y Nettie Palmer : Search for an Aesthetic single work   criticism  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999 1999
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A critical biography of Nettie Palmer looking at her work and perspective on life both pre World War 1, where her feminism, mysticism and an overseas cultural view was integrated into her working life and relationships, and post war when she turned away from an internationalist outlook and continued her working life in Australia focused on "core values of creation, honour and integrity, marriage and nature and began with what was at hand - the social, intellectual and aesthetic life in Australia."

Notes

  • Includes checklist of Palmer's work, pp. 283-312

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The University of Queensland Press : Poetry and Material Culture Deborah Jordan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fryer Folios , June vol. 6 no. 1 2011; (p. 14-17)
Deborah Jordan discusses the role of University of Queensland Press as a significant publisher of Australian poetry in the 1960s
Heeding the Warnings : ‘Sucking up the Seas’ in Vance Palmer’s Cyclone Deborah Jordan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 20-31)
'Climate change literary criticism calls for fundamental re-evalutions of our critical tools. In representations of extreme weather events, Vance Palmer's Cyclone set in North Queensland meets many of the new criterion with its story about the impact of the cyclone on individuals, community and plot. The genesis and inspiration of the novel, its writing, its publication, review and reception can be addressed. The cyclone is seen through the perceptions of different characters. Vance and Nettie Palmer knew many of the people drowned in the 1934 cyclone. Palmer drew on the historical record in his novel, which was published over a decade later. The reception of Cyclone was very limited given it was published locally by Angus & Robertson and had no serious critical response. The environmental imagination has been a powerful force in Australia creative writing and is undervalued in contemporary debates.' (Author's abstract)
Writing Daughter : Writing Mother Deborah Jordan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mother-Texts : Narratives and Counter-Narratives 2010; (p. 110-125)
'Deborah Jordan relates some of her experiences in writing a a book, and subsequently self-publishing it, about her mother's life as a writer. Writing Mothers/Writing Daughters is a theme explored in different contexts, and in different genres. One thinks of Dursilla Modjeska's Poppy or of the biography of Edna Ryan by her equally acclaimed daughter. Jordan addresses the making of There's a Woman in the House, A 1950s Journey, which is a self publishing venture to celebrate the life and work of her own mother, through her own voice, with a collection of her own writings as a freelance journalist in the 1950s. It addresses, some of the issues that arose in the process of re-discovery and publication and some of the ideologies and options of genre. (Publisher's abstract, xviii)
Untitled Patricia Clarke , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , October vol. 31 no. 115 2000; (p. 376-377)

— Review of Nettie Palmer : Search for an Aesthetic Deborah Jordan 1999 single work criticism
Untitled Patricia Clarke , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Historical Studies , October vol. 31 no. 115 2000; (p. 376-377)

— Review of Nettie Palmer : Search for an Aesthetic Deborah Jordan 1999 single work criticism
The University of Queensland Press : Poetry and Material Culture Deborah Jordan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fryer Folios , June vol. 6 no. 1 2011; (p. 14-17)
Deborah Jordan discusses the role of University of Queensland Press as a significant publisher of Australian poetry in the 1960s
Writing Daughter : Writing Mother Deborah Jordan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Mother-Texts : Narratives and Counter-Narratives 2010; (p. 110-125)
'Deborah Jordan relates some of her experiences in writing a a book, and subsequently self-publishing it, about her mother's life as a writer. Writing Mothers/Writing Daughters is a theme explored in different contexts, and in different genres. One thinks of Dursilla Modjeska's Poppy or of the biography of Edna Ryan by her equally acclaimed daughter. Jordan addresses the making of There's a Woman in the House, A 1950s Journey, which is a self publishing venture to celebrate the life and work of her own mother, through her own voice, with a collection of her own writings as a freelance journalist in the 1950s. It addresses, some of the issues that arose in the process of re-discovery and publication and some of the ideologies and options of genre. (Publisher's abstract, xviii)
Heeding the Warnings : ‘Sucking up the Seas’ in Vance Palmer’s Cyclone Deborah Jordan , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 20-31)
'Climate change literary criticism calls for fundamental re-evalutions of our critical tools. In representations of extreme weather events, Vance Palmer's Cyclone set in North Queensland meets many of the new criterion with its story about the impact of the cyclone on individuals, community and plot. The genesis and inspiration of the novel, its writing, its publication, review and reception can be addressed. The cyclone is seen through the perceptions of different characters. Vance and Nettie Palmer knew many of the people drowned in the 1934 cyclone. Palmer drew on the historical record in his novel, which was published over a decade later. The reception of Cyclone was very limited given it was published locally by Angus & Robertson and had no serious critical response. The environmental imagination has been a powerful force in Australia creative writing and is undervalued in contemporary debates.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 12 Jan 2016 13:32:38
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