1112884196498241503.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
y The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith single work   novel   historical fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1972 1972
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'When Jimmie Blacksmith marries a white woman, the backlash from both Jimmie's tribe and white society initiates a series of dramatic events. As Jimmie tries to survive between two cultures, tensions reach a head when the Newbys, Jimmie's white employers, try to break up his marriage. The Newby women are murdered and Jimmie flees, pursued by police and vigilantes. The hunt intensifies as further murders are committed, and concludes with tragic results. Thomas Keneally's fictionalised account of the 1900 killing spree of half-Aboriginal Jimmy Governor is a powerful story of a black man's revenge against an unjust and intolerant society. ' (Publication summary)

Adaptations

form y The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Fred Schepisi , Melbourne : The Film House , 1978 Z864554 1978 single work film/TV (taught in 3 units)

Based on real events that occurred in Australia at the turn of the century and adapted from Thomas Keneally's novel, The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith concerns a young man of Aboriginal and European heritage who has been raised by missionaries. A hard and reliable worker, Jimmie is employed on a property in central-western New South Wales. Hoping to achieve assimiliation into white society, Jimmy marries a white girl, but instead this only increases the loathing and ridicule directed at him. In the winter of 1900, an argument ensues between Jimmy and the owner of the property, which leads to Jimmie and his uncle horrifically killing most of the man's family. Jimmie subsequently takes to the bush with his wife, baby, and younger brother, Mort. Pursued by the police and vigilante farmers, Jimmie sends his wife back with a message: 'tell them I've declared war.' He and Mort kill again, but the younger brother becomes increasingly troubled by their actions. Jimmie eventually goes on alone until his inevitable capture and hanging.

Notes

  • Dedication: To the Memory of Peter Cady [died] January, 1971.
  • Adapted for the 1978 film The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith directed by Fred Schepisi. Screenplay by Fred Schepisi.
  • Study guide available.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking , 1972 .
      Extent: 178p.
      ISBN: 0670211656
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1973 .
      Extent: 178p.p.
      ISBN: 0140036202
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Ballantine Books , 1973 .
      Extent: 215p.
      ISBN: 0345235584
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins , 1978 .
      Extent: 178p.p.
      ISBN: 0006145086
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fontana , 1978 .
      Extent: 178p.
      Reprinted: 1984
      ISBN: 0006540937
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Penguin , 1983 .
      Extent: 178p.p.
      ISBN: 0140069739
    • Kensington, Randwick area, Sydney Eastern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Times House , 1986 .
      Extent: 178p.p.
      ISBN: 0858359847
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Flamingo , 1999 .
      Extent: 178p.p.
      ISBN: 0732266823
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2001 .
      Extent: 178p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Part of A & R Classic Series
      ISBN: 0207197164
    • South Sydney area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2013 .
      Extent: 1 v.p.
      ISBN: 9781743099308 (ebook)
Alternative title: Balada o Jimmiem Blacksmithovi
Language: Slovak

