Issue Details: First known date: 2002 2002
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Notes

  • Includes sections on: Writing Fiction, Kinds of Fiction, Writing Poetry, To Bear in Mind, Publication. Contents indexed selectively.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,: Halstead Press , 2002 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Structuring the Story, Marion Halligan , 2002 single work criticism (p. 18-22)
The Sentence in Time, Kevin Brophy , 2002 single work criticism (p. 29-35)
Voice, Glenda Adams , 2002 single work criticism (p. 36-42)
Character, Marele Day , 2002 single work criticism (p. 53-57)
The Narrator and Narrative Modes in the Novel, Antoni Jach , 2002 single work criticism (p. 58-66)
Point of View : An Introduction to Fiction Writers, Anthony Macris , 2002 single work criticism (p. 67-79)
Writing Genre, Jean Bedford , 2002 single work criticism (p. 83-93)
Autobiography, Heather Wearne , 2002 single work criticism (p. 94-103)
Historical Fiction, Delia Falconer , 2002 single work criticism (p. 104-110)
Popular Fiction, Alan Gold , 2002 single work criticism (p. 111-116)
Science Fiction and Fantasy, Van Ikin , 2002 single work criticism (p. 117-124)
The Fall : Fictocritical Writing, Stephen Muecke , 2002 single work criticism (p. 125-131)
Structuring the Poem, Marcella Polain , 2002 single work criticism (p. 135-141)
One Pleasure of Hell : Drafting and Redrafting Poetry, Dennis Haskell , 2002 single work criticism (p. 142-147)
Metaphor in Poetry, Debbie Westbury , 2002 single work criticism (p. 148-151)
Rhythm and Resonance in Poetry, Dennis Haskell , 2002 single work criticism (p. 157-163)
'Don't Shoot the Editor!' : Publishing in Literary Magazines, Elizabeth Webby , 2002 single work criticism (p. 185-189)
The Left Hand of Capitalism - Publishing on-line in Jacket Magazine, John Tranter , 2002 single work criticism (p. 190-194)
Book Publishing, Clare Forster , 2002 single work criticism (p. 195-200)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
Who's the Reader? Thomas Shapcott , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , April vol. 7 no. 1 2003;

— Review of The Writer's Reader : A Guide to Writing Fiction and Poetry 2002 anthology criticism
A Gregarious Culture : Australian Non-Fiction, 2001-02 James Wieland , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 47 no. 2002; (p. 100-115)

— Review of How Simone de Beauvoir Died in Australia Sylvia Lawson 2002 selected work short story essay criticism ; Republics of Ideas : Republicanism Culture Visual Arts John Conomos 2001 anthology essay ; Storykeepers 2001 anthology essay criticism ; Words for Country : Landscape and Language in Australia 2002 anthology non-fiction ; The Writer's Reader : A Guide to Writing Fiction and Poetry 2002 anthology criticism ; From the Front : Being the Observations of Mr. A.B. (Banjo) Paterson : Special War Correspondent in South Africa : November 1899 to July 1900,for the Argus, the Sydney Mail, the Sydney Morning Herald A. B. Paterson 2000 selected work prose correspondence autobiography ; Australian Literary Studies vol. 20 no. 2 October 2001 periodical issue ; Homage to John Forbes 2002 anthology criticism biography poetry interview autobiography ; David Malouf : A Celebration 2001 anthology essay criticism ; The Diaries of Donald Friend. Volume 1 Donald Friend 2001 selected work diary ; Always Unreliable : The Memoirs Clive James 2001 selected work autobiography ; Passions of the First Wave Feminists Susan Magarey 2001 single work criticism ; A Gregarious Culture : Topical Writings of Miles Franklin Miles Franklin Jill Roe Margaret Bettison 2001 selected work column correspondence prose review criticism autobiography interview
Who's the Reader? Thomas Shapcott , 2003 single work review
— Appears in: TEXT : The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs , April vol. 7 no. 1 2003;

— Review of The Writer's Reader : A Guide to Writing Fiction and Poetry 2002 anthology criticism
A Gregarious Culture : Australian Non-Fiction, 2001-02 James Wieland , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: Westerly , November vol. 47 no. 2002; (p. 100-115)

— Review of How Simone de Beauvoir Died in Australia Sylvia Lawson 2002 selected work short story essay criticism ; Republics of Ideas : Republicanism Culture Visual Arts John Conomos 2001 anthology essay ; Storykeepers 2001 anthology essay criticism ; Words for Country : Landscape and Language in Australia 2002 anthology non-fiction ; The Writer's Reader : A Guide to Writing Fiction and Poetry 2002 anthology criticism ; From the Front : Being the Observations of Mr. A.B. (Banjo) Paterson : Special War Correspondent in South Africa : November 1899 to July 1900,for the Argus, the Sydney Mail, the Sydney Morning Herald A. B. Paterson 2000 selected work prose correspondence autobiography ; Australian Literary Studies vol. 20 no. 2 October 2001 periodical issue ; Homage to John Forbes 2002 anthology criticism biography poetry interview autobiography ; David Malouf : A Celebration 2001 anthology essay criticism ; The Diaries of Donald Friend. Volume 1 Donald Friend 2001 selected work diary ; Always Unreliable : The Memoirs Clive James 2001 selected work autobiography ; Passions of the First Wave Feminists Susan Magarey 2001 single work criticism ; A Gregarious Culture : Topical Writings of Miles Franklin Miles Franklin Jill Roe Margaret Bettison 2001 selected work column correspondence prose review criticism autobiography interview
Archival Salvage : History’s Reef and the Wreck of the Historical Novel A. Frances Johnson , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-21)
'In recent years debates about the ethics of portraying Indigenous subjects and subject matter have almost been superseded by circular debates about 'true' Australian history and who has the right to tell it. This has been disappointing in a context of the morally and formally imaginative speculations of historians such as Tom Griffiths, Fiona Paisley, Stephen Kinnane and Greg Dening, and also in a context of Indigenous studies Professor Marcia Langton's evidently too-hopeful calls for the activation of a shared cultural space. But as this local debate has become more heated, more public, the oddest spectacle of all in recent years was the recent lambasting of historical novelists.

Novelist Kate Grenville was a particular target of attack. Notable historians such as Mark McKenna, John Hirst and Inga Clendinnen vociferously condemned dramatic accounts of the past as anachronistic, unethical and, most curious of all in relation to the fictioneer's job description, untrue. I revisit the 'history wars' stoush to argue that these historians overlooked the suasion of broader, local political battles to determine and culturally enshrine particular narratives of Australian pasts; I argue that they also eschewed the linguistic turn of postmodernism and the contributions made therein by prominent historical scholars in their own field such as Hayden White and Dominic LaCapra. The paper finally shows how Grenville, Kim Scott and other novelists have engaged with colonial archival materials, deploying particular narrative techniques that enable them to generate compelling postcolonial dramatisations of colonial pasts. (Author's abstract)
Last amended 21 Dec 2009 13:54:39
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