Screen cap from promotional trailer
form y Oscar and Lucinda single work   film/TV  
Adaptation of Oscar and Lucinda Peter Carey 1988 single work novel
Issue Details: First known date: 1997 1997
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

In England during the early 1800s, Oscar, a young but good-hearted misfit, believes that God has given him a sign to leave his father and his faith and join the Church of England while Lucinda, a teenaged Australian heiress, has a strong desire to liberate her sex from the confines of male-dominated culture. She buys a glass factory, and dreams of building a church made almost entirely of glass and then transporting it to the Australian outback. Oscar and Lucinda meet on a ship going to Australia; once there, they are each ostracised from society for different reasons, and join forces. Since both are passionate gamblers, Lucinda bets Oscar her entire inheritance that he cannot transport the glass church to the outback safely. Oscar accepts her wager, and this leads to the events that change both their lives forever.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Armstrong's Peers Acknowledge Her Brilliant Career Rosalie Higson , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 11 May 2006; (p. 3)
"This Land is Mine/ This Land is Me" : Reconciling Harmonies in One Night the Moon Fiona Probyn , Catherine Simpson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March-April no. 19 2002;
Altering Horizons : An Aesthetic of Reception and Reproduction in Oscar and Lucinda Alice Healy , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies in the 21st Century 2001; (p. [145]-150)
"[Explores] the changing conditions under which texts, such as Oscar and Lucinda are read, interpreted, translated and reproduced by using the theories of [Hans Robert] Jauss and [Wolfgang] Iser."
Filming Peter Carey: From the Adequate to the Distorted Theodore F. Sheckels , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 13 no. 2 1999; (p. 91-94)
Peter Craven Reviews the Film of Oscar and Lucinda Peter Craven , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February-March no. 198 1998; (p. 25-26)
Tripping on the Light Fantastic : A Bit of a Look at Australian Film Adrian Mitchell , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Studies in English , vol. 23 no. 1997;
'In the beginning is the word: there has to be a script. But even before a word is said there's light, and camera, and action. Films are before all else about light, and about what can be realised through light. That pre-eminence of light was acknowledged in the old-time movie theatres, in the custom, now regrettably lapsed, of having the projection illuminating the screen before the curtains were drawn open, so that the promised world of light could be glimpsed before revelation, symbolically seen through a veil which then parted — and behold, a new heaven and a new earth. Those who arrived late, after the houselights had gone down, followed their own little subdued pool of light, the usherette's torch, down the carpeted aisles.' (Author's abstract)
Altering Horizons : An Aesthetic of Reception and Reproduction in Oscar and Lucinda Alice Healy , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies in the 21st Century 2001; (p. [145]-150)
"[Explores] the changing conditions under which texts, such as Oscar and Lucinda are read, interpreted, translated and reproduced by using the theories of [Hans Robert] Jauss and [Wolfgang] Iser."
Armstrong's Peers Acknowledge Her Brilliant Career Rosalie Higson , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 11 May 2006; (p. 3)
Tripping on the Light Fantastic : A Bit of a Look at Australian Film Adrian Mitchell , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Studies in English , vol. 23 no. 1997;
'In the beginning is the word: there has to be a script. But even before a word is said there's light, and camera, and action. Films are before all else about light, and about what can be realised through light. That pre-eminence of light was acknowledged in the old-time movie theatres, in the custom, now regrettably lapsed, of having the projection illuminating the screen before the curtains were drawn open, so that the promised world of light could be glimpsed before revelation, symbolically seen through a veil which then parted — and behold, a new heaven and a new earth. Those who arrived late, after the houselights had gone down, followed their own little subdued pool of light, the usherette's torch, down the carpeted aisles.' (Author's abstract)
y Reel Locations : The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films Anthony Roberts , Prahran : Explore Australia , 2011 Z1793927 2011 single work prose travel 'Did you know that because baby pigs grow at an alarming rate, 48 pigs were used for the filming of Babe? Or that the town of Poowong in South Gippsland was selected for the premier of Kenny? Reel Locations: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Aussie Films is a book for anyone with an interest in Australian films - and for those wanting to relive the magic that was created. Covering 20 iconic Australian flicks, film buff Anthony Roberts not only details what locations were used for particular scenes, but also offers travel information on what you'll see if you visit these locations now, as well as where to eat and where to stay. A vibrant design, film stills and many quirky facts round out this enjoyable book that is ideal for both armchair travellers and eager tourists.' (Publisher's blurb)
"This Land is Mine/ This Land is Me" : Reconciling Harmonies in One Night the Moon Fiona Probyn , Catherine Simpson , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Senses of Cinema , March-April no. 19 2002;
Reconciliation and the History Wars in Australian Cinema Felicity Collins , 2011-2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exhuming Passions : The Pressure of the Past in Ireland and Australia 2012; (p. 207-222)
'When The Proposition ( a UK/Australia co-production, directed by John Hillcoat and scripted by Nick Cave) was released in 2005, film reviewers had no qualms about claiming this spectacular saga of colonial violence on the Queensland frontier as a 'history' film. A reviewer on BBC Radio 4 described The Proposition as 'a bushranger Western...set in violent 1880s Australian outback exposing the bitter racial tensions between English and Irish settlers. A Sunday Times review declared that 'Australia's brutal post-colonial history is stripped of all the lies in a bloody clash of cultures between the British police, the Irish bushrangers and the Aborigines.' Foregrounding the film's revisionist spectacle of colonial violence, an Australian reviewer predicted that, despite 'scenes of throat-cutting torture, rape and exploding heads...The Proposition could be the most accurate look at our national history yet'. (Author's introduction, 207)
Peter Craven Reviews the Film of Oscar and Lucinda Peter Craven , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , February-March no. 198 1998; (p. 25-26)
Filming Peter Carey: From the Adequate to the Distorted Theodore F. Sheckels , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 13 no. 2 1999; (p. 91-94)
Last amended 15 Oct 2014 10:15:25
Settings:
  • c
    England,
    c
    c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • Sydney, New South Wales,
  • Bellingen, Dorrigo - Bellingen area, New England, New South Wales,
  • 1800s
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