Alternative title: Catholic Freeman's Journal
Date: 1850-1853
Date: 1853-1856
Date: 1856-1857
Date: 1857-1860
Date: 1863
Date: 1864-1866 Note: According to the Australian Dictionary of Biography, Dalley was part-proprietor as well as editor of the Freeman's Journal and 'improved both its tone and appearance'.
Date: 1866-1869
Date: 1870-1896
Issue Details: First known date: 1850; Latest issue indexed: 1935 1850
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Latest Issues

y The Freeman's Journal 12 December 1935 Z914673 1935 newspaper issue
y The Freeman's Journal 6 December 1923 9190403 1923 newspaper issue
y The Freeman's Journal 12 June 1919 9866144 1919 newspaper issue
y The Freeman's Journal 12 December 1912 9190427 1912 newspaper issue
y The Freeman's Journal 11 July 1912 9976261 1912 newspaper issue

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

The Freeman's Journal was established in June 1850 by Archdeacon John McEncroe as a Catholic newspaper. For much of its life, the Freeman's Journal espoused liberal and non-sectarian views, though it tended to focus mainly on Church and Irish news, rather than on day to day events and political news.

Whilst it was not an official Church newspaper, the Freeman's Journal nevertheless generally supported the official Church line, the exception being during its initial period, when under the editorship of D'Arcy, Moore and then Heydon, it was deeply embroiled in Church politics.

Despite the intentions of its founder, the Freeman's Journal did not always remain aloof from political controversy either. In the later 1860s, under the editorship of radical Irish nationalist Richard O'Sullivan, its strongly sectarian position alienated Catholics and Protestants alike, and following the attempted assassination of H. R. H. Prince Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh, in Sydney in 1868, it was targeted by the New South Wales Government for its supposed disloyalty. However, its fortunes were restored during Thomas Butler's editorship, when the newspaper returned to a less sectarian, liberal position, and enjoyed a lengthy period of stability and prosperity.

Following Butler's departure, the Freeman's Journal developed political affiliations with the emerging Labor Party. Throughout its life, the Freeman's Journal remained a consistent advocate and supporter of Catholic education.

The Freeman's Journal's successor, the Catholic Weekly notes that the Journal 'was able to draw on the best minds of the day to become an eminently intelligent source, one that was never out of touch with what was happening in the local community. One of its greatest achievements was its work for Catholic education and its tireless (although unsuccessful in its time) crusade against unfair discrimination of denominational schools.' (www.catholicweekly.com.au/)

Notes

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1850
      Sydney, New South Wales,: 1850-1932 .
      Note/s:
      • Publisher varies.

Works about this Work

A Year in the Life of Victor Daley Frank Molloy , 2000 single work biography
— Appears in: Margin , July-August no. 51 2000; (p. 5-14)
Kendall's Satirical Humour Thomas Thornton Reed , 1982 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 42 no. 4 1982; (p. 363-384)
Parting Words E. F. (fl. 1868) , 1868 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 13 June vol. 19 no. 1314 1868; (p. 6-7)

'E. F.', who is about to depart the colony, pens [his] thoughts on the sectarian altercation existing between the Freeman's Journal and the Sydney Morning Herald, and on the treatment of the Freeman's at the hands of the premier, James Martin.

The correspondent wishes the Freeman's 'a glorious triumph' over Martin, and hopes that 'fairplay may again speedily reign in New South Wales'.

Town News : The 'Freeman's Journal' and the Liverpool Asylum 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 7 March vol. 19 no. 1300 1868; (p. 9)

The Freeman's Journal reports: 'A correspondent lately an inmate in the Liverpool Asylum, writes to inform us that he was forbidden by the master from reading the Freeman's Journal to a number of blind men who appeared to take some pleasure in listening to it. We are not aware of any regulations prohibiting the reading of newspapers in the asylum, and if there were, they should include the whole of the press.'

