuing it as poetry, as I will explain shortly. Poetry can be extremely inclusive, and a court house with poetry literally on the walls (and as part of the walls) or displayed in other ways (sound sculptures, free standing pieces), and certainly as a poetics of architecture (we might use Bachelard's 'poetics of space' as one of many points of departure here) is one that welcomes people to dialogue, and also reflect (and inflect) internally. To my mind, such a process helps make 'justice'. Lead by example rather than simply fix the problems: it's the recognition of the private within the public.' Source: John Kinsella
Poetry, Justice & the Court John Kinsella , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Activist Poetics : Anarchy in the Avon Valley 2010; (p. 163-175)
Last amended 21 Oct 2009 16:18:44
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