y A Treasury of Bush Verse anthology   poetry   humour  
Issue Details: First known date: 1991 1991
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Contents

* Contents derived from the North Ryde, Ryde - Gladesville - Hunters Hill area, Northwest Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1991 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
My Countryi"The love of field and coppice,", Dorothea Mackellar , 1908 single work poetry (p. 1-2)
Botany Bayi"Farewell to old England for ever,", 1885 single work poetry Botany Bay I (p. 3-4)
The Wild Colonial Boyi"'Tis of a wild Colonial boy, Jack Doolan was his name", 1905 single work poetry

'The Wild Colonial Boy' is a traditional Irish/Australian ballad of which there are many different versions. It has been argued that the original version was really about Jack Donahoe (variously spelled Donahoo or Donahue), an Irish transport who arrived at Sydney Cove in 1825, and was subsequently convicted of highway robbery and sentenced to death. He escaped and waged a guerrilla war against the wealthy for more than two years in the country around Sydney. On September 1st 1830 he was ambushed by a police party near Cambelltown and shot dead, his companions Webber and Warmsley escaping into the bush. This version was eventually outlawed as seditious so the name of the protagonist changed.

The resulting Irish version is about a young emigrant, named Jack Duggan, who left the town of Castlemaine, County Kerry, Ireland, for Australia in the 1800s. According to the song (and in keeping with the true story of Jack Donahoe), he spent his time there 'robbing from the rich to feed the poor'. In the song, the protagonist is fatally wounded in an ambush when his heart is pierced by the bullet of Fitzroy.

The Australian version has Jack Doolan (or sometimes Jack Dowling) as the protagonist, and here Castlemaine refers to the Australian town in Victoria. In both versions variation in the wording and language occurs across different sources.

In his Old Bush Songs, Banjo Patterson wrote: "it will be noticed that the same chorus is sung to both 'The Wild Colonial Boy' and 'Bold Jack Donahoo'. Several versions of both songs were sent in, but the same chorus was always made to do duty for both songs." This chorus, included in some (not all) Australian versions is as follows:


Come, all my hearties,

we'll roam the mountains high,

Together we will plunder,

together we will die.

We'll wander over valleys,

and gallop over plains,

And we'll scorn to live in

slavery, bound down with iron chains.