Works about this Work

26 Aussie Books You Must Read Blanche Clark , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 24 January 2015; (p. 18-19)
'With Australia Day upons us...26 great Australian Books that have helped shape and define our nation...'
'The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith' by Thomas Keneally for Reading Australia Tony Birch , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , June-July no. 372 2015; (p. 50-52)
'Thomas Keneally’s novel The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1972) is based in part on historical events, particularly the crimes committed by Jimmy Governor, an Aboriginal man from New South Wales. In 1900, Governor was a key figure involved in the killing of nine Europeans, including five women and children. The killings followed Governor’s marriage to a young white woman and taunts from the Mawbey household where they both worked. After fourteen weeks on the run with his brother Joe, Governor was arrested and sentenced to death for the murders. He was hanged at Darlinghurst Gaol on 14 January 1901, days after the declaration and ‘birth’ of the Australian nation. It is widely accepted that Governor’s execution was delayed so as not to spoil the birthday party.' (Author's introduction)
An Interview with Thomas Keneally : The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith and the Politics of Australian Aboriginality Bruce Harding (interviewer), 2015 single work interview
— Appears in: Journal of Postcolonial Writing , vol. 51 no. 3 2015; (p. 310-323)
'Thomas Keneally is one of Australia’s best-known novelists, with a reputation as a popular but serious writer both at home and abroad. In 1972, the publication of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, his fictional reconstruction of the axe murders of the half-caste aboriginal, Jimmy Governor, in 1900, a dark episode in the history of Australian–Aboriginal relations, brought him local fame. In this interview with Bruce Harding undertaken in New Zealand in 1984, Keneally, with the hindsight then of 12 years, reflects on the novel as a reassessment of social and political change, and considers race relations more generally, before turning to his early career, his break with Catholicism and his attitude towards Australia’s convict past. Harding’s opening and closing commentaries provide historical contexts for the novel’s story and its moment of publication, which coincided with the initial euphoria of the Whitlam years.' (Publication abstract)
A National (Diasporic?) Living Treasure : Thomas Keneally Paul Sharrad , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , November no. 14 2015; (p. 20-27)
Although Thomas Keneally is firmly located as a national figure, his international literary career and his novels’ inspection of colonial exile, Aboriginal alienation, and movements of people throughout history reflect aspects of diasporic experience, while pushing the term itself into wider meaning of the transnational.
Literature : A Step in the Right Direction Noela McNamara , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic , vol. 13 no. 1 2014;
'Literature offers the opportunity to encounter worlds beyond one’s own circumstances, environment, and situation. As an intercultural phenomenon, literary critique and analysis without borders can only be achieved by recognising cultural borders. Reading the literature of different cultures opens literary discourses to cross-cultural dialogue, but for too long, the lack of Indigenous literature within Australian literary discourses stymied the social potential of this intercultural phenomenon. Pressure from the global literary community has necessitated a vast shift of white consciousness to actively embrace narratives of different cultural dimensions, and novels that highlight cultural borders have become a key feature of Australian literature. Invisible literary borders have become apparent through exposure to the once silent voices that now emphasise messages of difference. Indigenous writers including Alexis Wright, Sally Morgan, Kim Scott, Jackie Huggins, Anita Heiss, Larissa Behrendt and Alice Nannup have opened reader consciousness to a broad scope of Indigenous perspectives. Within the arena of literary theories, the writer, reader and novels themselves have all had moments of glory, and while particular texts or authors have been immortalised, others have slipped into oblivion. Through the first person narrative of a non-Indigenous woman, this paper reveals how an intercultural literary experience revealed the restrictions of standard literary critique practices and inspired the creation of a relational discourse to engage with Indigenous voices as part of a methodological process. This intercultural literary process has the potential to inspire cultural awareness through acceptance and understanding of difference to overcome cultural unconsciousness. Such development has the capacity to destabilise invisible borders embedding lasting change in the consciousness of Australian readers and provide a foundational and fundamental step toward sustainable outcomes for Indigenous people.' (Publication summary)
Now for the Movie Anneli Knight , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: Australian Author , April vol. 45 no. 1 2013; (p. 26-29)
'When the film producer calls, asking to option your book, many authors feel a shiver of excitement. Five or even ten years later, many of them are still waiting. The process of adaptation can be even more tortuous than writing a book in the first place as prominent authors tell Anneli Knight.'
Traduit de l’américain : Thomas Keneally and the Mechanics of an International Career David Carter , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Book History , vol. 16 no. 2013; (p. 364-386)

'Internationally, Thomas Keneally is one of Australia’s most successful authors, whether in terms of critical reception, book sales, or author profile. He is probably best known as the author of Schindler’s List from 1982—Schindler’s Ark in Britain and Australasia—even if his fame in this regard has been somewhat obscured by Stephen Spielberg’s multi-Oscar-winning movie of 1993. The story of how Keneally came to write this book and its subsequent success is one of the more remarkable episodes in Australian book history, and of course it is by no means confined to Australia, its point of origin only in a very qualified sense. Published simultaneously in London, New York, and Sydney, Schindler’s List appeared in at least eight different English-language and fourteen foreign-language editions even before the release of Spielberg’s movie. It won the Booker Prize for 1982, the first by an Australian novelist, although Keneally had already been short-listed for the award on three occasions. Across the Atlantic, it was one of the New York Times ’ Best Books of 1982, and in the following year the winner of the Los Angeles Times Fiction Prize. The movie’s success meant new English and American editions together with a dozen or so translations in 1994 alone, including Turkish, Japanese, Chinese, and Catalan versions. New Czech and Marathi editions appeared as recently as 2009.' (Author's introduction)

Which World, and Why Do We Worry about It? Paul Sharrad , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Scenes of Reading : Is Australian Literature a World Literature? 2013; (p. 16-33)

In addressing the question of 'whether or not Australian literature is a world literature', Paul Sharrad looks at three scenes of reading: 'first, the public arena of the literary industry; second, the scenes of our own academic reading; third, the scenes that may result if we do move towards a world literature framework for reading Australian literature' (p.16). His discussion is illustrated with analysis of overseas reception of works by Thomas Keneally and a number of Aboriginal writers.