Ourselves 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 21 March vol. 19 no. 1302 1868; (p. 9)

The Freeman's Journal assures readers that rumours circulating about the journal and its proprietors are without foundation and 'were only circulated to injure us and the journal'. [The rumours began as a means of associating the Freeman's Journal with the Irishman O'Farrell who attempted to assassinate H. R. H. Prince Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh.]

The Freeman's Journal : Available Free of Charge at Holloway's 1868 single work advertisement
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 26 December vol. 19 no. 1342 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 19 December vol. 19 no. 1341 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 12 December vol. 19 no. 1340 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 31 October vol. 19 no. 1334 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 5 December vol. 19 no. 1339 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 24 October vol. 19 no. 1333 1868; (p. 16)

An advertisement advising that Freeman's Journal 'is filed and may be seen, free of charge, at Holloway's, 533, Oxford-street, W. C., (late of 224, Strand) London, where advertisements and subscriptions may be received'.

Agents for the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 26 December vol. 19 no. 1342 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 12 December vol. 19 no. 1340 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 31 October vol. 19 no. 1334 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 24 October vol. 19 no. 1333 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 5 December vol. 19 no. 1339 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 17 October vol. 19 no. 1332 1868; (p. 16)

A list of suburban, country and inter-colonial agents for the Freeman's Journal.

Weekly Summary [Dr Badham's University of Sydney Annual Commemoration Oration] 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 11 April vol. 19 no. 1305 1868; (p. 1)

The first item in the Freeman's Journal's weekly news summary concerns the oration delivered by the Rev. Dr Charles Badham, Professor of Classics and Logic, at the University of Sydney's Annual Commemoration. During his speech, Dr Badham attacked the Freeman's Journal and declared his (albeit mistaken) pleasure that the newspaper 'has ceased to exist'. The writer for the Freeman's Journal returns serve, pondering in what manner the journal might have offended Dr Badham and concluding: 'Fie! Reverend Doctor Badham, your temper has for once got the better of your classics and logic'.

Hartley 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 18 April vol. 19 no. 1306 1868; (p. 9-10)

A portion of the Freeman's Journal's correspondent's report from Hartley concerns reports that were 'rife' in the Lithgow district 'to the effect that the entire staff of the Freeman's Journal – from the "gents of the editorial corpse" (as Artemus Ward would say) down to the "type-stickers" – had "dislocated", leaving behind them nothing but half-finished leaders, dusty piles of back numbers, and masses of seditious-looking "pie".' The correspondent decries 'such silly nonsense ... as the intervention of some over-zealous admirer of Martin's awe-inspiring (?) liberty-extinguishing Act of 1868', that is, the Treason Felony Act.

Concerning Ourselves 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 25 April vol. 19 no. 1307 1868; (p. 8)

The Freeman's Journal reflects on the persecution it has faced, particularly since the March 1868 assassination attempt on H. R. H. Prince Alfred, as 'the only newspaper in Australia at all pretending to express the views of Irish Catholic Nationalists upon home and colonial matters'.

'Save and except in the withdrawal of the Government advertisements', the writer declares that 'the Freeman, so far from suffering, has gained considerably by the efforts made by the Government and their anti-Catholic sympathisers to crush it.'

Correspondence 'A Constant Reader' (fl. 1868) , 1868 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 9 May vol. 19 no. 1309 1868; (p. 9)

'A Constant Reader' writes to the Freeman's Journal highlighting the anti-Roman Catholic sentiment displayed in the pages of The Kiama Independent, and Shoalhaven Advertiser. The letter to the editor is followed by an extract from the Independent in which the Freeman's Journal is accused of exciting 'suspicions, hatred, and rancour among the various nationalities and creeds of the colony'.

Country News : The Prosecution of the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 30 May vol. 19 no. 1312 1868; (p. 10)

The Freeman's Journal reproduces a column from the Tamworth Examiner that comments on plans by the Martin government to prosecute Freeman's for not being properly registered with the Supreme Court. (See 'The Freeman's Journal and the Martin Government' for further background.)

