Date: 1933-1939
Date: 1939-1950
Date: 1950-1972
Date: 1972-1975
Date: 1975-1976
Date: 1976-1985
Date: 1986-1987
Date: 1987-1993
Date: 1994-1999
Date: 2000-
Issue Details: First known date: 1933; Latest issue indexed: 2010 1933
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Latest Issues

y The Australian Women's Weekly November 2010 Z1756735 2010 periodical issue
y The Australian Women's Weekly February 2010 Z1757308 2010 periodical issue
y The Australian Women's Weekly August 2009 Z1619554 2009 periodical issue
y The Australian Women's Weekly February 2009 Z1630473 2009 periodical issue
y The Australian Women's Weekly March 2007 Z1392467 2007 periodical issue

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Founded by George Warnecke and R. C. Packer and designed with the assistance of John Hill and the cartoonist William Ernest Pidgeon, the Australian Women's Weekly began in a newspaper format in June 1933. At first only available in New South Wales, it soon became so popular that editions were introduced to all states. By 1937, a New Zealand edition was also being produced.

Aimed at the home maker, the Australian Women's Weekly has provided information and entertainment to several generations of Australian women. The frequent notion in articles and fiction (especially in the 1940s and 1950s) that matrimony was the fulfillment of a woman's life and that such a life was subservient to the male bread-winner has been scrutinised by feminist critics in recent decades. Several book-length studies and many articles have been produced that explore the social dynamics that can be inferred by the content of the magazine in its long history.

Fiction was a large component of the magazine in its early years, but that has diminished markedly since the early 1970s. Issues from the 1930s contained lively debates in letters and articles about the value of literature, and many poets and fiction writers were profiled. A series on 'Famous Women' included biographies of George Eliot, Aphra Behn, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Harriet Beecher Stowe.

The magazine began a long series of condensed novels in October 1934, exposing readers to many overseas writers and a number of local products such as Frank Dalby Davison, Henrietta Drake-Brockman and E. V. Timms. Around 250 novels had appeared in condensed form by 1940. In the 1940s the Weekly also distributed a series of illustrated children's books by non-Australian authors, published by The Shakespeare Head press, under the series title, Australian Women's Weekly Children's Classics. Titles in the series included Fairy Bluebell and Rosamond by Elizabeth Keith and Dandy Lion by Percy G. Griggs.

In July 1952, an author profile and a condensed version of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby was included. Readers continued to receive encouragement throughout the 1950s and 1960s with competitions, quizzes, advertisements and information about book clubs. Since 1970, the Australian Women's Weekly has continued to publish short stories and occasional poetry. The magazine has been a major sponsor of the Byron Bay Writers Festival since 2000.

Since 1970, the Australian Women's Weekly has undergone several changes of format and has included less conventional issues for the magazine such as contraception, sex and the environment. The Australian Women's Weekly remains one of the most dominant popular magazines for women in Australia, maintaining one of the world's highest circulations per capita.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1933

Works about this Work

An Unexpected Bequest Jill Brown , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Griffith Review , April no. 48 2015; (p. 79-82)
Making Room For An Icon 2012 single work column
— Appears in: Inside History , May-June no. 10 2012; (p. 32-33)
Editing Too Tough for Women? History Says No Harold Mitchell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 July 2012; (p. 8) The Age , 20 July 2012; (p. 6)
Pages for the Ages : A Quick Flick through History Steve Meacham , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 August 2011; (p. 16)
Steve Meacham reports on the National Library of Australia's completion of the digitisation of the Australian Women's Weekly and an exhibition featuring the iconic magazine.
What Women Wanted: Library Uncovers Colourful Past of the Weekly Sally Pryor , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 6 August 2011; (p. 9)
Sally Pryor reports on the In Every Home: The Australian Women's Weekly 1923-1982 exhibition. The exhibition, held at the National Library of Australia from 5 August 2011 to 5 August 2012, 'celebrates the Australian Women's Weekly as an extraordinary record of Australian popular culture now available online through Trove.
Weekly Wonders Sally Pryor , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 February 2010; (p. 8-9)
Death of the World Rowan Cahill , Terry Irving , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Radical Sydney : Places, Portraits and Unruly Episodes 2010; (p. 175-180)
'This is the story of how the labour movement lost a daily newspaper and was deceived into giving a leg-up to the Packers, the super-wealthy family that is now one of Australia’s main centres of business and political power.' (p. 175)
The Historiography of Reading in Australia Patrick Buckridge , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 139-151)
Patrick Buckridge explores the historiography of reading in Australia and presents a discussion of why, what and how Australians read.
From under Lino to Online, Every Day's a Weekly Sally Pryor , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 23 November 2010; (p. 4)
Ita Buttrose on Celebrity Ita Buttrose , 2008 single work essay
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 4-5 October 2008; (p. 33)
Advice to Women in the Australian Women's Weekly During the 1950s Ross Laurie , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Historical Society of Queensland , February vol. 20 no. 5 2008; (p. 188-194)
In the Wake of War : The Rise and Rise of Australia's Media Since 1918 Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Australian History : Perspectives on the Past Since 1788 2008; (p. 375-381)