(p. 4-5)
The Overlanderi"There's a trade you all know well -", 1894 single work poetry (p. 6-8)
The Banks of the Condaminei"Oh, hark the dogs are barking, love,", 1956-1964 single work poetry (p. 9-10)
Stringy Bark and Green Hidei"I sing of a commodity, it's one that will not fail yer,", George Chanson , 1956-1967 single work poetry (p. 10-11)
The Old Bullock Drayi"Oh! the shearing is all over, and the wool is coming down,", 1894 single work poetry (p. 12-13)
Click Go the Shears : An Australian Balladi"Out on the board the old shearer stands", 1954 single work poetry (p. 14-15)
Flash Jack from Gundagaii"I've shore at Burrabogie, and I've shore at Toganmain,", Anonymous , 1905 single work poetry (p. 16-17)
Down Where the Coolibahs Growi"A strapping young stockman lay dying,", Horace A. Flower , 1885 single work poetry (p. 18-19)
A Mid-Summer Noon in the Australian Foresti"Not a bird disturbs the air,", Charles Harpur , 1851 single work poetry (p. 19-20)
Note: With first line: Not a bird distubs the air.
The Sick Stockrideri"Hold hard, Ned! lift me down once more, and lay me in the shade,", Adam Lindsay Gordon , 1869 single work poetry The Sick Stock-Rider (p. 21-24)
Finis Exoptatusi"Question not, but live and labour", Adam Lindsay Gordon , 1881 extract poetry (p. 24)
Note: Extract untitled in this source.
Where the Dead Men Liei"Out on the wastes of the Never Never-", Barcroft Boake , 1891 single work poetry (p. 25-27)
The Women of the Westi"They left the vine-wreathed cottage and the mansion on the hill,", George Essex Evans , 1901 single work poetry (p. 27-28)
The Last of His Tribei"He crouches, and buries his face on his knees,", Henry Kendall , 1864 single work poetry (p. 29-30)
The Cattle Huntersi"While the morning light beams on the fern-matted streams,", Henry Kendall , 1861 single work poetry (p. 31)
Bell-Birdsi"By channels of coolness the echoes are calling,", Henry Kendall , 1867 single work poetry (p. 32-33)
A Bushman's Songi"I'm travellin' down the Castlereagh, and I'm a station hand,", A. B. Paterson , 1892 single work poetry (p. 33-35)
Waltzing Matilda : Carrying a Swagi"Oh! there once was a swagman camped in the billabong,", A. B. Paterson , 1895 single work poetry (p. 35-36)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Environmental Ethics of Australian Nature Poems Norbert H. Platz , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 81-101)
‘The basic contention inspiring this paper is: poets care about Australia’s physical environment and human survival in Australia. Australian literature contains a substantial body of knowledge that could be deployed to constitute the imaginative core of an environmental ethic. Thus a great many Australian literary texts could be studied with the purpose of helping to usher in the desirable concept of an environmentally literate community. The essay is divided into two sections. Section one will provide a brief survey of environmental ethics. This survey is followed by the exposition of six deontic or prescriptive outlines, to be supplemented by some eudaemonic considerations. The latter envisage the notion of the ‘good life,’ in harmony with nature. In section two, important insights furnished by environmental ethics will be used as an orientation towards identifying the environmental concerns shown in a variety of Australian nature poems. Among the authors considered are Bruce Dawe, Dorothy Hewett, John Kinsella, Mark O’Connor, John Shaw Neilson, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker), and last but not least Judith Wright. As will be seen, there are many convergences and correspondences between the basic claims made by environmental ethics, and the environmental insights and experiences that have been accumulated in a noteworthy corpus of Australian nature poems. What is enshrined in these poems is the ‘collective prudence,’ not only of a cultural elite, but also of the modern Everyman.’ (Author’s abstract p.81)
Forecasts Claire James , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , September vol. 71 no. 1019 1991; (p. 30)

— Review of A Treasury of Bush Verse 1991 anthology poetry ; Henry Lawson's Bush Ballads : Selected Poems and Prose Henry Lawson 1991 selected work poetry prose ; Snowy River Riders : selected poems A. B. Paterson 1991 selected work poetry
Forecasts Claire James , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , September vol. 71 no. 1019 1991; (p. 30)

— Review of A Treasury of Bush Verse 1991 anthology poetry ; Henry Lawson's Bush Ballads : Selected Poems and Prose Henry Lawson 1991 selected work poetry prose ; Snowy River Riders : selected poems A. B. Paterson 1991 selected work poetry
The Environmental Ethics of Australian Nature Poems Norbert H. Platz , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 81-101)
‘The basic contention inspiring this paper is: poets care about Australia’s physical environment and human survival in Australia. Australian literature contains a substantial body of knowledge that could be deployed to constitute the imaginative core of an environmental ethic. Thus a great many Australian literary texts could be studied with the purpose of helping to usher in the desirable concept of an environmentally literate community. The essay is divided into two sections. Section one will provide a brief survey of environmental ethics. This survey is followed by the exposition of six deontic or prescriptive outlines, to be supplemented by some eudaemonic considerations. The latter envisage the notion of the ‘good life,’ in harmony with nature. In section two, important insights furnished by environmental ethics will be used as an orientation towards identifying the environmental concerns shown in a variety of Australian nature poems. Among the authors considered are Bruce Dawe, Dorothy Hewett, John Kinsella, Mark O’Connor, John Shaw Neilson, Oodgeroo Noonuccal (Kath Walker), and last but not least Judith Wright. As will be seen, there are many convergences and correspondences between the basic claims made by environmental ethics, and the environmental insights and experiences that have been accumulated in a noteworthy corpus of Australian nature poems. What is enshrined in these poems is the ‘collective prudence,’ not only of a cultural elite, but also of the modern Everyman.’ (Author’s abstract p.81)
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