y Cocky's Calendar : Poems sequence   poetry  
  • Author: David Campbell http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/campbell-david
Issue Details: First known date: 1961 1961
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Contents

* Contents derived from the Adelaide, South Australia,: Australian Letters , 1961 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
The Red Cocki"The red cock crows within my brain,", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry Summer
Prayer for Raini"Sweet rain, bless our windy farm,", David Campbell , 1958 single work poetry
To a Ground-Larki"When I go out to sow the wheat", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
This Windi"This wind as sharp as tooth of briar", David Campbell , 1958 single work poetry
Winter Hillsi"The storms have greened the winter hills", David Campbell , 1956 single work poetry The Farmer
Pallid Cuckoo [I]i"Alone the pallid cuckoo now", David Campbell , 1956 single work poetry
Bindweed and Yellowtailsi"These little blushing flowers that part", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
Under the Wattlesi"Now, here and there, against the cold,", David Campbell , 1960 single work poetry Wattle Trees
The Red Hawki"The red hawk hangs upon the wind", David Campbell , 1961 single work poetry
Hawk and Hilli"When from the still crystal of thought", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
On Frosty Daysi"On frosty days, when I was young,", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
Against the Suni"See how these Autumn days begin", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry

Includes

Against the Sun i "See how these Autumn days begin", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 July vol. 78 no. 4041 1957; (p. 35) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 8) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 38) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 75-76) Hardening of the Light : Selected Poems 2006; (p. 48)
On Frosty Days i "On frosty days, when I was young,", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 June vol. 78 no. 4036 1957; (p. 2) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 10) Songs for All Seasons : 100 Poems for Young People 1967; (p. 1) Australia Fair : Poems and Paintings 1974; (p. 56) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 40)
Hawk and Hill i "When from the still crystal of thought", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 July vol. 78 no. 4041 1957; (p. 35) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 5) The Vital Decade : Ten Years of Australian Art and Letters 1968; (p. 98) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 37) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 74)
The Red Hawk i "The red hawk hangs upon the wind", David Campbell , 1961 single work poetry
— Appears in: Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 13) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 42) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 79) Hardening of the Light : Selected Poems 2006; (p. 52) Song for a Wren : Country Poems and Images 2009; (p. 30)
Under the Wattles i "Now, here and there, against the cold,", David Campbell , 1960 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 October vol. 81 no. 4210 1960; (p. 2) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 12) The Vital Decade : Ten Years of Australian Art and Letters 1968; (p. 96) The Penguin Book of Australian Verse 1972; (p. 273) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 41)
Bindweed and Yellowtails i "These little blushing flowers that part", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 16 no. 3 1957; (p. 272) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 11) The Vital Decade : Ten Years of Australian Art and Letters 1968; (p. 96) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 42) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 78-79) Hardening of the Light : Selected Poems 2006; (p. 52)
Pallid Cuckoo [I] i "Alone the pallid cuckoo now", David Campbell , 1956 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 14 November vol. 77 no. 4005 1956; (p. 2) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 11) Modern Australian Verse 1964; (p. 114-115) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 41) The Collins Book of Australian Poetry 1981; (p. 212)
Winter Hills i "The storms have greened the winter hills", David Campbell , 1956 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 5 September vol. 77 no. 3995 1956; (p. 2) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 9) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 40) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 77) Hardening of the Light : Selected Poems 2006; (p. 50)
This Wind i "This wind as sharp as tooth of briar", David Campbell , 1958 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 July vol. 79 no. 4090 1958; (p. 2) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 9) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 39) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 76) Hardening of the Light : Selected Poems 2006; (p. 49)
To a Ground-Lark i "When I go out to sow the wheat", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 24 July vol. 78 no. 4041 1957; (p. 35) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 8) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 39) Collected Poems 1989; (p. 76) Hardening of the Light : Selected Poems 2006; (p. 49)
Prayer for Rain i "Sweet rain, bless our windy farm,", David Campbell , 1958 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Letters , November vol. 1 no. 4 1958; (p. 37) Australian Poetry 1959 1959; (p. 18) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 7) Modern Australian Writing 1966; (p. 104) The Vital Decade : Ten Years of Australian Art and Letters 1968; (p. 44) Mendorong Jack Kuntikunti : sepilihan sajak dari Australia 1991; (p. 54-55)
The Red Cock i "The red cock crows within my brain,", David Campbell , 1957 single work poetry
— Appears in: Australian Poetry 1957 1957; (p. 53) The Bulletin , 24 July vol. 78 no. 4041 1957; (p. 35) Cocky's Calendar : Poems 1961; Australian Letters , March vol. 3 no. 3 1961; (p. 6) The Vital Decade : Ten Years of Australian Art and Letters 1968; (p. 98) Selected Poems 1978; (p. 37)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Sketches and pen drawings by Russell Drysdale.
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Letters vol. 3 no. 3 March 1961 Z593379 1961 periodical issue 1961 pg. 4-13
    • Adelaide, South Australia,: Australian Letters , 1961 .
      Extent: 20p.
      Series: y Australian Poets and Artists Australian Artists and Poets Booklets Australian Letters (publisher), Adelaide : 1960- Z1085044 1960- series - publisher