'Lost in the traditional stories of Depression and unemployment is the extraordinary technological and media revolution that was taking place in Australia of the interwar years. For it was in these years that we now find the origins of the great media empires of the twentieth century: the house of Murdoch and Packer. It saw, too, the birth of widespread radio technology and the iconic Australian serial, The Australian Women's Weekly. Indeed, as Bridget Griffen-Foley demonstrates here, the 1920s and 1930s were far from being just an age of economic hardship. Rather, this was perhaps the first period in Australian history in which most citizens were afforded the opportunity to experience extraordinary new communications technology.'

y Margot Neville : Writing and Reading Australian Crime Fiction in the Fifties Rachel Palmer , Bundoora : 2005 Z1766966 2005 single work thesis This thesis examines four Australian crime fiction writers of the 1950s and explores in detail the life and writings of sisters Margot and Neville Ann Goyder, who wrote together under the pseudonym of Margot Neville. I also explore the sisters publishing relationship with the Australian Women's Weekly, and how their writings, and the fiction and articles in the Australian Women's Weekly, inform and complicate understandings of Australian life and society in the 1950s. Margot and Neville Ann Goyder wrote twenty two crime fiction novels in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. The novels were all set in Australia, with a distinctly Australian feel. The two sisters enjoyed a successful publishing career over twenty years. As well as the crime fiction novels, they also wrote short romance stories for many popular women's magazines of the 1950s.