Posts in a Paddock : Revisiting the Jimmy Governor Tragedy, Approaching Reconciliation and Connecting Families Through the Medium of Theatre Clare Britton , 2013 single work essay criticism
— Appears in: The Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia , vol. 4 no. 1 2013; (p. 143-157)

'A descendent of the O’Brien family, closely related to those who suffered tragic

irretrievable loss at the hands of Jimmy Governor when he murdered a pregnant women and her toddler child in 1900, recounts her family’s journey of reconciliation. The sight of the “posts in a paddock”, the remains of the original homestead in which the deaths occurred and the only disappearing reminder of this tragedy on what is still the family farm near Wollar, north-east of Mudgee NSW, moved the author to explore the stories from her family and also from the Governor family. This realization took her on a journey to gather up, and introduce to each other, members of both families and to workshop their stories as a means of seeking a resolution to the tragedy. This journey eventually came to include descendants of Jimmy and Ethel Governor and led to reconciliation through participation in the development and performance of a play. The final outcome is a theatre piece marked by interracial collaboration and establishing common ground through intercultural dialogue,understanding and an overriding shared wish for reconciliation.' (Source: abstract)

Words, Sticks and Stones : Keneally, Literature and Social Impact Paul Sharrad , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , November vol. 28 no. 4 2013; (p. 90-105)
Hybridity, Power Discourse and Evolving Representations of Aboriginality (1970s - Today) Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 26 no. 1 2012; (p. 29-34)
'This essay examines the changing role played by the politicized concept of hybridity in filmic representations of Aboriginal identity over the past four decades...' (29)
Dscendants Rework Jimmy's Tragedy Bridget Cormack , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 7 November 2011; (p. 5)
Leroy Parsons Keeps His Jimmy Governor Role as Part of Family Bridget Cormack , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 23 November vol. 10 no. 244 2011; (p. 16)
The Haunting of Settler Australia : Kate Grenville's The Secret River Sheila Collingwood-Whittick , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 125-142)
In this essay, Sheila Collingwood-Whittick states: 'Kate Grenville's The Secret River, an elegantly-written, meticulously-crafted and extremely readable novel, provides a classic example of white Australian anxiety and ambivalence over the nation's origins. More significantly perhaps, and in direct contradiction with the author's declarations about her book, The Secret River is paradigmatic both of the difficulty settler descendants have in facing some of the grim truths of colonial history, and of their consequent inability to exorcise the ghosts that haunt the national conscience.' (p. 126)
y Black and White on Black : Whiteness and Masculinity in the Works of Three Australian Writers Thomas Keneally, Colin Thiele, and Patrick White Matthew Israel Byrge , Tennessee : 2010 Z1891564 2010 single work thesis 'White depictions of Aborigines in literature have generally been culturally biased. In this study I explore four depictions of Indigenous Australians by white Australian writers. Thomas Keneally's The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1972) depicts a half-caste Aborigine's attempt to enter white society in a racially-antipathetic world that precipitates his ruin. Children's author Colin Thiele develops friendships between white and Aboriginal children in frightening and dangerous landscapes in both Storm Boy (1963) and Fire in the Stone (1973). Nobel laureate Patrick White sets A Fringe of Leaves (1976) in a world in which Ellen Roxburgh's quest for freedom comes only through her captivity by the Aborigines. I use whiteness and masculinity studies as theoretical frameworks in my analysis of these depictions. As invisibility and ordinariness are endemic to white and masculine actions, interrogating these ideological constructions aids in facilitating a better awareness of the racialized stereotypes that exist in Indigenous representations.' (Author's abstract)
Perception, Convention, Expectation and Transformation : Representations of Aborigines in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Creative Nation : Australian Cinema and Cultural Studies Reader 2009; (p. 253-277)
Inconvenient Truths Rosemary Neill , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 27-28 June 2009; (p. 6-7)
'While Australian filmmakers and drama producers are beginning to acquaint audiences with the brutal facts of life in many remote communities, the same cannot be said of Australian novelists.'
Religion, Class and Nation in Contemporary Australian Fiction Stella Borgk Barthet , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 31 no. 1 2009; (p. 83-94)
'This article tackles the charge of elitism levelled at some Australian writers by Australian critics and suggests that these assessments may be biased because of an over-emphasis on class. This kind of criticism connects elitism with the writers' appropriation of the spiritual for the endorsement of the nation, and either rejects works that treat the spiritual, or it refuses to acknowledge a spiritual element in writing that is accepted for its working-class ethos. Through readings of David Malouf's The Conversation at Curlow Creek and Thomas Keneally's A Family Madness and The Office of Innocence, I question the connection that has been made between high literariness and the symbolic endorsement of the White nation in Australia.' Source: The author.
Keneally the Mapper : Keneally’s Settings and Australian National Identity Xiaojin Zhou , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: From Fixity to Fluidity : The Theme of Identity in Thomas Keneally's Fiction 2009; (p. 85-93)
'Keneally is not known as a pastoralist or a romanticist. In terms of the Australian land, his uniqueness lies not in picturesque descriptions of the landscape, but in outlining a larger framework in which to consider the Australian sense of place, and in searching for possible communications between man and land, upon which a sound identity, both personal and national, can be established. ' (85)
Keneally’s Aboriginal Characters Xiaojin Zhou , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: From Fixity to Fluidity : The Theme of Identity in Thomas Keneally's Fiction 2009; (p. 134-142)
'In the huge corpus of Keneally’s works, there is a group of impressive Aboriginal characters; some are minor ones and others are protagonists. In particular, three novels are noted for their outstanding and substantial portrayal of Aborigines, The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith in 1972, The Playmaker in 1987, and Flying Hero Class in 1991. Interestingly, the three stories take place respectively in three important stages of Australian history, one in colonial times in 1789, one in 1901, and one shortly before the dawn of the new millennium. With his sustaining interest in this subject, Keneally tries to present a panoramic view of Aboriginal images with a historical vision. ' (134)
New Novels John McLaren , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 52 1972; (p. 52-53)