      With a keen interest in art and poetry, the magazine Australian Letters commissioned a series of artist-poet collaborations, including contributions from Russell Drysdale and David Campbell, Donald Friend and Douglas Stewart, Leonard French and James McAuley, and Sidney Nolan and Randolph Stow. Eighteen of these collaborations formed part of the numbered series published in the journal. Fourteen of these were issued as separately published booklets.

      Dutton in his editorial in the final issue of Australian Letters refers to nineteen collaborations. The collaboration between Tony Butt and Charles Blackman in vol.7, no.4 (1967) is not numbered but may be the nineteenth in the series.

      Number in series: 2

Works about this Work

Ecopoetics of the Limestone Plains Kate Rigby , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 153-175)

The Limestone Plains is the name given by British explorers in the 1820s to the area in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, where the city of Canberra would later be built. Watered by the Molonglo, a tributary of the Murrumbidgee, and ringed by wooded hills, this area was a significant meeting place of several Aboriginal tribes, whose fire-stick farming practices had shaped its flora and fauna over the millennia. In the nineteenth century, the Canberra area provided a living for pastoralists and selectors, whose activities altered the local ecology and had a devastating impact on Indigenous people. The city that was founded on the Limestone Plains in 1913 in turn displaced this rural way of life, although remnants of pastoralism persisted beyond the urban fringe into the twenty-first century. Canberra's 'bush capital' was conceived as a city in and of the landscape, and it remains a place where town and country interpenetrate to a remarkable degree. As well as providing something of a haven for wildlife, Canberra and its surrounds have also nurtured numerous writers. In this essay, I will investigate the ways in which explorers and settlers construed the Limestone Plains as a locus of pastoral dwelling, before proceeding to consider how some more recent writers have responded to this place in literary form by attending to the more-than-human world that persists both within and beyond the city. (from The Littoral Zone)

'Speak with the Sun' : Energy, Light, and Love in the Poetry of David Campbell R. F. Brissenden , 1983 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , October vol. 27 no. 10 1983; (p. 66-71) Australian Papers : Yugoslavia, Europe and Australia 1983; (p. 203-215)
Ecopoetics of the Limestone Plains Kate Rigby , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Littoral Zone : Australian Contexts and Their Writers 2007; (p. 153-175)

The Limestone Plains is the name given by British explorers in the 1820s to the area in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales, where the city of Canberra would later be built. Watered by the Molonglo, a tributary of the Murrumbidgee, and ringed by wooded hills, this area was a significant meeting place of several Aboriginal tribes, whose fire-stick farming practices had shaped its flora and fauna over the millennia. In the nineteenth century, the Canberra area provided a living for pastoralists and selectors, whose activities altered the local ecology and had a devastating impact on Indigenous people. The city that was founded on the Limestone Plains in 1913 in turn displaced this rural way of life, although remnants of pastoralism persisted beyond the urban fringe into the twenty-first century. Canberra's 'bush capital' was conceived as a city in and of the landscape, and it remains a place where town and country interpenetrate to a remarkable degree. As well as providing something of a haven for wildlife, Canberra and its surrounds have also nurtured numerous writers. In this essay, I will investigate the ways in which explorers and settlers construed the Limestone Plains as a locus of pastoral dwelling, before proceeding to consider how some more recent writers have responded to this place in literary form by attending to the more-than-human world that persists both within and beyond the city. (from The Littoral Zone)

'Speak with the Sun' : Energy, Light, and Love in the Poetry of David Campbell R. F. Brissenden , 1983 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , October vol. 27 no. 10 1983; (p. 66-71) Australian Papers : Yugoslavia, Europe and Australia 1983; (p. 203-215)
Last amended 15 Apr 2015 13:48:35
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