In examining the works of Margot Neville, I explore the depictions of Australian middle-class life during the 1950s, and show that the picture they present of that time indicates a more complex and less conservative society than is usually presented by reviewers and commentators looking back on that time. The works of Margot Neville, both crime fiction novels and short stories, were published in the Australian Women's Weekly during the 1950s, and a critical review of the magazine also indicates a less conservative society than is presented today. The thesis also examines the theories surrounding the distinctive structure of crime fiction, a genre that has very clear conventions. While the structure of crime fiction is important, and a component demanded of its readership, the thesis maintains that a structural analysis does not identify an important aspect of the genre - that it always contemporary to the time in which it is written (rather than set), and therefore provides insight into the cultural aspects of the society in which it is set (Author's abstract).
Women's Weakly? Deborah Cameron , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 September 2003; (p. 33) The Age , 20 September 2003; (p. 8)
Cameron explores the changes to The Australian Women's Weekly over its 70 year publication history.
'Good Reading' in the Australian Womens's Weekly, 1933-1970 Patrick Buckridge , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 1 no. 2002; (p. 32-43)
A Turning Point for the Weekly and a Turning Point for Women? The Debate about Women and University in the Australian Women's Weekly in 1961. Lyndall Ryan , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies , June vol. 6 no. 1 2001; (p. 52-65)
'In 1961, the Australian Women's Weekly (AWW) was at the height of its popularity as the most widely read magazine in Australia. While it has been used as an ideological text to explore representations of women as active consumers in the postwar period, it has not been used as a cultural and social text to represent the contradictions in women's lives at that time. By focusing on the debate in the Weekly in February and March 1961 about the usefulness of a university education for young women, this paper demonstrates the magazine's importance as a major form of social discourse among women and its influence on shaping their aspirations. In placing this debate in a wider social context of rising expectations of women generally, this paper also shows how the Weekly represented, albeit unconsciously, contradictions in many women's lives that were beginning to surface in 1961. Yet because of its engagement with new forms of consumerism, it could only respond in limited ways. The paper concludes that 1961 was a turning point for women and the Weekly in finding new directions in a booming postwar economy.' (Lyndall Ryan).
y Who Was That Woman? : The Australian Women's Weekly in the Postwar Years Susan Sheridan , Barbara Baird , Kate Borrett , Lyndall Ryan , Sydney : University of NSW Press , 2001 Z921242 2001 single work criticism
The Weekly's Woman Jill Rowbotham , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Australian , 8 November 2001; (p. 13)
Midcentury Australia: Women and Journalism in the 1950s Sharyn Pearce , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Shameless Scribblers : Australian Women's Journalism 1880-1995 1998; (p. 129 -148)
Charmian Clift and the 'Sydney Morning Herald' Sharyn Pearce , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Shameless Scribblers : Australian Women's Journalism 1880-1995 1998; (p. 149 -184)
'Good Reading' in the Australian Womens's Weekly, 1933-1970 Patrick Buckridge , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 1 no. 2002; (p. 32-43)
Women's Weakly? Deborah Cameron , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20-21 September 2003; (p. 33) The Age , 20 September 2003; (p. 8)
Cameron explores the changes to The Australian Women's Weekly over its 70 year publication history.
The Australian Women's Weekly : Depression and the War Years Romance and Reality Andree Wright , 1973 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refractory Girl , Winter no. 3 1973; (p. 9-13)
y The Weekly : A Lively and Nostalgic Celebration of Australia Through 50 Years of its Most Popular Magazine Denis O'Brien , Ringwood : Penguin , 1982 Z1091174 1982 single work criticism
Ita Buttrose on Celebrity Ita Buttrose , 2008 single work essay
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 4-5 October 2008; (p. 33)
Advice to Women in the Australian Women's Weekly During the 1950s Ross Laurie , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of the Royal Historical Society of Queensland , February vol. 20 no. 5 2008; (p. 188-194)
A Turning Point for the Weekly and a Turning Point for Women? The Debate about Women and University in the Australian Women's Weekly in 1961. Lyndall Ryan , 2001 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies , June vol. 6 no. 1 2001; (p. 52-65)
'In 1961, the Australian Women's Weekly (AWW) was at the height of its popularity as the most widely read magazine in Australia. While it has been used as an ideological text to explore representations of women as active consumers in the postwar period, it has not been used as a cultural and social text to represent the contradictions in women's lives at that time. By focusing on the debate in the Weekly in February and March 1961 about the usefulness of a university education for young women, this paper demonstrates the magazine's importance as a major form of social discourse among women and its influence on shaping their aspirations. In placing this debate in a wider social context of rising expectations of women generally, this paper also shows how the Weekly represented, albeit unconsciously, contradictions in many women's lives that were beginning to surface in 1961. Yet because of its engagement with new forms of consumerism, it could only respond in limited ways. The paper concludes that 1961 was a turning point for women and the Weekly in finding new directions in a booming postwar economy.' (Lyndall Ryan).
The Australian Women's Weekly Today.. Shirley Sampson , 1973 single work criticism
— Appears in: Refractory Girl , Winter no. 3 1973; (p. 14-18)
In the Wake of War : The Rise and Rise of Australia's Media Since 1918 Bridget Griffen-Foley , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Making Australian History : Perspectives on the Past Since 1788 2008; (p. 375-381)

'Lost in the traditional stories of Depression and unemployment is the extraordinary technological and media revolution that was taking place in Australia of the interwar years. For it was in these years that we now find the origins of the great media empires of the twentieth century: the house of Murdoch and Packer. It saw, too, the birth of widespread radio technology and the iconic Australian serial, The Australian Women's Weekly. Indeed, as Bridget Griffen-Foley demonstrates here, the 1920s and 1930s were far from being just an age of economic hardship. Rather, this was perhaps the first period in Australian history in which most citizens were afforded the opportunity to experience extraordinary new communications technology.'

Weekly Wonders Sally Pryor , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 13 February 2010; (p. 8-9)
Death of the World Rowan Cahill , Terry Irving , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Radical Sydney : Places, Portraits and Unruly Episodes 2010; (p. 175-180)
'This is the story of how the labour movement lost a daily newspaper and was deceived into giving a leg-up to the Packers, the super-wealthy family that is now one of Australia’s main centres of business and political power.' (p. 175)
The Historiography of Reading in Australia Patrick Buckridge , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Modern Australian Criticism and Theory 2010; (p. 139-151)
Patrick Buckridge explores the historiography of reading in Australia and presents a discussion of why, what and how Australians read.
From under Lino to Online, Every Day's a Weekly Sally Pryor , 2010 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 23 November 2010; (p. 4)
y Margot Neville : Writing and Reading Australian Crime Fiction in the Fifties Rachel Palmer , Bundoora : 2005 Z1766966 2005 single work thesis This thesis examines four Australian crime fiction writers of the 1950s and explores in detail the life and writings of sisters Margot and Neville Ann Goyder, who wrote together under the pseudonym of Margot Neville. I also explore the sisters publishing relationship with the Australian Women's Weekly, and how their writings, and the fiction and articles in the Australian Women's Weekly, inform and complicate understandings of Australian life and society in the 1950s. Margot and Neville Ann Goyder wrote twenty two crime fiction novels in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. The novels were all set in Australia, with a distinctly Australian feel. The two sisters enjoyed a successful publishing career over twenty years. As well as the crime fiction novels, they also wrote short romance stories for many popular women's magazines of the 1950s.