— Review of The Wire Classroom John Bailey 1972 single work novel ; The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel ; So Far No Further : a novel Judah Waten 1971 single work novel
Untitled W. A. Murray , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , September vol. 11 no. 1972; (p. 8-9)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Ignorance and Savagery Barbara Jefferis , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Hemisphere , October vol. 16 no. 10 1972; (p. 37)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The National Times , 17-22 April 1972; (p. 21)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled Michael Costigan , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Review , 8-14 April 1972; (p. 701)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled V. Cunningham , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Listener , vol. 88 no. 1972; (p. 345)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
His Country's Contradictions Carl Harrison-Ford , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 8 April vol. 94 no. 4799 1972; (p. 44-45)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled Hope Hewitt , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 6 May 1972; (p. 13)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled Derryn Hinch , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The National Times , 30 October-4 November 1972; (p. 37)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled M. Jones , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 15 April 1972; (p. 23)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled Brian Kiernan , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 8 April 1972; (p. 16)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled A. Mitchell , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 8 April 1972; (p. 16)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The National Times , 17-22 April 1972; (p. 21)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled D. J. O'Hearn , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 8 April 1972; (p. 12)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
From the Marrow C. Porterfield , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Time , 28 August 1972; (p. 58,60)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 15 September 1972; (p. 1041)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled Anthony Thwaite , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 27 August 1972; (p. 3,24)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled S. Toulson , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: New Statesman , vol. 84 no. 1972; (p. 295)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled J. Yardley , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Book World , 12 August vol. 6 no. 33 1972; (p. 8)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Untitled W. Pradhan , 1972 single work review
— Appears in: Union Recorder , vol. 52 no. 1972; (p. 171-2)

— Review of The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Thomas Keneally 1972 single work novel
Thomas Keneally's The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith and the Palimpsest of Jimmy Governor Sue Ryan-Fazilleau , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , vol. 25 no. 1 2002; (p. 27-39)
Author's abstract : In The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, Keneally rewrites the story of the Jimmy Governor murders and manhunt, a significant episode in white/Aboriginal race relations in Australia that took place at the turn of the twentieth century. In his narrative Keneally attempts to eliminate the colonial discourse which underlay contemporary press accounts of the story and to retell it 'objectively', from the enlightened perspective of the 1970s, when white attitudes to Aborigines began to change radically. This article examines and attempts to explain his successes and failures in this under taking.
Caught Between Two Worlds Chris Elmore , 2003 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 2 April 2003; (p. 7)
The Borrowers Thomas Keneally , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Age , 30 August 2003; (p. 8)
Keneally and Gare: Boundary Riders and Fringedwellers Kay Ferres , 1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 14 no. 2 1986; (p. 48-56)
When the Past Is Always Present Juliette Hughes , 2005 single work essay
— Appears in: The Age , 13 August 2005; (p. 8)
The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith : Thomas Keneally (1935- ) Jane Gleeson-White , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Classics : Fifty Great Writers and Their Celebrated Works 2007; (p. 254-258)
Extinction, Resistance and Rebirth : The Representation of Aboriginality in 'The Timeless Land', 'The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith' and 'Benang' Isabelle Benigno , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Fact and Fiction : Readings in Australian Literature 2008; (p. 111-120)
y The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Henry Reynolds , Strawberry Hills : Currency Press National Film and Sound Archive , 2008 Z1491067 2008 single work criticism

