A Poet's Home single work   poetry   "Here in this lonely rill-engirdled spot,"
  • Author: Charles Harpur http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/harpur-charles
Composed: Singleton, Singleton area, Hunter Valley, Newcastle - Hunter Valley area, New South Wales,
Issue Details: First known date: 1842 1842
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Quite good love poem.' (Webby)

Notes

  • This poem appears in a number of published versions from 1842 and several manuscript versions also exist. The first line remains the same through all but one of the versions, but the length of the poem varies from 42 lines, in the Australasian Chronicle to 346 lines in one manuscript version. For further details see Holt and Perkins, The Poems of Charles Harpur: An Analytical Finding List (2002).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Alternative title: The Poet's Wish: A Fragment
  • Appears in:
    y Australasian Chronicle vol. 4 no. 451 27 September 1842 Z1126765 1842 newspaper issue 1842 pg. 2
    Note: With title: 'The Poet's Wish: A Fragment'. Comprises 42 lines.

Works about this Work

The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Marvell and Charles Harpur Leon Cantrell , 1973 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 6 no. 1 1973; (p. 88-90)
Marvell and Charles Harpur Leon Cantrell , 1973 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 6 no. 1 1973; (p. 88-90)
The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 5 Oct 2011 13:36:16
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