3818487934798379645.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y The Lost Thing single work   picture book   children's  
Issue Details: First known date: 2000... 2000
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'A boy discovers a bizarre looking creature while out collecting bottle tops at the beach. Realising it is lost, he tries to find out who owns it or where it belongs, but is met with indifference from everyone else, who barely notice its presence, each unwilling to entertain this uninvited interruption to their day to day lives. For reasons he does not explain, the boy empathises with the creature, and sets out to find a 'place' for it.'
(Source: The Lost Thing website)

Adaptations

form y The Lost Thing Shaun Tan , Melbourne : Passion Pictures Australia , 2010 Z1700980 2010 single work film/TV fantasy

'A boy discovers a bizarre looking creature while out collecting bottle tops at the beach. Realising it is lost, he tries to find out who owns it or where it belongs, but is met with indifference from everyone else, who barely notice its presence, each unwilling to entertain this uninvited interruption to their day to day lives. For reasons he does not explain, the boy empathises with the creature, and sets out to find a "place' for it".'

Source: The Lost Thing website, http://www.thelostthing.com/

Sighted: 21/06/2010

Notes

  • Included in the 2001 White Ravens Catalogue compiled by the International Youth Library in Munich, Germany. Special mention.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording.

Affiliation Notes

  • This work is affiliated with the AustLit subset Asian-Australian Children's Literature and Publishing because it has been translated into Korean, Chinese and Japanese.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Port Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Lothian , 2000 .
      3818487934798379645.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 1 v. (unpaged)p.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 0734400748
    • Port Melbourne, South Melbourne - Port Melbourne area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Lothian , 2001 .
      Extent: 32p.
      Edition info: 1st paperback ed.
      Description: col. illus.
      ISBN: 0734403887
  • Appears in:
    y Lost and Found Shaun Tan , John Marsden , Shaun Tan (illustrator), New York (City) : Arthur A. Levine Books , 2011 Z1764283 2011 selected work picture book These three short stories focus on loss and despair to explore how we lose and find what matters most to us: a girl finds a bright spot in a dark world, a boy leads a strange, lost being home, and a group of peaceful creatures loses its home to cruel invaders.
    New York (City) : Arthur A. Levine Books , 2011
Alternative title: Irŏbŏrin kŏt
Language: Korean
    • Seoul,
      c
      South Korea,
      c
      Korea, East Asia, South and East Asia, Asia,
      :
      Sa Kyejŏl , 2002 .
      Extent: 32p.
      Description: illus.
      ISBN: 9788971969106, 8971969105

Works about this Work

Using Shaun Tan's Work to Foster Multiliteracies in 21st-Century Classrooms Ashley Dallacqua , Sara Kersten, , Mindi Rhoades , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Reading Teacher , October vol. 69 no. 2 2015; (p. 207-217)
'This paper explores work in multimodality and design as it relates to 21st century multiliteracies. After outlining the concept of a multiliteracies pedagogy, this paper describes multimodality and multimodal texts. Moving from the theoretical to the practical, this paper primarily explores selected multimodal works of Shaun Tan and the opportunities they open to bring a multiliteracies pedagogy to classrooms. It provides approachable pedagogical strategies that can be successful in a variety of classrooms. We conclude that Tan's work ultimately acts as an accessible resource for educators striving to employ multiliteracies practices and bring multimodal texts into their classrooms.' (Publication abstract)
Music, Multiliteracies and Multimodality : Exploring the Book and Movie Versions of Shaun Tan's 'The Lost Thing' Georgina Barton , Len Unsworth , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Journal of Language and Literacy , February vol. 37 no. 1 2014; (p. 3-20)

Well-known stories in established and contemporary literature for children are increasingly becoming available in various moving image media versions as well as in traditional book formats. Classroom exploration of the same story in different narrative formats has addressed the impact on meaning-making of similarities and differences in language and image across versions. What has received very little attention however, is the role of music in conjunction with image and language in the construction of the potentially different interpretive possibilities of the multiple versions of ostensibly the same story. This paper discusses the nature and role of music, images and language in the book and movie versions of Shaun Tan’s story of The Lost Thing, drawing attention to the role of music in highlighting key interpretive differences deriving from subtle variation in the use of image and language in the two story versions. Implications for students’ multimodal text creation and interpretation in the context of the new Australian Curriculum: English are briefly noted. [Author's abstract]

Investigating Point of View in Picture Books and Animated Movie Adaptations Len Unsworth , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Picture Books and Beyond 2014; (p. 92-107)

Today’s children frequently experience multiple versions of literary narratives as more and more picture books appear also as animated movies and i-pad/tablet apps. In some cases the animated versions are very different from the books but in other cases the language and the visual character representations maintain the essential features of the book versions. Works such as these afford the opportunity to appreciate how quite subtle changes in depiction from static to moving image can effect significant shifts in the interpretive possibilities. This kind of interpretive context is addressed directly in the Australian Curriculum: English, which indicates, for example, that year four and five students should be examining variation in visual point view and its impact on audiences. This chapter firstly examines the knowledge about the meaning-making resources of still and moving images that is necessary to negotiate these kinds of curriculum expectations. This is illustrated through a comparative analysis of corresponding segments of three well-known picture books.

