3592879249902732806.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
385580718676858562.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Memorial single work   picture book   young adult  
Issue Details: First known date: 1999 1999
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A story to help us all remember ... When soldiers return from the First World War in 1918, a memorial tree is planted ... 'Lest we forget'. But generations later, what do those who pause in the shadows of the tree's immense branches remember?'
(Source: Back cover)

Notes

  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Port Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Lothian , 1999 .
      3592879249902732806.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 32p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 0850919835 (hbk.)
    • South Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Lothian , 2003 .
      Extent: [30]p.
      ISBN: 0734405456
    • Vancouver, British Columbia,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Simply Read Books , 2004 .
      Extent: 1 v. (unpaged)p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 1894965086
    • c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Hachette , 2015 .
      385580718676858562.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 1vp.
      Note/s:
      • Published 13 May 2015
      ISBN: 9780734416544

Works about this Work

Remembering the Past through Picture Books Cherie Allan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 12-24)

In anticipation of the commemorations around the centenary of World War 1 (2014-2018) this chapter examines the ways in which war and its effects have been represented in picture books for children. It looks at the ways in which these picture books create “textual monuments” as points of reference through which younger generations can “develop a narrative of the past” and “explore different points of view”.

Ruins or Foundations : Great War Literature in the Australian Curriculum Clare Rhoden , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'The Great War has been represented in Australian curricula since 1914, in texts with tones ranging from bellicose patriotism to idealistic pacifism. Australian curricula have included war literature as one way of transmitting cultural values, values that continue to evolve as successive generations relate differently to war and peace. Changes in ethical perspectives and popular feeling have guided text selection and pedagogy, so that texts which were once accepted as foundational to Australian society seem, at later times, to document civilisation's ruin.

In recent years, overseas texts have been preferred above Australian examples as mediators of the Great War, an event still held by many to be of essential importance to Australia. This paper first considers arguments for including Great War texts on the national curriculum, exploring what war literature can, and cannot, be expected to bring to the program. Interrogating the purpose/s of war literature in the curriculum and the ways in which the texts may be used to meet such expectations, the paper then discusses styles of war texts and investigates whether there is a case for including more texts by Australian authors.' (Author's abstract)
y Playing with Picturebooks : Postmodernism and the Postmodernesque Cherie Allan , Houndmills : Palgrave Macmillan , 2012 Z1909588 2012 single work criticism "Postmodernism has played a significant part in the development of playful and experimental picturebooks for children over the past 50 years. Playing with Picturebooks offers fresh insights into the continuing influence of postmodernism on picturebooks for children, covering a wide range of international picturebooks predominantly from the 1980s to the present. It represents a significant contribution to current debates centred on the decline of the effects of postmodernism on fiction and detects a shift from the postmodern to the postmodernesque. Playing with Picturebooks draws on a wide range of critical perspectives in examining postmodern approaches to narrative and illustration. Chapters discuss how metafictive devices enable different modes of representation, offer different perspectives to authorised version of history, and promote difference and ex-centricity over unity. Playing with Picturebooks is essential reading, not only for academics in the field of children's literature, but also for researchers, teachers and students." (Back cover)
Mapping Australia's Past in Picture Books Robin Morrow , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 47 no. 2 2009; (p. 18-26)
"This paper examines four influential Australian picture books that provide narratives from different perspectives, representing the white men's (and especially military) history, white women's (settler) history, Aboriginal history (from traditional life to colonial and then post-colonial), and finally everybody's history, especially giving a voice to children". - Paper abstract
The Paradoxes of History in Crew and Woolman's Tagged and Crew and Tan's Memorial Alice Mills , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rethinking History : The Journal of Theory and Practice , vol. 6 no. 3 2002; (p. 331-343)
'The publication of two illustrated books with verbal text by the Australian writer Gary Crew provides an opportunity to compare the presentation of war memories in picture story book and graphic novel format. Gary Crew and Shaun Tan's Memorial (1999) is a thought-provoking picture story book, while Crew and Steven Woolman's Tagged (1997) is an idiosyncratic graphic novel. The picture story book illustrations depict the commemorative tree as more real, more present than the book's human beings. The verbal text asserts that memory will live on through generations of the war veterans' family, as in the tree, but the illustrations of the cutting down of the tree and the verbal text revealing a veteran's self-censorship reveal these claims to be at best tenuous, at worst, false. Nevertheless, despite the current town council's disrespect for the commemorative tree, the Anzac Day ceremony remains a socially sanctioned rite of remembering war. The illustrations to Tagged represent a war veteran's confused mind and his compulsive reliving of his past as confusing visual images with a lack of clear cues for the reader's eye to follow, as the boy observer moves more deeply into the labyrinthine building where the man hides. While Memorial's war memorials are complete, public, in good condition and easily accessible, the bewildering passages and openings of Tagged's building suggest the man's stuck memories, the boy's problems with interpreting war images and also a society's not altogether successful attempt to repress collective acknowledgement of its war past. In contrast with Memorial, Tagged is a memorial to the unknown solder, offering a different kind of historical truth to any official, public, empty tomb.'
More Than Cracking the Code : Postmodern Picture Books and New Literacies Michele Anstey , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Crossing the Boundaries 2002; (p. 87-105)
Text and Illustrations in Unison Belle Y. Alderman , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 19 August 2000; (p. 19)