The Freeman's Journal and the Martin Government 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 16 May vol. 19 no. 1310 1868; (p. 8)

A lengthy editorial piece on the prosecution of the proprietors of the Freeman's Journal on the grounds that the proprietors had not sworn an affidavit setting out their names with the Supreme Court. The writer argues that, since an affidavit was sworn before the Chief Justice on 29 December 1866, the failure to do the same at the Supreme Court was an unwitting and unintentional oversight. The writer can only conclude that the May 1868 prosecution of the case by the Crown Solicitor is an act instigated by New South Wales Premier James Martin in order to discredit the pro-Irish, pro-Roman Catholic newspaper.

Having subsequently complied with the law, and informing the Crown Solicitor of this fact, the proprietors received communication from the latter that the Attorney General will persist with the prosecution 'as he can find nothing in the statements [provided by the Freeman's Journal] ... to warrant him in foregoing the threatened proceedings'.

The writer for Freeman's surmises that the whole endeavour is designed by Martin (himself a Catholic of Irish descent) to 'embarrass, to cripple, or to crush' the Catholic publication. The premier 'has declared war with us simply because we express and propagate opinions unfavourable to his tenure of office, those opinions being shared in the vast majority of the Irish residents in this colony. He is sadly mistaken, however, if he fancies that he will achieve a triumph in this case.'

The Attorney General at the Prosecution of the Proprietors of the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 25 July vol. 19 no. 1320 1868; (p. 8)

An extended editorial on the legal prosecution against the proprietors of the Freeman's Journal by Attorney General, Sir James Martin. Martin claimed a total of £2408 8s in costs in the case.

Prosecution of the Freeman's Journal 1868 single work advertisement
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 1) The Bathurst Times , 29 August 1868;

An advertisement for a 'meeting of the Friends and Supporters of the Sydney Freeman's Journal'. The meeting coincided with the prosecution of the Freeman's Journal's proprietors, by Attorney General James Martin, over their non-compliance with registration regulations.

Weekly Summary : [Prosecution of the Freeman's Journal] 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 1)

The Freeman's Journal expresses its gratitude for the support being offered by that 'noble set of men', the 'warm -hearted Catholics of Bathurst'. The support, in the form of a public meeting, coincided with the prosecution of the Freeman's Journal's proprietors, by Attorney General James Martin, over non-compliance with registration regulations.

In order to properly defend itself in the case, the journal asks that 'those who may be in arrears with their subscriptions ...show their interest in the journal by settling their accounts with as little delay as possible'.

The Prosecution of the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 7)

This article, originally published in the Yass Courier, provides a detailed account of James Martin's prosecution of the proprietors of the Freeman's Journal. It asserts the view that 'the prosecution as it now stands has all the appearance of having been commenced because the paper has been a stern opponent of the present Administration, and has commented freely and unfavorably on the acts of every singe member of the Government ... It shall certainly not enhance the reputation of the Cabinet either individually or collectively, and we venture to predict that many days shall not pass ere a journal still more bitterly opposed to the existing Government shall spring from the ashes of this victim to legal tyranny and Ministerial ill-will'.

The Case against the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 9)

A lengthy explanation of the background to Premier and Attorney General James Martin's case against the Freeman's Journal.

Bathurst 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 8 August vol. 19 no. 1322 1868; (p. 9-10)

An extensive report on the 3 August 1868 meeting in Bathurst to consider 'the present crisis in the career of the Freeman's Journal and to propose a means of 'establishing another journal in its place should the present prosecution be successful'. (The prosecution is that instigated by Premier and Attorney General James Martin over the improper registration of the Freeman's Journal with the Supreme Court.)

The meeting resolved: 'That this meeting condemns the present action of the Government in prosecuting the Freeman's Journal, as it is their opinion that private animosity and not the vindication of the law is the object of the Attorney-General, and we hereby pledge ourselves to aid in the establishment of another Journal should the present prosecution be successful'.

A fund to support such a journal was started with a donation of ten guineas from Mr Richard Kenna.