A Similarity or Difference : The Problem of Race in Australian Picture Books Victoria Flanagan , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , April vol. 51 no. 2 2013; (p. 13-22)
'The prevailing humanist ideology in fiction produced for children entails that thematic explorations of race usually pivot on the notion that humans are all created equal, regardless of race. However, this position fails to acknowledge the privileged status of whiteness as a racial category. This article examines two recent Australian picture books which explore the relationship between white and non-white identities in an Australian social context, arguing that the construction of whiteness as a normative standard of human experience must be interrogated before genuinely intersubjective race relations can be achieved.' (Author's abstract)
y Playing with Picturebooks : Postmodernism and the Postmodernesque Cherie Allan , Houndmills : Palgrave Macmillan , 2012 Z1909588 2012 single work criticism "Postmodernism has played a significant part in the development of playful and experimental picturebooks for children over the past 50 years. Playing with Picturebooks offers fresh insights into the continuing influence of postmodernism on picturebooks for children, covering a wide range of international picturebooks predominantly from the 1980s to the present. It represents a significant contribution to current debates centred on the decline of the effects of postmodernism on fiction and detects a shift from the postmodern to the postmodernesque. Playing with Picturebooks draws on a wide range of critical perspectives in examining postmodern approaches to narrative and illustration. Chapters discuss how metafictive devices enable different modes of representation, offer different perspectives to authorised version of history, and promote difference and ex-centricity over unity. Playing with Picturebooks is essential reading, not only for academics in the field of children's literature, but also for researchers, teachers and students." (Back cover)
Untitled Graham Davey , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , November vol. 44 no. 4 2000; (p. 21)

— Review of The Lost Thing Shaun Tan 2000 single work picture book
Untitled Lyn Linning , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 15 no. 4 2000; (p. 30-31)

— Review of The Lost Thing Shaun Tan 2000 single work picture book
Untitled Anne (fl. 2001-2007) Davies , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 14 no. 3 2000; (p. 37)

— Review of The Lost Thing Shaun Tan 2000 single work picture book
Surreal Humour Margaret Dunkle , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , October no. 225 2000; (p. 58-59)

— Review of The Lost Thing Shaun Tan 2000 single work picture book ; Inside Mary Elizabeth's House Pamela Allen 2000 single work picture book ; Pannikin and Pinta Colin Thiele 2000 single work picture book ; Snow Bear Liliana Stafford 2000 single work picture book
Top Reads for Kids Cindy Lord , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 11 August 2001; (p. 6)

— Review of The Singing Hat Tohby Riddle 2000 single work picture book ; A is for Aunty Elaine Russell 2000 single work picture book ; Fox Margaret Wild 2000 single work picture book ; Faust's party Matt Ottley 2000 single work picture book ; Rain Dance Cathy Applegate 2000 single work picture book ; The Lost Thing Shaun Tan 2000 single work picture book
The Children's Book Council of Australia Annual Awards 2001 2001 single work column
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , August vol. 45 no. 3 2001; (p. 2-12)
Images of Refuge with Deep Imprint Penelope Davie , 2006 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 28 - 29 October 2006; (p. 34)
Trash Aesthetics and Utopian Memory: The Tip at the End of the Street and The Lost Thing Kerry Mallan , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Bookbird , vol. 43 no. 1 2005; (p. 28-34)
Dogboys and Lost Things, or, Anchoring a Floating Signifier : Race and Critical Multiculturalism Debra Dudek , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , October vol. 37 no. 4 2006; (p. 1-20) Australian Made : A Multicultural Reader 2010; (p. 97-118)
'In her 2004 book on multiculturalism, Haunted Nations: The Colonial Dimensions of Multiculturalisms, Sneja Gunew persistently refers to the term multiculturalism as a floating signifier. (1) While this notion of a floating signifier is helpful because it acknowledges different ways in which multiculturalism functions in specific contexts, it may be unhelpful when it floats so much as to lose any signification. While I identify myself as a postmodernist and, therefore, regularly resist universalist terminology, I find myself in a peculiar position of wanting to put limits on the term multiculturalism. (2) If multiculturalism can mean anything, then why is it important to analyze children's literature through the lens of multiculturalism, I wonder.' - Author's abstract
Desiring Perception : Finding Utopian Impulses in Shaun Tan's The Lost Thing Debra Dudek , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 15 no. 2 2005; (p. 58-66)
In this paper, Dudek argues that uptopian impulses can be found within The Lost Thing via the characters of the child, the artist, and the hybrid custodian, all of whom act as figures of resistance and hope in a dystopian world ruled by rigid and repetitive empirical discourses.
Last amended 28 Sep 2016 16:42:35
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