— Review of Jenny Angel Margaret Wild 1999 single work picture book ; Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley 1999 single work picture book ; Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Books to Look Forward to : Memorial and Gallipoli Rayma Turton , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 14 no. 1 1999; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Jeff Herd , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 13 no. 3 1999; (p. 19 - 20)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Laurie Copping , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 43 no. 3 1999; (p. 27)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Kerry White , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Bookphilenewsletter , March no. 1 1999; (p. 2)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
A Knockout Nicola Robinson , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 211 1999; (p. 44)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book ; Shock Monday Gillian Bradshaw 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Susan Mayor Cox , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Winter vol. 7 no. 2 1999; (p. 44)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Passing on the Story to a New Generation Laurie Copping , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Sunday Times , 25 April 1999; (p. 18)

— Review of Anzacs at Gallipoli Cyril Ayris 1997 single work non-fiction ; Not Only a Hero: An Illustrated Life of Simpson, the Man with the Donkey Tom Curran 1998 single work biography ; Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Nicola Robinson , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 201 1998; (p. 44)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Tanya Dalgleish , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Classroom , August vol. 6 no. 1986; (p. 44 - 45)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Books to Look Forward to : Memorial and Gallipoli Rayma Turton , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 14 no. 1 1999; (p. 8-9)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Text and Illustrations in Unison Belle Y. Alderman , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 19 August 2000; (p. 19)

— Review of Jenny Angel Margaret Wild 1999 single work picture book ; Luke's Way of Looking Nadia Wheatley 1999 single work picture book ; Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Nicola Robinson , 1998 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 201 1998; (p. 44)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Jeff Herd , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 13 no. 3 1999; (p. 19 - 20)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Tanya Dalgleish , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Classroom , August vol. 6 no. 1986; (p. 44 - 45)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Laurie Copping , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 43 no. 3 1999; (p. 27)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Kerry White , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Bookphilenewsletter , March no. 1 1999; (p. 2)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
A Knockout Nicola Robinson , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June no. 211 1999; (p. 44)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book ; Shock Monday Gillian Bradshaw 1999 single work picture book
Untitled Susan Mayor Cox , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Viewpoint : On Books for Young Adults , Winter vol. 7 no. 2 1999; (p. 44)

— Review of Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Passing on the Story to a New Generation Laurie Copping , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: Sunday Times , 25 April 1999; (p. 18)

— Review of Anzacs at Gallipoli Cyril Ayris 1997 single work non-fiction ; Not Only a Hero: An Illustrated Life of Simpson, the Man with the Donkey Tom Curran 1998 single work biography ; Memorial Gary Crew 1999 single work picture book
Mapping Australia's Past in Picture Books Robin Morrow , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 47 no. 2 2009; (p. 18-26)
"This paper examines four influential Australian picture books that provide narratives from different perspectives, representing the white men's (and especially military) history, white women's (settler) history, Aboriginal history (from traditional life to colonial and then post-colonial), and finally everybody's history, especially giving a voice to children". - Paper abstract
Ruins or Foundations : Great War Literature in the Australian Curriculum Clare Rhoden , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 1 2012;
'The Great War has been represented in Australian curricula since 1914, in texts with tones ranging from bellicose patriotism to idealistic pacifism. Australian curricula have included war literature as one way of transmitting cultural values, values that continue to evolve as successive generations relate differently to war and peace. Changes in ethical perspectives and popular feeling have guided text selection and pedagogy, so that texts which were once accepted as foundational to Australian society seem, at later times, to document civilisation's ruin.