In examining the works of Margot Neville, I explore the depictions of Australian middle-class life during the 1950s, and show that the picture they present of that time indicates a more complex and less conservative society than is usually presented by reviewers and commentators looking back on that time. The works of Margot Neville, both crime fiction novels and short stories, were published in the Australian Women's Weekly during the 1950s, and a critical review of the magazine also indicates a less conservative society than is presented today. The thesis also examines the theories surrounding the distinctive structure of crime fiction, a genre that has very clear conventions. While the structure of crime fiction is important, and a component demanded of its readership, the thesis maintains that a structural analysis does not identify an important aspect of the genre - that it always contemporary to the time in which it is written (rather than set), and therefore provides insight into the cultural aspects of the society in which it is set (Author's abstract).
Pages for the Ages : A Quick Flick through History Steve Meacham , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 3 August 2011; (p. 16)
Steve Meacham reports on the National Library of Australia's completion of the digitisation of the Australian Women's Weekly and an exhibition featuring the iconic magazine.
What Women Wanted: Library Uncovers Colourful Past of the Weekly Sally Pryor , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 6 August 2011; (p. 9)
Sally Pryor reports on the In Every Home: The Australian Women's Weekly 1923-1982 exhibition. The exhibition, held at the National Library of Australia from 5 August 2011 to 5 August 2012, 'celebrates the Australian Women's Weekly as an extraordinary record of Australian popular culture now available online through Trove.
Making Room For An Icon 2012 single work column
— Appears in: Inside History , May-June no. 10 2012; (p. 32-33)
Editing Too Tough for Women? History Says No Harold Mitchell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 20 July 2012; (p. 8) The Age , 20 July 2012; (p. 6)
Midcentury Australia: Women and Journalism in the 1950s Sharyn Pearce , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Shameless Scribblers : Australian Women's Journalism 1880-1995 1998; (p. 129 -148)
Charmian Clift and the 'Sydney Morning Herald' Sharyn Pearce , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Shameless Scribblers : Australian Women's Journalism 1880-1995 1998; (p. 149 -184)

PeriodicalNewspaper Details

ISSN: 0005-0458
Frequency:
Weekly (1933-1983); Monthly (1983- )
Range:
1933-
Size:
39-46cm

Has serialised

Solo for Several Players, Barbara Jefferis , 1961 single work novel

'A variation on a theme – a plane aloft and a lone occupant who does not know how to fly – has an Australian setting, a four way communication set-up, and constant climax build-up. An accident causes Dick Garnett to kick the throttle of his Piper Tri-pacer and his fiancee, Janet, who hates flying, finds herself airborne, alone. Dick organizes the flying doctor base and Dave Jordan, who finally gets into touch by radio with Janet, calms her into learning the instrument panel, and makes arrangements for the flying field to stand by (she cannot land on the sheep station strip because floods will not permit an ambulance to get through). Janet, ready to break her engagement to Dick, will only listen to his brother but her fumblings bring Dick back to drive her into cooperation so that he can "talk her down". How he gets her to repeat flying manoeuvers until she is ready to head for the distant field, keeps her on course while maintaining the all-out radio contact, and waits for word of her landing...adds up to an aerial melodrama that does not let go.'

Source: Kirkus Reviews (https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/barbara-jefferis-4/solo-for-several-players/).

The Lonely Shore, Freda Vines , 1958 single work novel historical fiction
Victorian Family Robinson : A Novel, Beatrice Grimshaw , 1934 single work novel

'BEATRICE GRIMSHAW, masterly spinner of South Sea yarns, makes the utmost of her ingeniously-woven story of castaways on a South Sea isle. The novel palpitates with romance and rocks with comedy. Tragedy stalks the pages, and is caught by "Laughter holding both his sides."

