912506094664781093.jpg
Screen cap from opening credits
form y One Night the Moon single work   film/TV  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A young girl goes missing within the Australian landscape and her father refuses to let an Aboriginal man, Albert, be included in the search party and utilise his 'tracking' skills. It is a decision that proves fatal. Months later, the child's mother approaches Albert to begin the tracking process that eventually leads her to her lost child.

Notes

  • The idea for this screenplay was prompted by a documentary that screened on SBS called Blacktracker (Michael Riley, 1997).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Respecting Protocols for Representing Aboriginal Cultures Jared Thomas , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'This essay undertakes a detailed discussion of how respecting protocols for representing Indigenous cultures supports the interests of Indigenous communities and producers of stories with Indigenous content. To highlight the importance of Indigenous protocols I review the prominence and reception of Aboriginal stories in Australian film and literature and discuss how protocol guidelines can prevent problematic representations. I demonstrate how protocols influenced writing Calypso Summer (2014), a novel exploring issues relating to my cultural group, the Nukunu, to illustrate the challenges encountered and benefits gained from employing Indigenous representation protocols. ' (Author's introduction)
One Night the Moon (Rachel Perkins, 2001) Georgina Willis , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March no. 70 2014;

— Review of One Night the Moon John Romeril Rachel Perkins 2001 single work film/TV
Seriously Funny : History and Humour in The Sapphires and Other Indigenous Comedies Rose Capp , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , July no. 63 2012;
'The Sapphires (Wayne Blair, 2012) opens in an idyllic rural setting. A group of young Aboriginal girls run home across the paddocks in the fading evening light to sing for a gathering of family and friends. But this benign atmosphere rapidly switches to terror as white Australian Government officials arrive on the scene and forcibly remove one of the girls from the Cummeraganja Mission community. It is the late 1960s, and State and Federal Government "child protection" policies allow the removal of so-called "half-caste" Aboriginal children from their families, leaving a devastating and traumatic legacy that the film goes on to address.' (Author's introduction)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Law and Identity at the Fence Kieran Dolin , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 3 no. 1 2009; (p. 133-146)
'This article analyses the leitmotif of the fence in two Australian films from around the turn of the twenty-first century, Rabbit-Proof Fence and One Night the Moon. Drawing on the work of theorists such as Bhabha, Certeau and Morson it argues that in the aftermath of the landmark decisions acknowledging Aboriginal title to land in Australia these films revisit the legal past to make new claims with regard to sovereignty and to address the possibilities and barriers for reconciliation. In these contrasting films, the fence functions as a border, a 'space in-between' where new identities and visions of property are adumbrated.'
Film is the New Black Michaela Boland , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Financial Review , 6-7 June 2009; (p. 28)
Rachel Perkins Australian Film Commission , 2007 single work non-fiction
— Appears in: Dreaming in Motion : Celebrating Australia's Indigenous Filmmakers 2007; (p. 51-53)
Contains Rachel Perkin's short film biography, her filmography, details on the film: Radiance and One Night the Moon, and a small commentary by Perkins on filmmaking.
Out from the Shadows Marcia Langton , 2006 single work criticism (taught in 1 units)
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 65 no. 1 2006; (p. 55-64)
Discusses the characterisation of the Aboriginal tracker in Australian films.
Blak Screens and Cultural Citizenship Faye Ginsburg , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Visual Anthropology Review , vol. 21 no. 1 & 2 2006; (p. 80-97)
Research into how the “media worlds” of Indigenous feature filmmaking came into being in Australia is part of the broader project of the burgeoning work in the ethnography of media, which turns the analytic lens of anthropology on the production, circulation and consumption of media in a variety of locales, in this case asking what role these media play in the discursive evolution of new ways of conceptualizing diversity, contributing to the expanding (if contested) understandings of Australia as a culturally diverse nation, something that activist filmmakers have long understood. Their films contribute to that process not only by offering alternative accountings that undermine the fictions presented by unified national narratives as they play on screen; their work (in both senses of the word) also demonstrates that a textual analysis is not sufficient if it does not also take into account the “off screen” cultural and political labor of Aboriginal activists whose interventions have made this possible. More broadly, I underscore the importance of media and those who make it as critical to understanding how contemporary states and their citizens negotiate diversity. - Author's abstract.
Shared Dreamings Waiting to be Filmed Mark Byrne , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 31 May 2005; (p. 15)
Give up the Ghosts : Reconciliation, Memory and Longing in a New Australian Cinema Sarah Jane Scott , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , Winter vol. 19 no. 2 2004; (p. 163-193)
'In this paper the author extend upon the differing modes of expression available in recent Australian films that deal with indigenous themes. Using three films that confront issues of race relations, Rabbit-Proof Fence, Beneath Clouds and One Night the Moon, ...'
"This Land is Mine/ This Land is Me" : Reconciling Harmonies in One Night the Moon Fiona Probyn , Catherine Simpson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March-April no. 19 2002;
One Night The Moon : Interview with Rachel Perkins Kathryn Millard (interviewer), 2001 single work interview
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , November-December no. 17 2001;
One Night the Moon (Rachel Perkins, 2001) Georgina Willis , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March no. 70 2014;