In recent years, overseas texts have been preferred above Australian examples as mediators of the Great War, an event still held by many to be of essential importance to Australia. This paper first considers arguments for including Great War texts on the national curriculum, exploring what war literature can, and cannot, be expected to bring to the program. Interrogating the purpose/s of war literature in the curriculum and the ways in which the texts may be used to meet such expectations, the paper then discusses styles of war texts and investigates whether there is a case for including more texts by Australian authors.' (Author's abstract)
y Playing with Picturebooks : Postmodernism and the Postmodernesque Cherie Allan , Houndmills : Palgrave Macmillan , 2012 Z1909588 2012 single work criticism "Postmodernism has played a significant part in the development of playful and experimental picturebooks for children over the past 50 years. Playing with Picturebooks offers fresh insights into the continuing influence of postmodernism on picturebooks for children, covering a wide range of international picturebooks predominantly from the 1980s to the present. It represents a significant contribution to current debates centred on the decline of the effects of postmodernism on fiction and detects a shift from the postmodern to the postmodernesque. Playing with Picturebooks draws on a wide range of critical perspectives in examining postmodern approaches to narrative and illustration. Chapters discuss how metafictive devices enable different modes of representation, offer different perspectives to authorised version of history, and promote difference and ex-centricity over unity. Playing with Picturebooks is essential reading, not only for academics in the field of children's literature, but also for researchers, teachers and students." (Back cover)
The Paradoxes of History in Crew and Woolman's Tagged and Crew and Tan's Memorial Alice Mills , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Rethinking History : The Journal of Theory and Practice , vol. 6 no. 3 2002; (p. 331-343)
'The publication of two illustrated books with verbal text by the Australian writer Gary Crew provides an opportunity to compare the presentation of war memories in picture story book and graphic novel format. Gary Crew and Shaun Tan's Memorial (1999) is a thought-provoking picture story book, while Crew and Steven Woolman's Tagged (1997) is an idiosyncratic graphic novel. The picture story book illustrations depict the commemorative tree as more real, more present than the book's human beings. The verbal text asserts that memory will live on through generations of the war veterans' family, as in the tree, but the illustrations of the cutting down of the tree and the verbal text revealing a veteran's self-censorship reveal these claims to be at best tenuous, at worst, false. Nevertheless, despite the current town council's disrespect for the commemorative tree, the Anzac Day ceremony remains a socially sanctioned rite of remembering war. The illustrations to Tagged represent a war veteran's confused mind and his compulsive reliving of his past as confusing visual images with a lack of clear cues for the reader's eye to follow, as the boy observer moves more deeply into the labyrinthine building where the man hides. While Memorial's war memorials are complete, public, in good condition and easily accessible, the bewildering passages and openings of Tagged's building suggest the man's stuck memories, the boy's problems with interpreting war images and also a society's not altogether successful attempt to repress collective acknowledgement of its war past. In contrast with Memorial, Tagged is a memorial to the unknown solder, offering a different kind of historical truth to any official, public, empty tomb.'
More Than Cracking the Code : Postmodern Picture Books and New Literacies Michele Anstey , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Crossing the Boundaries 2002; (p. 87-105)
Remembering the Past through Picture Books Cherie Allan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 12-24)

In anticipation of the commemorations around the centenary of World War 1 (2014-2018) this chapter examines the ways in which war and its effects have been represented in picture books for children. It looks at the ways in which these picture books create “textual monuments” as points of reference through which younger generations can “develop a narrative of the past” and “explore different points of view”.

Last amended 3 Jul 2015 12:27:45
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