REV. JAMES ROBINSON, widower and model of mid-Victorian propriety, has two beautiful daughters. ELEANOR, the elder, is handsome and conventionally-minded; ADELINE, the younger, is timid, clinging, frail, and romantic.

There is a furore in the household when Adeline falls in love with a dashing cavalry officer who is MARRIED! The vicar receives an appointment to an Australian bishopric and sails with his girls "out of harm's way!" They are cast away on a remote South Sea island with LADY GILLILAND, wife of the Governor-General of Australia, CHARLIE CHAINE, the very same cavalry officer whom Adeline so indiscreetly loved, brawny sailorman BUZACOTT, and MR. and MRS. GERALD BLACK. Mr. Black is a champion runner.

A boatload of amazing English-speaking men—themselves descendants of castaways and suffering, in their island Paradise, from an acute shortage of Eves—is an unusual dramatic touch.'

Source: Blurb for the Australian Women's Weekly serialisation, 9 February 1935, p.5.

Find a Crooked Sixpence, Estelle Thompson , 1970 single work novel crime detective
In Love with a Murderer? ‘To help out old friends, Dr. Jacqueline Freeman agrees to take over a small practice in the Australian town of Willowbank for one year. Outwardly, conditions are pleasant enough, but Jackie soon finds out that the townspeople have far from forgotten the unsolved murder, which happened one year before, of the beautiful wife of one Carl Shader. The young doctor is unwittingly drawn into the mystery, partly from a natural curiosity to know the truth and partly because of an immediate attraction to Carl Shrader – the man everyone believes to be the killer.’ (Publisher’s blurb)
Sweet Night for Murder, 'Margot Neville' , 1959 single work novel crime detective

Sweet Night for Murder tells how young and pretty Cathy Simpson comes to Sydney to spend a few weeks with friends before her marriage to wealthy grazier Roger Clements. But it is with horror that her friends Keith and Jess Watson find her murdered on their terrace one beautiful summer evening. However, when Inspector Grogan and Sergeant Manning, of the Sydney C.I.B., start their inquiries, a trail of deceit and even blackmail is unearthed, and it seems that many of Cathy's so-called friends have good reason to dislike and even fear her. But with their usual calm investigations Grogan and Manning manage to ascertain the identity of the murderer as the story comes to a thrilling ending (The Australian Women's Weekly, 31 August 1960).

The Seagull Said Murder, 'Margot Neville' , 1952 single work novel crime detective
Murder to Welcome Her, 'Margot Neville' , 1957 single work novel crime detective Murder Was Her Welcome
Murder of a Nymph, 'Margot Neville' , 1949 single work novel crime detective The Case of Come-Hither Bend
Eve's Daughter, Louise Mack , 1933 single work novel romance

'Lilian Desmond, a beautiful golden-haired English painter, married twice, both husbands killed in the War. It seems to her as if all hope and joy are ended forever. She comes out to New Zealand in search of a new world to paint. She has renounced love and has turned to art as her only solace. She stays in the home of the Ewings, mother and son, whom she takes to be poor, simple people.' (Australian Women's Weekly, v1:6, 1933 p. 7)

Common People, A. E. Martin , 1943 single work novel crime detective
Sinners Never Die, A. E. Martin , 1944 single work novel crime detective Old Sinners Never Die
Murder and Gardenias, 'Margot Neville' , 1946 single work novel crime detective The Gardenia Case
Death in the Limelight, A. E. Martin , 1946 single work novel crime detective A Thousand Looked On
Murder in a Blue Moon, 'Margot Neville' , 1948 single work novel crime detective The Cliffside Case
A Town Like Alice, Nevil Shute , 1950 single work novel
Murder Before Marriage, 'Margot Neville' , 1951 single work novel crime detective Cyanide for Supper
Murder and Poor Jenny, 'Margot Neville' , 1954 single work novel crime detective
' Many men were in love with attractive Jenny -so she didn't lack help and sympathy when a murdered body was found in her flat. But Jenny was a paradox, and our old friends, Detective-Inspector Grogan and Sergeant Manning are faced with a big problem when they come to investigate this particularly baffling murder (Australian Women's Weekly 26 January 1955 p.47 ).
Murder of Olympia, 'Margot Neville' , 1956 single work novel crime detective
Goodbye, Sweet William, Pat Flower , 1959 single work novel crime
The Flame of Murder, 'Margot Neville' , 1958 single work novel crime detective
Last amended 2 Mar 2015 16:11:01
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