Issue Details: First known date: 2000 2000
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The essay concentrates on the metaphysical implications of Malouf's ontological perception of man in relation to the Australian landscape and on the parrallels that emerge betwen man's deeper self and a humanised nature.

Notes

  • This paper was read at a conference on "Comings and Goings : Britain and Australia, Past and Future", organised by the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies and held at King's College, London, 12-14 September, 2000.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Commonwealth Reconciliation; Commonwealth : Essays and Studies vol. 23 no. 1 Autumn 2000 Z866444 2000 periodical issue 2000 pg. 89-98

Works about this Work

David Malouf's Haunted Writing Colette Selles , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 269-285)
'The two novels this paper focuses on, Remembering Babylon and The Conversations at Curlow Creek, testify to David Malouf's ongoing 'dialogue with Australia'. Published in 1993 and 1996, two centuries after the arrival of the First Fleet of convicts, they engage with crucial issues in a postcolonial Australia which still has to negotiate its existential uncertainty. By returning to the first half of the nineteenth century, the narratives face the ghosts of the past which have haunted Australia, notably the stain of its origins as a penal colony: a sense of exile to the edge of the world is combined with the legacy of historical wrongs, the atrocities of the convict system and the devastating impact of colonization on the Aboriginal peoples - from dispossession to massacre or assimilationist policies which have engendered social alienation and spiritual dislocation.' (p. 270)
David Malouf's Haunted Writing Colette Selles , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 269-285)
'The two novels this paper focuses on, Remembering Babylon and The Conversations at Curlow Creek, testify to David Malouf's ongoing 'dialogue with Australia'. Published in 1993 and 1996, two centuries after the arrival of the First Fleet of convicts, they engage with crucial issues in a postcolonial Australia which still has to negotiate its existential uncertainty. By returning to the first half of the nineteenth century, the narratives face the ghosts of the past which have haunted Australia, notably the stain of its origins as a penal colony: a sense of exile to the edge of the world is combined with the legacy of historical wrongs, the atrocities of the convict system and the devastating impact of colonization on the Aboriginal peoples - from dispossession to massacre or assimilationist policies which have engendered social alienation and spiritual dislocation.' (p. 270)
Last amended 14 Jun 2001 12:22:57
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