Alternative title: Mysteries of the Dreaming
Issue Details: First known date: 1989 1989
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Spiritual Life of Australian Aborigines'

'In Mysteries of the Dreaming, James Cowan brings to life Aboriginal spirituality in all its majesty. Men of Power, celestial journeys, meditational techniques, the complex calendar of ritual and ceremony and the role of the body as a spiritual icon are all explored in the context of this deeply religious, ancient race.' (Source: Publisher's website)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Lindfield, Chatswood - Gordon - Castlecrag area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Unity Press , 1989 .
      Extent: 128.p.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Brandl and Schlesinger , 1989 .
      7439065824945991824.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 191p.
      Description: col. illus.
      Reprinted: 2001 printing , 1992 Revised Ed.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliography and index
      ISBN: 1853270385

Works about this Work

The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
The Pleiades and the Dreamtime : An Aboriginal Women's Story and Other Ancient World Traditions Antonella Riem Natale , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 9 2012;
James Cowan and the White Quest for Black Self Mitchell Rolls , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2001; (p. 1-20)
The Transnational Fantasy : The Case of James Cowan Peter Matthews , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 67-73)
'Recent criticism has seen the rise of an approach to literature that views texts as products of 'transnationalism,' a move that arises from a growing sense that, in a global age, authors should not be bounded by the traditional limits of national culture. In her book Cosmopolitan Style: Modernism Beyond the Nation (2006), for instance, Rebecca Walkowitz looks at how this trend has evolved in world Anglophone literature, extending from canonical writers like Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf to such contemporary authors as Salman Rushdie, Kazuo Ishiguro, and W.G. Sebald. In the field of Australian literature, the question of transnationalism is often linked to issues of postcolonialism, as reflected in recent critical works like Graham Huggan's Australian Literature: Postcolonialism, Racism, Transnationalism (2007) and Nathanael O'Reilly's edited collection Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature (2010), both of which examine how Australian literature and culture have metamorphosed in the new global context. While there is little doubt that world literature has been affected in important ways by this broadening of literary stage, there seems to be a widespread conflation between two similar but different terms: the transnational and transcultural. For while it is true that the culture of many countries arises from a cosmopolitan and diverse assortment of influences, this loosening of cultural boundaries between nations is far from being simultaneous with the decline of the state.' (Author's introduction)
The Pleiades and the Dreamtime : An Aboriginal Women's Story and Other Ancient World Traditions Antonella Riem Natale , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 9 2012;
James Cowan and the White Quest for Black Self Mitchell Rolls , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Aboriginal Studies , no. 1 2001; (p. 1-20)
Last amended 13 Oct 2016 13:12:30
X