Subscription List in Support of the Prosecution Fund for the `Freeman's Journal', List No. 1 1868 single work single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 8 August vol. 19 no. 1322 1868; (p. 15)

A column listing the names of Bathurst and district residents supporting the Freeman's Journal Prosecution Fund together with the amounts pledged.

The Freeman's Journal J. Sheridan Moore , 1857 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Empire , 21 January 1857; (p. 5)
The 'Freman's Journal Readers'[sic] i "One Reader cries, your strain's too grave:", Johnny Oldcove , 1850 single work poetry
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 3 October no. 15 1850; (p. 4)
Kendall's Satirical Humour Thomas Thornton Reed , 1982 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 42 no. 4 1982; (p. 363-384)
A Year in the Life of Victor Daley Frank Molloy , 2000 single work biography
— Appears in: Margin , July-August no. 51 2000; (p. 5-14)
The Freeman's Journal : Available Free of Charge at Holloway's 1868 single work advertisement
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 26 December vol. 19 no. 1342 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 19 December vol. 19 no. 1341 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 12 December vol. 19 no. 1340 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 31 October vol. 19 no. 1334 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 5 December vol. 19 no. 1339 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 24 October vol. 19 no. 1333 1868; (p. 16)

An advertisement advising that Freeman's Journal 'is filed and may be seen, free of charge, at Holloway's, 533, Oxford-street, W. C., (late of 224, Strand) London, where advertisements and subscriptions may be received'.

Agents for the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 26 December vol. 19 no. 1342 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 12 December vol. 19 no. 1340 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 31 October vol. 19 no. 1334 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 24 October vol. 19 no. 1333 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 5 December vol. 19 no. 1339 1868; (p. 16) The Freeman's Journal , 17 October vol. 19 no. 1332 1868; (p. 16)

A list of suburban, country and inter-colonial agents for the Freeman's Journal.

Town News : The 'Freeman's Journal' and the Liverpool Asylum 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 7 March vol. 19 no. 1300 1868; (p. 9)

The Freeman's Journal reports: 'A correspondent lately an inmate in the Liverpool Asylum, writes to inform us that he was forbidden by the master from reading the Freeman's Journal to a number of blind men who appeared to take some pleasure in listening to it. We are not aware of any regulations prohibiting the reading of newspapers in the asylum, and if there were, they should include the whole of the press.'

Ourselves 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 21 March vol. 19 no. 1302 1868; (p. 9)

The Freeman's Journal assures readers that rumours circulating about the journal and its proprietors are without foundation and 'were only circulated to injure us and the journal'. [The rumours began as a means of associating the Freeman's Journal with the Irishman O'Farrell who attempted to assassinate H. R. H. Prince Alfred, the Duke of Edinburgh.]

Weekly Summary [Dr Badham's University of Sydney Annual Commemoration Oration] 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 11 April vol. 19 no. 1305 1868; (p. 1)

The first item in the Freeman's Journal's weekly news summary concerns the oration delivered by the Rev. Dr Charles Badham, Professor of Classics and Logic, at the University of Sydney's Annual Commemoration. During his speech, Dr Badham attacked the Freeman's Journal and declared his (albeit mistaken) pleasure that the newspaper 'has ceased to exist'. The writer for the Freeman's Journal returns serve, pondering in what manner the journal might have offended Dr Badham and concluding: 'Fie! Reverend Doctor Badham, your temper has for once got the better of your classics and logic'.

Hartley 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 18 April vol. 19 no. 1306 1868; (p. 9-10)

A portion of the Freeman's Journal's correspondent's report from Hartley concerns reports that were 'rife' in the Lithgow district 'to the effect that the entire staff of the Freeman's Journal – from the "gents of the editorial corpse" (as Artemus Ward would say) down to the "type-stickers" – had "dislocated", leaving behind them nothing but half-finished leaders, dusty piles of back numbers, and masses of seditious-looking "pie".' The correspondent decries 'such silly nonsense ... as the intervention of some over-zealous admirer of Martin's awe-inspiring (?) liberty-extinguishing Act of 1868', that is, the Treason Felony Act.

