2247527315418080336.jpg
y Leaf Tail single work   picture book   children's  
Leaf Tail Issue Details: First known date: 1989... 1989
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Leaf Tail is a lizard. But he is no ordinary lizard, and he lives in a far from ordinary place. For he is a Northern Leaf-tailed Gecko and his home is the rainforest of Queensland. The author takes us on a journey into the Australian rainforest. Here we meet some of the fascinating wildlife of the mysterious world.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Lothian , 1994 .
      2247527315418080336.jpg
      Extent: 28p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 0850916534

Works about this Work

The Art of Narelle Oliver Joy Lawn (interviewer), 2009 single work interview
— Appears in: Magpies: Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 24 no. 4 2009; (p. 4-6)
In response to Lawn's questions regarding her artistic vision, innovative techniques and interest in natural Australian history, Oliver says her work is created through the 'intriguing relationship between words and pictures' and how 'they work either together or against each other as different points of view in a narrative' (4). Lawn asks Oliver about her 'vision and vocation' which, through her strong artistic style and celebratory designs of Australian indigenous animals, produces texts that are a 'melding of non-fiction and fiction' (5). Oliver says she has been fascinated by indigenous adaptations of Australian native animals since early childhood and this interest developed further when she studied biology. With her first picture book, Leaf Tail she wanted to introduce young readers to 'some of the less-well-known Australian creatures' but 'did not want to write a straight information book' (5). Instead, she wanted to explore the creative potential of the adaptive features to be found among many creatures - design, shape, texture and pattern - in terms of storytelling and 'problem-solution scenarios' (5). Oliver has also produced picture books about imaginary and mythological creatures, for example, Mermaids Most Amazing, The Very Blue Thingamajig, and Dancing the Boom-cha-cha Boogie, however, it is mainly through her natural history picture books that she aims to capture the diversity of Australia's natural landscapes and 'instil postive feelings about these places in young Australian readers' (6). In this sense, her work is driven by the belief that 'a personal feeling and knowledge of the landscape is critical to developing a desire to preserve that landscape' (6).
Untitled Rosemary Buchanan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 39 no. 1 1995; (p. 15)

— Review of Leaf Tail Narelle Oliver 1989 single work picture book
More than just a picture book about our rainforests Laurie Copping , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 10 June 1995; (p. C12)

— Review of Leaf Tail Narelle Oliver 1989 single work picture book
Dreams, Forest and an Inquisitive Young Gecko Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier Mail , 22 July 1989; (p. Weekend 7)

— Review of Leaf Tail Narelle Oliver 1989 single work picture book
Dreams, Forest and an Inquisitive Young Gecko Robyn Sheahan-Bright , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier Mail , 22 July 1989; (p. Weekend 7)

— Review of Leaf Tail Narelle Oliver 1989 single work picture book
More than just a picture book about our rainforests Laurie Copping , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 10 June 1995; (p. C12)

— Review of Leaf Tail Narelle Oliver 1989 single work picture book
Untitled Rosemary Buchanan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , February vol. 39 no. 1 1995; (p. 15)

— Review of Leaf Tail Narelle Oliver 1989 single work picture book
The Art of Narelle Oliver Joy Lawn (interviewer), 2009 single work interview
— Appears in: Magpies: Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 24 no. 4 2009; (p. 4-6)
In response to Lawn's questions regarding her artistic vision, innovative techniques and interest in natural Australian history, Oliver says her work is created through the 'intriguing relationship between words and pictures' and how 'they work either together or against each other as different points of view in a narrative' (4). Lawn asks Oliver about her 'vision and vocation' which, through her strong artistic style and celebratory designs of Australian indigenous animals, produces texts that are a 'melding of non-fiction and fiction' (5). Oliver says she has been fascinated by indigenous adaptations of Australian native animals since early childhood and this interest developed further when she studied biology. With her first picture book, Leaf Tail she wanted to introduce young readers to 'some of the less-well-known Australian creatures' but 'did not want to write a straight information book' (5). Instead, she wanted to explore the creative potential of the adaptive features to be found among many creatures - design, shape, texture and pattern - in terms of storytelling and 'problem-solution scenarios' (5). Oliver has also produced picture books about imaginary and mythological creatures, for example, Mermaids Most Amazing, The Very Blue Thingamajig, and Dancing the Boom-cha-cha Boogie, however, it is mainly through her natural history picture books that she aims to capture the diversity of Australia's natural landscapes and 'instil postive feelings about these places in young Australian readers' (6). In this sense, her work is driven by the belief that 'a personal feeling and knowledge of the landscape is critical to developing a desire to preserve that landscape' (6).
Last amended 24 Mar 2015 10:22:23
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