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Seems Like Yesterday single work   drama  
Issue Details: First known date: 2001 2001
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Seems Like Yesterday is the story of a troop of Australian soldiers in Vietnam whose security in identity and sense of right as Australians is thrown upside down with the arrival of a new recruit who happens to be an Aboriginal...' (Source: Lynette Hughes 2001)

Production Details

  • Produced by Kooemba Jdarra Indigenous Performing Arts Company and performed at Merivale Street Studio, South Brisbane, August 16 to September 1, 2001.

    Director: Nadine McDonald.

    Designer: Alison Ross

    Cast: Roxanne McDonald, Ariu Sio, Bradley Byquar, Paul Denny, Marc Richards, Sean Dennehy, Nigel Poulton and Yalin Ozuculik.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Elite Indigenous Masculinity in Textual Representations of Aboriginal Service in the Vietnam War Noah Riseman , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , February vol. 40 no. 1 2016; (p. 32-44)

'This article analyses three texts that feature Aboriginal soldiers or veterans of the Vietnam War as protagonists: the novel Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys (1999), the play Seems Like Yesterday (2001) and the Redfern Now television episode “The Dogs of War” (2013). In all three texts, military service in Vietnam inculcates among the protagonists sentiments constitutive of what Brendan Hokowhitu refers to as elite Indigenous masculinity—the mimicry and appropriation of white hegemonic masculinity. Constructing themselves as elite Indigenous males allows the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans to position themselves as superior to “other” Aboriginal males. Through the course of the texts, though, the protagonists come to realise that elite Indigenous masculinity is a myth because civilian (white) Australia will continue to judge them the same as other Aboriginal men. Through encounters with other Aboriginal men, the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans are able to reconceptualise their own masculinities and to accept the legitimacy of multiple Aboriginal masculinities.'

Source: Abstract.

y Kooemba Jdarra's and George Bostock's 'Seems Like Yesterday' Lynette Hughes , 8129131 2001 single work review
— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama

A review of George Bostock's play Seems Like Yesterday.

Text : Review Mary Nemeth , 2001 single work
— Appears in: Rave Magazine , 21 August 2001; (p. 39)

— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama
Yesterday's Hero Des Partridge , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 August 2001; (p. 26)

— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama
Easy to Believe in Yesterday James Harper , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 22 August 1998; (p. 36)

— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama
y Kooemba Jdarra's and George Bostock's 'Seems Like Yesterday' Lynette Hughes , 8129131 2001 single work review
— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama

A review of George Bostock's play Seems Like Yesterday.

Easy to Believe in Yesterday James Harper , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 22 August 1998; (p. 36)

— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama
Text : Review Mary Nemeth , 2001 single work
— Appears in: Rave Magazine , 21 August 2001; (p. 39)

— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama
Yesterday's Hero Des Partridge , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 August 2001; (p. 26)

— Review of Seems Like Yesterday George Bostock 2001 single work drama
Elite Indigenous Masculinity in Textual Representations of Aboriginal Service in the Vietnam War Noah Riseman , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , February vol. 40 no. 1 2016; (p. 32-44)

'This article analyses three texts that feature Aboriginal soldiers or veterans of the Vietnam War as protagonists: the novel Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys (1999), the play Seems Like Yesterday (2001) and the Redfern Now television episode “The Dogs of War” (2013). In all three texts, military service in Vietnam inculcates among the protagonists sentiments constitutive of what Brendan Hokowhitu refers to as elite Indigenous masculinity—the mimicry and appropriation of white hegemonic masculinity. Constructing themselves as elite Indigenous males allows the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans to position themselves as superior to “other” Aboriginal males. Through the course of the texts, though, the protagonists come to realise that elite Indigenous masculinity is a myth because civilian (white) Australia will continue to judge them the same as other Aboriginal men. Through encounters with other Aboriginal men, the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans are able to reconceptualise their own masculinities and to accept the legitimacy of multiple Aboriginal masculinities.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 9 Dec 2015 13:01:46
Settings:
  • Dubbo, Dubbo area, Wellington - Dubbo - Narromine area, Central West NSW, New South Wales,
  • c
    Vietnam,
    c
    Southeast Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
  • 1960s
  • 2000s
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