form y The Back of Beyond single work   film/TV   biography  
Issue Details: First known date: 1954 1954
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Regarded as one of Australia's most successful and affectionately remembered documentaries, The Back of Beyond follows mailman Tom Kruse as he makes his fortnightly deliveries along the Birdsville Track. The theme explored is very much that of the ability of Australians to adapt to the harshness of the central Australian outback.

Instead of the typical documentary film's 'single voice of authority,' Back of Beyond's narration is provided by several storytellers representative of the voices of the outback. These people include Kruse, the women on the two-way radio, Malcolm (an Aboriginal man), and the Birdsville policeman.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Form: screenplay
      1954 .
      (Manuscript) assertion
      Note/s:
      • MS 1. First draft of the shooting script for 'The back of beyond', written by Heyer at Beecroft during Feb. and Mar. 1953. The original working title was 'A carrier called Kruse'.
      • MS 2. Original MS. music score by John Kay.
      • MS 3. Shooting script used by John Heyer throughout the production in Sydney and Central Australia.
      • MS 4. Post production script of 'The Back of Beyond' (1954).

      Holdings

      Held at: National Library of Australia
      Location: Manuscript section
      Local Id: NLA MS 859

Works about this Work

y The Back of Beyond Sylvia Lawson , Strawberry Hills : Currency Press , 2013 Z1924352 2013 single work criticism

'The Back of Beyond celebrates the life and times of Australia’s best known outback mail man Tom Kruse MBE. Every fortnight he battled isolation, heat, sand dunes and floods to deliver mail and supplies to the families along the 517 kilometre Birdsville Track in central Australia.

'Representing the complex interrelations of the multicultural community and their environs, the film is considered by many to be one of Australia’s premier films, and is an exemplary representation of 1950s Australian transformational culture.' (Publication blurb)

Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Beyond Good/Should/Bad : Teaching Australian Indigenous Film and Television Therese Davis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 5 2010; (p. 799 - 804)
The Back of Beyond Jonathan Dawson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , no. 50 2009;

— Review of The Back of Beyond John Heyer Janet Heyer Roland Robinson 1954 single work film/TV biography
y Australian Film in the 1950s Tom O'Regan , Perth : Centre for Research in Culture and Communication (Murdoch University) , 1995 Z1611522 1987 single work criticism Tom O'Regan notes that 'historiographically, the Australian film industry of the 1950s is known for both the restrictive circumstances of production and its location films.' In this essay he examines both the development of particular frameworks for the appreciation of films (including Australian cinema) and the interrelationship between film and cultural spheres (particularly theatre and arts policy) across the decade. O'Regan also demonstrates how events and discourses of the 1950s formed an important conceptual and institutional pre-history for subsequent developments in the 1960s leading towards the 1970s Australian film industry revival.
On "The Back Of Beyond" Interview with Ross Gibson Tom O'Regan (interviewer), Brian Shoesmith (interviewer), Albert Moran (interviewer), 1987 single work interview
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media and Cultural Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 1987;
To Go Back and Beyond Stuart Cunningham , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 2 no. 1 1987;
The Back of Beyond Jonathan Dawson , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , no. 50 2009;

— Review of The Back of Beyond John Heyer Janet Heyer Roland Robinson 1954 single work film/TV biography
y Australian Film in the 1950s Tom O'Regan , Perth : Centre for Research in Culture and Communication (Murdoch University) , 1995 Z1611522 1987 single work criticism Tom O'Regan notes that 'historiographically, the Australian film industry of the 1950s is known for both the restrictive circumstances of production and its location films.' In this essay he examines both the development of particular frameworks for the appreciation of films (including Australian cinema) and the interrelationship between film and cultural spheres (particularly theatre and arts policy) across the decade. O'Regan also demonstrates how events and discourses of the 1950s formed an important conceptual and institutional pre-history for subsequent developments in the 1960s leading towards the 1970s Australian film industry revival.
On "The Back Of Beyond" Interview with Ross Gibson Tom O'Regan (interviewer), Brian Shoesmith (interviewer), Albert Moran (interviewer), 1987 single work interview
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media and Cultural Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 1987;
To Go Back and Beyond Stuart Cunningham , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 2 no. 1 1987;
Beyond Good/Should/Bad : Teaching Australian Indigenous Film and Television Therese Davis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 24 no. 5 2010; (p. 799 - 804)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
y The Back of Beyond Sylvia Lawson , Strawberry Hills : Currency Press , 2013 Z1924352 2013 single work criticism

'The Back of Beyond celebrates the life and times of Australia’s best known outback mail man Tom Kruse MBE. Every fortnight he battled isolation, heat, sand dunes and floods to deliver mail and supplies to the families along the 517 kilometre Birdsville Track in central Australia.

'Representing the complex interrelations of the multicultural community and their environs, the film is considered by many to be one of Australia’s premier films, and is an exemplary representation of 1950s Australian transformational culture.' (Publication blurb)

Last amended 19 Jun 2015 07:22:20
Subjects:
  • Birdsville Track SA / Qld, North East South Australia, Far North South Australia, South Australia,
  • Australian Outback, Central Australia,
  • 1952
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