— Review of One Night the Moon John Romeril Rachel Perkins 2001 single work film/TV
Shared Dreamings Waiting to be Filmed Mark Byrne , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 31 May 2005; (p. 15)
Out from the Shadows Marcia Langton , 2006 single work criticism (taught in 1 units)
— Appears in: Meanjin , vol. 65 no. 1 2006; (p. 55-64)
Discusses the characterisation of the Aboriginal tracker in Australian films.
Rachel Perkins Australian Film Commission , 2007 single work non-fiction
— Appears in: Dreaming in Motion : Celebrating Australia's Indigenous Filmmakers 2007; (p. 51-53)
Contains Rachel Perkin's short film biography, her filmography, details on the film: Radiance and One Night the Moon, and a small commentary by Perkins on filmmaking.
Law and Identity at the Fence Kieran Dolin , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 3 no. 1 2009; (p. 133-146)
'This article analyses the leitmotif of the fence in two Australian films from around the turn of the twenty-first century, Rabbit-Proof Fence and One Night the Moon. Drawing on the work of theorists such as Bhabha, Certeau and Morson it argues that in the aftermath of the landmark decisions acknowledging Aboriginal title to land in Australia these films revisit the legal past to make new claims with regard to sovereignty and to address the possibilities and barriers for reconciliation. In these contrasting films, the fence functions as a border, a 'space in-between' where new identities and visions of property are adumbrated.'
Film is the New Black Michaela Boland , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian Financial Review , 6-7 June 2009; (p. 28)
Blak Screens and Cultural Citizenship Faye Ginsburg , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Visual Anthropology Review , vol. 21 no. 1 & 2 2006; (p. 80-97)
Research into how the “media worlds” of Indigenous feature filmmaking came into being in Australia is part of the broader project of the burgeoning work in the ethnography of media, which turns the analytic lens of anthropology on the production, circulation and consumption of media in a variety of locales, in this case asking what role these media play in the discursive evolution of new ways of conceptualizing diversity, contributing to the expanding (if contested) understandings of Australia as a culturally diverse nation, something that activist filmmakers have long understood. Their films contribute to that process not only by offering alternative accountings that undermine the fictions presented by unified national narratives as they play on screen; their work (in both senses of the word) also demonstrates that a textual analysis is not sufficient if it does not also take into account the “off screen” cultural and political labor of Aboriginal activists whose interventions have made this possible. More broadly, I underscore the importance of media and those who make it as critical to understanding how contemporary states and their citizens negotiate diversity. - Author's abstract.
One Night The Moon : Interview with Rachel Perkins Kathryn Millard (interviewer), 2001 single work interview
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , November-December no. 17 2001;
"This Land is Mine/ This Land is Me" : Reconciling Harmonies in One Night the Moon Fiona Probyn , Catherine Simpson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March-April no. 19 2002;
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Seriously Funny : History and Humour in The Sapphires and Other Indigenous Comedies Rose Capp , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , July no. 63 2012;
'The Sapphires (Wayne Blair, 2012) opens in an idyllic rural setting. A group of young Aboriginal girls run home across the paddocks in the fading evening light to sing for a gathering of family and friends. But this benign atmosphere rapidly switches to terror as white Australian Government officials arrive on the scene and forcibly remove one of the girls from the Cummeraganja Mission community. It is the late 1960s, and State and Federal Government "child protection" policies allow the removal of so-called "half-caste" Aboriginal children from their families, leaving a devastating and traumatic legacy that the film goes on to address.' (Author's introduction)
Respecting Protocols for Representing Aboriginal Cultures Jared Thomas , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'This essay undertakes a detailed discussion of how respecting protocols for representing Indigenous cultures supports the interests of Indigenous communities and producers of stories with Indigenous content. To highlight the importance of Indigenous protocols I review the prominence and reception of Aboriginal stories in Australian film and literature and discuss how protocol guidelines can prevent problematic representations. I demonstrate how protocols influenced writing Calypso Summer (2014), a novel exploring issues relating to my cultural group, the Nukunu, to illustrate the challenges encountered and benefits gained from employing Indigenous representation protocols. ' (Author's introduction)
Give up the Ghosts : Reconciliation, Memory and Longing in a New Australian Cinema Sarah Jane Scott , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , Winter vol. 19 no. 2 2004; (p. 163-193)
'In this paper the author extend upon the differing modes of expression available in recent Australian films that deal with indigenous themes. Using three films that confront issues of race relations, Rabbit-Proof Fence, Beneath Clouds and One Night the Moon, ...'
Last amended 15 Oct 2014 10:13:30
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  • Flinders Ranges, North East South Australia, Far North South Australia, South Australia,
  • 1932
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