y The Legend of the Nineties multi chapter work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1954 1954
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Melbourne, Victoria,: Melbourne University Press , 1954 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Bushman's Bible, Vance Palmer , 1954 single work criticism (p. 88-108)
Literature Emerges, Vance Palmer , 1954 single work criticism (p. 109-117)
A Lost Tradition?, Vance Palmer , 1954 single work criticism (p. 167-173)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

National Literatures, Scale and the Problem of the World Robert Dixon , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'One of the leading figures in world literature today is the Harvard scholar David Damrosch. His 2003 book What is World Literature? has been widely influential, and might be said to have established the new, US-centred field of study known as world literature. In a 2010 review of three later books edited or co-edited by Damrosch—How to Read World Literature (2009), Teaching World Literature (2009) and The Longman Anthology of World Literature (2009)—John M. Kopper describes them as Damrosch’s aleph. The reference, which I take to be ironic, is to the title story of Jorge Luis Borges’s collection, The Aleph (1949). The aleph is a mysterious gadget that apparently allows the narrator, who is also named ‘Borges,’ briefly to experience an all-encompassing vision of the universe. It is a parable about the madness of desiring a total or ‘encyclopedic vision’ (Echevarria 125). To describe world literature as Damrosch’s aleph is to imply that it is fundamentally misguided to seek a total vision of literature or to read books at the scale of the world. ‘If the aleph stands for the totality of literature,’ Kopper writes, then today’s rich and expanding bibliography of works about that immensity, along with the increasingly massive anthologies that seek to encircle it, show that we have lost our fear of the unbounded object that we study’ (408). ' (Author's introduction)
Country and Lives : Australian Biography and Its History Melanie Nolan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cercles , no. 35 2015;
'There have been attempts to relate national characteristics “by reference to climate, habitat and soil and investing the collective subject with psychological attributes” for over two millennia. More recently historians of modern nationalism developed elaborate typologies often citing Martin Heidegger’s arguments that “the being of the human finds its essence in the being of place — the belonging together of being and topos” [MALPAS 2012 : 5-6]. And yet the challenge to the ontological connection between self and place, what Jeff Malpas describes as the “topological analysis of self and identity”, has a long philosophical tradition, too. This debate over experience, biography and nation has implications for historians who have raised empirical questions about the development of collective sensibilities over time among recent emigrant peoples, their physical peculiarities, behaviourial quirks and emergent national character. In this paper I consider the role that biography writing played in the construction of an Australian national identity geared to what Pierre Nora famously termed as the “roman national”, or the collective discourse on the history of the nation and its place in the world. I argue that Australian historians played a significant role in the history of biograpy writing and, related to it, the debate over collective Australian identity.' (Introduction)
Relationships to the Bush in Nan Chauncy’s Early Novels for Children Susan Sheridan , Emma Maguire , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'In the 1950s, bush settings were strong favourites for children’s novels, which often took the form of a generic mix of adventure story and bildungsroman, novel of individual development. In using bush settings to take up the environmental concerns of the period, the early novels of Wrightson and Chauncy added a new dimension to traditional settler images of rural life as central to Australian national identity. The bush is loved for its beauty and revered as a source of knowledge and character building, rather than being represented as an antagonist which must be overcome or domesticated. In this respect, Chauncy in particular anticipates later ecological concerns in writing for children.' (Publication abstract)
The Federation of Letters : A Faild Partnership in Australian Literary and Political History Brian Matthews , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Tapestry of the Creative Word in Anglophone Literatures 2013; (p. 265-272)
Legendary Australians The Legend and the Legacy Tom Sigley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Writing Across the Continent 2008;
A Patriotic Book D.M. , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 150 1998; (p. 47)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Palmer and Ward on the Gold Rush Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition 1988; (p. 95-98)
Forms of Australian Literary History Peter Pierce , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 13 no. 4 1988; (p. 77-90)
Untitled J. Harley , 1985 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Historical Society of Victoria , vol. 56 no. 2 1985; (p. 52-54)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled F. Howard , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 30 July 1983; (p. 12)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled C. Wesley , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Papers and Proceedings. Tasmanian Historical Research Association , vol. 30 no. 1983; (p. 129-130)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Australian National Identity : Rectifying an All-Male Perspective Hazel Rowley , 1980 single work criticism
— Appears in: Second Women and Labour Conference : Papers 1980; (p. 518-531)
The Time Was Never Ripe : Some Reflections on Literary Nationalism John Barnes , 1979 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , December vol. 24 no. 4 1979; (p. 35-44)
Untitled E. C. Fry , 1956 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , no. 1 1956; (p. 50-51)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Australian Myth -- Fact or Myth? H. J. Oliver , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 16 no. 3 1955; (p. 174-175)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Ian Turner , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 3 1955; (p. 20-21)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled J. M. Ward , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society , vol. 41 no. 1955; (p. 94-95)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Gay Nineties Seem Just a Day-Dream Roger Covell , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 15 May 1954; (p. 2)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Nineties W. A. Amiet , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Daily Mercury , 26 June 1954; (p. 2)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
A Patriotic Book D.M. , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 1 1954; (p. 13)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Gay Nineties Seem Just a Day-Dream Roger Covell , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 15 May 1954; (p. 2)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Nineties W. A. Amiet , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Daily Mercury , 26 June 1954; (p. 2)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