'Set in central-western New South Wales in the 1890s, Fred Schepisi’s film of Thomas Keneally’s award-winning novel is a powerful and confronting story of a black man’s revenge against an unjust and intolerant society.

'Raised by missionaries, Jimmie Blacksmith, a young half-caste Aboriginal man, is poignantly caught between the ways of his black forefathers and those of the white society to which he aspires. Exploited by his boss and betrayed by his [white] wife, he declares war on his white employers and goes on a violent killing spree.

'The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith was one of the most significant films of the 1970s ‘renaissance’. It was the first Australian feature in which the whole story is told from an Aboriginal perspective and it broke new ground in dealing with one of the most tragic aspects of Australian history: the racist treatment of the Aboriginal population. The spectre of the violent and vengeful black had barely been touched upon and the depth of rage that the film put on screen was unprecedented in Australian film at the time.' (Publication summary)

The Truth about the Fiction James Massola , 2008 single work column
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 26 April 2008; (p. 8)
True Tales That Nurture: Defining Auto/Biographical Storytelling Donna Lee Brien , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Folklore , November vol. 19 no. 2004; (p. 84-95)
Searching for Aboriginal Fictional Characters Garry P. Dalrymple , 2008 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Koori Mail , 10 September no. 434 2008; (p. 24)
Reconsidering Fred Schepisi's The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith (1978) : The Screen Adaptation of Thomas Keneally's Novel (1972) Janet Wilson , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 1 no. 2 2007; (p. 191-207)
Perception, Convention, Expectation and Transformation : Representations of Aborigines in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Creative Nation : Australian Cinema and Cultural Studies Reader 2009; (p. 253-277)
Inconvenient Truths Rosemary Neill , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 27-28 June 2009; (p. 6-7)
'While Australian filmmakers and drama producers are beginning to acquaint audiences with the brutal facts of life in many remote communities, the same cannot be said of Australian novelists.'
A Colonial Tragedy and Its Resultant New England Myth J. S. Ryan , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Tales from New England 2008; (p. 69-101)
Religion, Class and Nation in Contemporary Australian Fiction Stella Borgk Barthet , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 31 no. 1 2009; (p. 83-94)
'This article tackles the charge of elitism levelled at some Australian writers by Australian critics and suggests that these assessments may be biased because of an over-emphasis on class. This kind of criticism connects elitism with the writers' appropriation of the spiritual for the endorsement of the nation, and either rejects works that treat the spiritual, or it refuses to acknowledge a spiritual element in writing that is accepted for its working-class ethos. Through readings of David Malouf's The Conversation at Curlow Creek and Thomas Keneally's A Family Madness and The Office of Innocence, I question the connection that has been made between high literariness and the symbolic endorsement of the White nation in Australia.' Source: The author.
Aboriginal Representations in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 2 no. 1 1987;
The Haunting of Settler Australia : Kate Grenville's The Secret River Sheila Collingwood-Whittick , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Ghosts 2010; (p. 125-142)
In this essay, Sheila Collingwood-Whittick states: 'Kate Grenville's The Secret River, an elegantly-written, meticulously-crafted and extremely readable novel, provides a classic example of white Australian anxiety and ambivalence over the nation's origins. More significantly perhaps, and in direct contradiction with the author's declarations about her book, The Secret River is paradigmatic both of the difficulty settler descendants have in facing some of the grim truths of colonial history, and of their consequent inability to exorcise the ghosts that haunt the national conscience.' (p. 126)
Dscendants Rework Jimmy's Tragedy Bridget Cormack , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Australian , 7 November 2011; (p. 5)
Leroy Parsons Keeps His Jimmy Governor Role as Part of Family Bridget Cormack , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: National Indigenous Times , 23 November vol. 10 no. 244 2011; (p. 16)
Last amended 3 Jun 2014 11:13:42
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