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Issue Details: First known date: 2000 2000
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'During his life, Tex Camfoo has been classified as Aboriginal, half-caste and European. As a half-caste he could not legally associate with or marry an Aboriginal woman. As an Aboriginal, he was not allowed to visit the pub with his European work mates.'

'Nelly Camfoo was always considered Aboriginal. From childhood she has taken part in ceremonial life. She finds white people both frustrating and foolish - 'they can't understand because they can't listen'.'

'The stories of Tex and Nelly Camfoo intermingle to highlight the ambiguous social position of Aboriginals living in the Northern Territory during the last century. They provide insight into race relations, the contradictory attitudes of missionaries and police, they reflect morality and religion as well as recent political developments.' (Source: Publisher's website)

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Works about this Work

y United by the Sweep of a Tarnished Brush Yuanfang Shen , Penny Edwards , Canberra : Australian National University , 2000 Z939967 2000 single work essay

Briefly outlining white Australians' attitudes to Chinese settlers in Australia, the authors note the often close relationships between Chinese and Aboriginal people, the effect of the land rights movement in motivating people of mixed race to identify as Aborigines, and the trend to increased recognition of dual and multiple ancestries.

y United by the Sweep of a Tarnished Brush Yuanfang Shen , Penny Edwards , Canberra : Australian National University , 2000 Z939967 2000 single work essay

Briefly outlining white Australians' attitudes to Chinese settlers in Australia, the authors note the often close relationships between Chinese and Aboriginal people, the effect of the land rights movement in motivating people of mixed race to identify as Aborigines, and the trend to increased recognition of dual and multiple ancestries.

Last amended 1 Dec 2015 11:04:06
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