y Brigid and the Cub single work   novel   young adult  
Is part of The Cub Ethel Turner 1915-1919 series - author novel (number 3 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1919 1919
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Another story of the lovers whose history is now forming a series of readable romances. [...] They have not as yet reached the end every reader has in view for them, and Brigid is in Paris for most of the time, where the Cub spends such leave as he can get. The end of the section comes in England, and is brought about by the news of the armistice and the admission thereby of the Allies' victory.'

Source:

'Brigid and the Cub' [review], The World's News, 27 December 1919, p.29. (Via Trove Australia)

Notes

  • Dedication: Dedicated to all young things in love. 'Good shepherd, tell this youth what 'tis to love...' -- As You Like It.
  • Epigraph: 'And after all, and after all / Our passionate prayers and sighs and tears...There was a youth called Romeo, / There was a maid named Juliet.' -- Victor Daley.
  • According to contemporary reviews, the novel was originally serialised in The Daily Telegraph (unsighted).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1919 .
      Extent: 252 p., [5] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1920 .
      Extent: 252 p.,[6] leaves of plates :p.
      Description: illus.
Alternative title: Brigid och Cub
Language: Swedish
    • Stockholm,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fahlcrantz , 1920 .
      Extent: 219p.

Works about this Work

“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
Representations of Mothers and Mothering in Contemporary Australian Children's Literature Margot Hillel , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: La Trobe Library Journal , Spring no. 60 1997; (p. 97-107)
Ethel Turner and the Concept of "Two Kinds of Australian Patriotism" Sandy Yarwood , 1993 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 8 no. 3 1993; (p. 13-14)
Writing the Home : The Literary Careers of Ethel Turner and L. M. Montgomery Brenda Niall , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 175-180)
Niall discusses the literary careers of Australian writer Ethel Turner and Canadian writer L. M. Montgomery with attention to how, as contemporaries, their experiences often paralleled one another. She argues that Turner revolutionized Australian children's literature by bringing 'the action indoors and show[ing] that suburban Australia could be at least as interesting as the outback' (175). As Niall points out 'traditionally, Australian writers have concerned themselves with the city or the bush; there is very little representation of small town communities or closely settled farming districts' (178-179). Up until the 1960s there was very little development of novels that celebrate regionalism and Niall cites Colin Thiele's The Sun on the Stubble as 'perhaps the best example of an emerging regional tradition' (179). While Montgomery's recurring motif was 'the orphan's search for a home', Turner's novels often centred on the struggle of an individual or family 'with poverty or a father's tyranny as the source of conflict' (178), and featured independent and resourceful heroines who often had to choose between 'a career as a writer or artist and marriage and motherhood' (176).
Fiction 1919 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 20 December 1919; (p. 3)

— Review of Camp Kiddies : A Story of Life on Railway Construction Lillian M. Pyke 1919 single work children's fiction ; Captain Jim Mary Grant Bruce 1919 single work children's fiction ; Brigid and the Cub Ethel Turner 1919 single work novel
Fiction 1919 single work review
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 20 December 1919; (p. 3)

— Review of Camp Kiddies : A Story of Life on Railway Construction Lillian M. Pyke 1919 single work children's fiction ; Captain Jim Mary Grant Bruce 1919 single work children's fiction ; Brigid and the Cub Ethel Turner 1919 single work novel
Ethel Turner and the Concept of "Two Kinds of Australian Patriotism" Sandy Yarwood , 1993 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 8 no. 3 1993; (p. 13-14)
Representations of Mothers and Mothering in Contemporary Australian Children's Literature Margot Hillel , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: La Trobe Library Journal , Spring no. 60 1997; (p. 97-107)
Writing the Home : The Literary Careers of Ethel Turner and L. M. Montgomery Brenda Niall , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 175-180)
Niall discusses the literary careers of Australian writer Ethel Turner and Canadian writer L. M. Montgomery with attention to how, as contemporaries, their experiences often paralleled one another. She argues that Turner revolutionized Australian children's literature by bringing 'the action indoors and show[ing] that suburban Australia could be at least as interesting as the outback' (175). As Niall points out 'traditionally, Australian writers have concerned themselves with the city or the bush; there is very little representation of small town communities or closely settled farming districts' (178-179). Up until the 1960s there was very little development of novels that celebrate regionalism and Niall cites Colin Thiele's The Sun on the Stubble as 'perhaps the best example of an emerging regional tradition' (179). While Montgomery's recurring motif was 'the orphan's search for a home', Turner's novels often centred on the struggle of an individual or family 'with poverty or a father's tyranny as the source of conflict' (178), and featured independent and resourceful heroines who often had to choose between 'a career as a writer or artist and marriage and motherhood' (176).
“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
Last amended 2 Jul 2014 11:31:52
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