A Patriotic Book D.M. , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 1 1954; (p. 13)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Myth Australia or the Nostalgic Lovers 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 1 September vol. 75 no. 3890 1954; (p. 2,30)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Legend of our 1890s A. D. Hope , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 19 June 1954; (p. 11)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Legend of the Nineties Frederick T. Macartney , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 13 no. 4 1954; (p. 600-602)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled R.J.B. , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Voice , July 1954; (p. 25,30)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Legend of the Nineties Ian Robertson , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Summer vol. 13 no. 4 1954; (p. 602-604)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Scrutarius , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Walkabout , vol. 20 no. 9 1954; (p. 46)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Russel Ward , 1954 single work review
— Appears in: Historical Studies Australia and New Zealand , vol. 6 no. 1954; (p. 352-354)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
The Australian Myth -- Fact or Myth? H. J. Oliver , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 16 no. 3 1955; (p. 174-175)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled Ian Turner , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 3 1955; (p. 20-21)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled J. M. Ward , 1955 single work review
— Appears in: Journal and Proceedings of the Royal Australian Historical Society , vol. 41 no. 1955; (p. 94-95)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled E. C. Fry , 1956 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , no. 1 1956; (p. 50-51)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled F. Howard , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 30 July 1983; (p. 12)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled C. Wesley , 1983 single work review
— Appears in: Papers and Proceedings. Tasmanian Historical Research Association , vol. 30 no. 1983; (p. 129-130)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Untitled J. Harley , 1985 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Historical Society of Victoria , vol. 56 no. 2 1985; (p. 52-54)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
A Patriotic Book D.M. , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Autumn no. 150 1998; (p. 47)

— Review of The Legend of the Nineties Vance Palmer 1954 multi chapter work criticism
Palmer and Ward on the Gold Rush Kay Schaffer , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Women and the Bush : Forces of Desire in the Australian Cultural Tradition 1988; (p. 95-98)
Legendary Australians The Legend and the Legacy Tom Sigley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Writing Across the Continent 2008;
Australian National Identity : Rectifying an All-Male Perspective Hazel Rowley , 1980 single work criticism
— Appears in: Second Women and Labour Conference : Papers 1980; (p. 518-531)
The Time Was Never Ripe : Some Reflections on Literary Nationalism John Barnes , 1979 single work criticism
— Appears in: Westerly , December vol. 24 no. 4 1979; (p. 35-44)
Forms of Australian Literary History Peter Pierce , 1988 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 13 no. 4 1988; (p. 77-90)
Relationships to the Bush in Nan Chauncy’s Early Novels for Children Susan Sheridan , Emma Maguire , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'In the 1950s, bush settings were strong favourites for children’s novels, which often took the form of a generic mix of adventure story and bildungsroman, novel of individual development. In using bush settings to take up the environmental concerns of the period, the early novels of Wrightson and Chauncy added a new dimension to traditional settler images of rural life as central to Australian national identity. The bush is loved for its beauty and revered as a source of knowledge and character building, rather than being represented as an antagonist which must be overcome or domesticated. In this respect, Chauncy in particular anticipates later ecological concerns in writing for children.' (Publication abstract)
The Federation of Letters : A Faild Partnership in Australian Literary and Political History Brian Matthews , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Tapestry of the Creative Word in Anglophone Literatures 2013; (p. 265-272)
National Literatures, Scale and the Problem of the World Robert Dixon , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;
'One of the leading figures in world literature today is the Harvard scholar David Damrosch. His 2003 book What is World Literature? has been widely influential, and might be said to have established the new, US-centred field of study known as world literature. In a 2010 review of three later books edited or co-edited by Damrosch—How to Read World Literature (2009), Teaching World Literature (2009) and The Longman Anthology of World Literature (2009)—John M. Kopper describes them as Damrosch’s aleph. The reference, which I take to be ironic, is to the title story of Jorge Luis Borges’s collection, The Aleph (1949). The aleph is a mysterious gadget that apparently allows the narrator, who is also named ‘Borges,’ briefly to experience an all-encompassing vision of the universe. It is a parable about the madness of desiring a total or ‘encyclopedic vision’ (Echevarria 125). To describe world literature as Damrosch’s aleph is to imply that it is fundamentally misguided to seek a total vision of literature or to read books at the scale of the world. ‘If the aleph stands for the totality of literature,’ Kopper writes, then today’s rich and expanding bibliography of works about that immensity, along with the increasingly massive anthologies that seek to encircle it, show that we have lost our fear of the unbounded object that we study’ (408). ' (Author's introduction)
Country and Lives : Australian Biography and Its History Melanie Nolan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Cercles , no. 35 2015;
'There have been attempts to relate national characteristics “by reference to climate, habitat and soil and investing the collective subject with psychological attributes” for over two millennia. More recently historians of modern nationalism developed elaborate typologies often citing Martin Heidegger’s arguments that “the being of the human finds its essence in the being of place — the belonging together of being and topos” [MALPAS 2012 : 5-6]. And yet the challenge to the ontological connection between self and place, what Jeff Malpas describes as the “topological analysis of self and identity”, has a long philosophical tradition, too. This debate over experience, biography and nation has implications for historians who have raised empirical questions about the development of collective sensibilities over time among recent emigrant peoples, their physical peculiarities, behaviourial quirks and emergent national character. In this paper I consider the role that biography writing played in the construction of an Australian national identity geared to what Pierre Nora famously termed as the “roman national”, or the collective discourse on the history of the nation and its place in the world. I argue that Australian historians played a significant role in the history of biograpy writing and, related to it, the debate over collective Australian identity.' (Introduction)
Last amended 19 Apr 2007 14:13:23
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