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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

A post-modern fable set in Dark Ages Ireland. A king had a beautiful daughter. She was so beautiful that any man who saw her at once wanted to marry her. The poor king got so fed up with this he locked his daughter in a round tower where an old monastery had once stood. In the end the king was forced to proclaim that any man who could open the door would have his daughter's hand in marriage and become heir to the throne.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Potts Point, Kings Cross area, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Duffy and Snellgrove , 2001 .
      3841186156338105264.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 204p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 18755989889

Works about this Work

Back to the Holy Isle Susan Lever , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: David Foster : The Satirist of Australia 2008; (p. 175-194)
Displaced from the Sacred Sites : David Foster's In the New Country and The Land Where Stories End Susan Lever , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 64-74)
David Foster's novels consistently interpret Australia as 'colonial', with its white settlers denied any spiritual connection with the natural environment, and its indigenous people displaced and damaged by white settlement. Moonlite (1981) follows the displacement of indigenous people from the outlying islands of Scotland to become the settlers of a colony like Australia, and in turn displace the Aborigines. The Glade Within the Grove proposes a radical new religion, based on the castration rites of the ancient world, that might overcome white Australians' alienation from the land with a new commitment to the environment. But Foster's most recent novels suggest a loss of hope in Australia, as In the New Country offers a farcical parody of The Glade, and The Land Where Stories End seeks spiritual consolation in a fairytale set in seventh-century Ireland, that recalls the sacred sites of the Scottish islanders in Moonlite. This article examines these two novels as the impossible search of a 'colonial mongrel' for a sacred place, in Ireland or Australia, and the signs that such a place may belong in a lost time, only accessible through writing. In Foster's novels writing is the last resort for the sacred, in a world engulfed by a global economic imperialism. (Author's abstract)
One Hell of an Angel A. P. Riemer , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 April 2001; (p. 11)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Tales of a cheeky angel Mark Thomas , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 28 April 2001; (p. 17)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Foster's Fairytale to Scare the Inner Child Michelle Griffin , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 5 May 2001; (p. 9)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Land of Hope and Story Michael Sharkey , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12-13 May 2001; (p. 15)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel ; The Architect : A Tale John Scott 2001 single work novel
Bonfire of the Inanities Kathy Hunt , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 June vol. 119 no. 6279 2001; (p. 72)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Foster's Fantasy for the Age Owen Richardson , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 230 2001; (p. 36-37)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Strangely Consoling Ephraem J. Chifley , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , June no. 213 2001; (p. 38)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
One Hell of an Angel A. P. Riemer , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 7 April 2001; (p. 11)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Tales of a cheeky angel Mark Thomas , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 28 April 2001; (p. 17)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Foster's Fairytale to Scare the Inner Child Michelle Griffin , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 5 May 2001; (p. 9)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Land of Hope and Story Michael Sharkey , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 12-13 May 2001; (p. 15)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel ; The Architect : A Tale John Scott 2001 single work novel
Bonfire of the Inanities Kathy Hunt , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 19 June vol. 119 no. 6279 2001; (p. 72)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Foster's Fantasy for the Age Owen Richardson , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , May no. 230 2001; (p. 36-37)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Strangely Consoling Ephraem J. Chifley , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Adelaide Review , June no. 213 2001; (p. 38)

— Review of The Land Where Stories End : As Narrated by the Angel Depicted in 'Madonna con Bambino e due Angeli' by Filippo Lippi David Foster 2001 single work novel
Back to the Holy Isle Susan Lever , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: David Foster : The Satirist of Australia 2008; (p. 175-194)
Displaced from the Sacred Sites : David Foster's In the New Country and The Land Where Stories End Susan Lever , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 64-74)
David Foster's novels consistently interpret Australia as 'colonial', with its white settlers denied any spiritual connection with the natural environment, and its indigenous people displaced and damaged by white settlement. Moonlite (1981) follows the displacement of indigenous people from the outlying islands of Scotland to become the settlers of a colony like Australia, and in turn displace the Aborigines. The Glade Within the Grove proposes a radical new religion, based on the castration rites of the ancient world, that might overcome white Australians' alienation from the land with a new commitment to the environment. But Foster's most recent novels suggest a loss of hope in Australia, as In the New Country offers a farcical parody of The Glade, and The Land Where Stories End seeks spiritual consolation in a fairytale set in seventh-century Ireland, that recalls the sacred sites of the Scottish islanders in Moonlite. This article examines these two novels as the impossible search of a 'colonial mongrel' for a sacred place, in Ireland or Australia, and the signs that such a place may belong in a lost time, only accessible through writing. In Foster's novels writing is the last resort for the sacred, in a world engulfed by a global economic imperialism. (Author's abstract)
Last amended 18 Aug 2016 11:25:10
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