Concerning Ourselves 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 25 April vol. 19 no. 1307 1868; (p. 8)

The Freeman's Journal reflects on the persecution it has faced, particularly since the March 1868 assassination attempt on H. R. H. Prince Alfred, as 'the only newspaper in Australia at all pretending to express the views of Irish Catholic Nationalists upon home and colonial matters'.

'Save and except in the withdrawal of the Government advertisements', the writer declares that 'the Freeman, so far from suffering, has gained considerably by the efforts made by the Government and their anti-Catholic sympathisers to crush it.'

Correspondence 'A Constant Reader' (fl. 1868) , 1868 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 9 May vol. 19 no. 1309 1868; (p. 9)

'A Constant Reader' writes to the Freeman's Journal highlighting the anti-Roman Catholic sentiment displayed in the pages of The Kiama Independent, and Shoalhaven Advertiser. The letter to the editor is followed by an extract from the Independent in which the Freeman's Journal is accused of exciting 'suspicions, hatred, and rancour among the various nationalities and creeds of the colony'.

The Freeman's Journal and the Martin Government 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 16 May vol. 19 no. 1310 1868; (p. 8)

A lengthy editorial piece on the prosecution of the proprietors of the Freeman's Journal on the grounds that the proprietors had not sworn an affidavit setting out their names with the Supreme Court. The writer argues that, since an affidavit was sworn before the Chief Justice on 29 December 1866, the failure to do the same at the Supreme Court was an unwitting and unintentional oversight. The writer can only conclude that the May 1868 prosecution of the case by the Crown Solicitor is an act instigated by New South Wales Premier James Martin in order to discredit the pro-Irish, pro-Roman Catholic newspaper.

Having subsequently complied with the law, and informing the Crown Solicitor of this fact, the proprietors received communication from the latter that the Attorney General will persist with the prosecution 'as he can find nothing in the statements [provided by the Freeman's Journal] ... to warrant him in foregoing the threatened proceedings'.

The writer for Freeman's surmises that the whole endeavour is designed by Martin (himself a Catholic of Irish descent) to 'embarrass, to cripple, or to crush' the Catholic publication. The premier 'has declared war with us simply because we express and propagate opinions unfavourable to his tenure of office, those opinions being shared in the vast majority of the Irish residents in this colony. He is sadly mistaken, however, if he fancies that he will achieve a triumph in this case.'

Country News : The Prosecution of the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 30 May vol. 19 no. 1312 1868; (p. 10)

The Freeman's Journal reproduces a column from the Tamworth Examiner that comments on plans by the Martin government to prosecute Freeman's for not being properly registered with the Supreme Court. (See 'The Freeman's Journal and the Martin Government' for further background.)

Parting Words E. F. (fl. 1868) , 1868 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 13 June vol. 19 no. 1314 1868; (p. 6-7)

'E. F.', who is about to depart the colony, pens [his] thoughts on the sectarian altercation existing between the Freeman's Journal and the Sydney Morning Herald, and on the treatment of the Freeman's at the hands of the premier, James Martin.

The correspondent wishes the Freeman's 'a glorious triumph' over Martin, and hopes that 'fairplay may again speedily reign in New South Wales'.

The Attorney General at the Prosecution of the Proprietors of the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 25 July vol. 19 no. 1320 1868; (p. 8)

An extended editorial on the legal prosecution against the proprietors of the Freeman's Journal by Attorney General, Sir James Martin. Martin claimed a total of £2408 8s in costs in the case.

Prosecution of the Freeman's Journal 1868 single work advertisement
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 1) The Bathurst Times , 29 August 1868;

An advertisement for a 'meeting of the Friends and Supporters of the Sydney Freeman's Journal'. The meeting coincided with the prosecution of the Freeman's Journal's proprietors, by Attorney General James Martin, over their non-compliance with registration regulations.

