5169976815031878663.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys single work   novel   war literature  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999 1999
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Kenny was barely nineteen years old, a wide-eyed Aboriginal kid from the bush, when he left Australia for a tour of duty in Vietnam. From the fleshpots of Saigon to the ‘sharp end’, clearing mines at Nu Dat, there was a lot to learn for a young man in a strange country, fighting a murky, confusing war. Not Quite Men, no longer boys is the gritty moving story of Kenny’s education in life and death – and the kinds of friendship that last a lifetime.' (Source: IAD Press website)

Notes

  • Dedication: dedicated to the sappers, NCOs and officiers of 3 troop 1 Field Squadron Nui Dat, South Vietnam, my mates. The finest bunch of men one could ever wish to serve with.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,: Jukurrpa Books , 1999 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Tunnel Rats of Phuoc Tuyi"They sent us here to be tested in battle,", K. C. Laughton , 1999 single work poetry war literature (p. 4-5)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Alice Springs, Southern Northern Territory, Northern Territory,: Jukurrpa Books , 1999 .
      5169976815031878663.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 352p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 1864650060

Works about this Work

Elite Indigenous Masculinity in Textual Representations of Aboriginal Service in the Vietnam War Noah Riseman , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , February vol. 40 no. 1 2016; (p. 32-44)

'This article analyses three texts that feature Aboriginal soldiers or veterans of the Vietnam War as protagonists: the novel Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys (1999), the play Seems Like Yesterday (2001) and the Redfern Now television episode “The Dogs of War” (2013). In all three texts, military service in Vietnam inculcates among the protagonists sentiments constitutive of what Brendan Hokowhitu refers to as elite Indigenous masculinity—the mimicry and appropriation of white hegemonic masculinity. Constructing themselves as elite Indigenous males allows the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans to position themselves as superior to “other” Aboriginal males. Through the course of the texts, though, the protagonists come to realise that elite Indigenous masculinity is a myth because civilian (white) Australia will continue to judge them the same as other Aboriginal men. Through encounters with other Aboriginal men, the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans are able to reconceptualise their own masculinities and to accept the legitimacy of multiple Aboriginal masculinities.'

Source: Abstract.

BlackWords : Indigenous Stories Told Collecively Anita Heiss , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 5)

In this essay Heiss discusses and explains the important role of anthologies in the creation of communities of writers and in acknowledging, consolidating and launching writing careers.

An Innocent Abroad on a Tour of Duty Christopher Bantick , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 May 1999; (p. 3-4)

— Review of Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys K. C. Laughton 1999 single work novel
An Innocent Abroad on a Tour of Duty Christopher Bantick , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 May 1999; (p. 3-4)

— Review of Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys K. C. Laughton 1999 single work novel
BlackWords : Indigenous Stories Told Collecively Anita Heiss , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The BlackWords Essays 2015; (p. 5)

In this essay Heiss discusses and explains the important role of anthologies in the creation of communities of writers and in acknowledging, consolidating and launching writing careers.

Elite Indigenous Masculinity in Textual Representations of Aboriginal Service in the Vietnam War Noah Riseman , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , February vol. 40 no. 1 2016; (p. 32-44)

'This article analyses three texts that feature Aboriginal soldiers or veterans of the Vietnam War as protagonists: the novel Not Quite Men, No Longer Boys (1999), the play Seems Like Yesterday (2001) and the Redfern Now television episode “The Dogs of War” (2013). In all three texts, military service in Vietnam inculcates among the protagonists sentiments constitutive of what Brendan Hokowhitu refers to as elite Indigenous masculinity—the mimicry and appropriation of white hegemonic masculinity. Constructing themselves as elite Indigenous males allows the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans to position themselves as superior to “other” Aboriginal males. Through the course of the texts, though, the protagonists come to realise that elite Indigenous masculinity is a myth because civilian (white) Australia will continue to judge them the same as other Aboriginal men. Through encounters with other Aboriginal men, the Aboriginal soldiers/veterans are able to reconceptualise their own masculinities and to accept the legitimacy of multiple Aboriginal masculinities.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 2 Dec 2014 13:03:05
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