Weekly Summary : [Prosecution of the Freeman's Journal] 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 1)

The Freeman's Journal expresses its gratitude for the support being offered by that 'noble set of men', the 'warm -hearted Catholics of Bathurst'. The support, in the form of a public meeting, coincided with the prosecution of the Freeman's Journal's proprietors, by Attorney General James Martin, over non-compliance with registration regulations.

In order to properly defend itself in the case, the journal asks that 'those who may be in arrears with their subscriptions ...show their interest in the journal by settling their accounts with as little delay as possible'.

The Prosecution of the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 7)

This article, originally published in the Yass Courier, provides a detailed account of James Martin's prosecution of the proprietors of the Freeman's Journal. It asserts the view that 'the prosecution as it now stands has all the appearance of having been commenced because the paper has been a stern opponent of the present Administration, and has commented freely and unfavorably on the acts of every singe member of the Government ... It shall certainly not enhance the reputation of the Cabinet either individually or collectively, and we venture to predict that many days shall not pass ere a journal still more bitterly opposed to the existing Government shall spring from the ashes of this victim to legal tyranny and Ministerial ill-will'.

The Case against the 'Freeman's Journal' 1868 single work column
— Appears in: The Freeman's Journal , 1 August vol. 19 no. 1321 1868; (p. 9)

A lengthy explanation of the background to Premier and Attorney General James Martin's case against the Freeman's Journal.

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

Frequency:
  • Weekly on Thursdays 1850.
  • Twice-weekly 1851-1865.
  • Weekly from 1865.
Range:
27 June 1850 - 27 October 1932
Mergers:
Merged with the Catholic Press and later incorporated into the Catholic Weekly, 5 March 1942
Size:
Folio initially 8 pages for the first 14 issues then 12 pages, increased to 24 pages from 1865.
Price:
Original Terms of subscription from first issue: 5d each number, 5s per quarter or £1 per annum to be paid in advance. After 14 weeks the subscription rates increased to 6d each number, 6s per quarter or £1.4s per annum in advance.
Graphics:
No graphics
Advertising:
Includes advertising
Note:
'The oldest weekly newspaper in the Australasian colonies.'
Note:

'Irish-Catholic news and intelligence, original and selected articles on religious and general topics, selected poetry.'

Source: Australian Periodicals With Literary Content, 1821-1925. (2003).

Note:
Motto : 'In necessariis unitas, in duriis libertas, in omnibus caritas'
Note:

'The Freeman's Journal, was printed on an old hand-turned "mangle" in the gallery of St Mary's Seminary, in a building adjacent to the first St Mary's Cathedral.'

Source: www.catholicweekly.com.au/ (Sighted 11/11/2009).

Has serialised

Many Years Ago at Upfield, 1865 single work novella
The Doom of Warnham, 1868 single work novel
The Smuggler; a Tale of the West of Ireland, Founded on Fact, 1868 single work novel
Avice Arden : The Old Man's Romance, Gertrude Parsons , 1868 single work novel romance mystery A Man's Romance : A Tale
Can Right Be Wrong? : A Tale of Proselytism, Cecilia Mary Caddell , 1868 single work novel

A young girl of Roman Catholic parents has been in the care of a Protestant children's home. When her baby brother dies, a Roman Catholic woman of the parish intervenes, persuading the girl's mother to send her daughter to a Roman Catholic establishment. The mother agrees despite the child's objections to the Romanish ways of her new home. Gradually, the girl responds to the kindness of those in whose care she finds herself and she accepts the rituals and practices which had formerly been anathema to her.

Review : 'Les Odeurs de Paris', A. Laborde , 1868 review
— Review of Les Odeurs de Paris Louis Veuillot 1867 single work prose ;
Mildred and Love Sydnor, 1868 single work single work novel
The Harp of Erin, Henry Kendall , 1871 series - author essay
Notes upon Men and Books, Henry Kendall , 1871-1872 series - author essay
The Terra Incognita in the North : New Guinea, Henry Kendall , 1872 single work essay
Last amended 15 Oct 2014 12:33:06
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