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John Freeth (1731-1808).
Botany Bay single work   poetry   "Away with all whimsical bubbles of air,"
Issue Details: First known date: 1786 1786
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: ca. 1786

Works about this Work

'Where Sydney Cove Her Lucid Bosom Swells' : The Songs of an Imagined 'Nation', 1786-1789 Nathan Garvey , 2007 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: Literature Compass , March vol. 4 no. 2007;
In the years between the mooting of the Botany Bay scheme (1786), and the news of the founding of the New South Wales penal colony reaching England (1789), a number of songs were written which envisaged the Botany Bay colony as a new 'nation'. While the survival of many of these pieces in broadside ballad form have led to their being placed within the Australian 'transportation ballad' tradition, they were not folk ballads but popular songs which generally used the themes of transportation and the penal colony to make satirical or comic comment on contemporary English politics and society. This article examines the contexts and meanings of these songs, examining their reception, audiences and publishing history, in an effort to question their placement within the Australian ballad tradition, to interrogate the views expressed on nation-building and on the structure of eighteenth-century British society, and to examine the connections between Georgian elite and popular cultures.
'Where Sydney Cove Her Lucid Bosom Swells' : The Songs of an Imagined 'Nation', 1786-1789 Nathan Garvey , 2007 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: Literature Compass , March vol. 4 no. 2007;
In the years between the mooting of the Botany Bay scheme (1786), and the news of the founding of the New South Wales penal colony reaching England (1789), a number of songs were written which envisaged the Botany Bay colony as a new 'nation'. While the survival of many of these pieces in broadside ballad form have led to their being placed within the Australian 'transportation ballad' tradition, they were not folk ballads but popular songs which generally used the themes of transportation and the penal colony to make satirical or comic comment on contemporary English politics and society. This article examines the contexts and meanings of these songs, examining their reception, audiences and publishing history, in an effort to question their placement within the Australian ballad tradition, to interrogate the views expressed on nation-building and on the structure of eighteenth-century British society, and to examine the connections between Georgian elite and popular cultures.
'Where Sydney Cove Her Lucid Bosom Swells' : The Songs of an Imagined 'Nation', 1786-1789 Nathan Garvey , 2007 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: Literature Compass , March vol. 4 no. 2007;
In the years between the mooting of the Botany Bay scheme (1786), and the news of the founding of the New South Wales penal colony reaching England (1789), a number of songs were written which envisaged the Botany Bay colony as a new 'nation'. While the survival of many of these pieces in broadside ballad form have led to their being placed within the Australian 'transportation ballad' tradition, they were not folk ballads but popular songs which generally used the themes of transportation and the penal colony to make satirical or comic comment on contemporary English politics and society. This article examines the contexts and meanings of these songs, examining their reception, audiences and publishing history, in an effort to question their placement within the Australian ballad tradition, to interrogate the views expressed on nation-building and on the structure of eighteenth-century British society, and to examine the connections between Georgian elite and popular cultures.
'Where Sydney Cove Her Lucid Bosom Swells' : The Songs of an Imagined 'Nation', 1786-1789 Nathan Garvey , 2007 single work criticism essay
— Appears in: Literature Compass , March vol. 4 no. 2007;
In the years between the mooting of the Botany Bay scheme (1786), and the news of the founding of the New South Wales penal colony reaching England (1789), a number of songs were written which envisaged the Botany Bay colony as a new 'nation'. While the survival of many of these pieces in broadside ballad form have led to their being placed within the Australian 'transportation ballad' tradition, they were not folk ballads but popular songs which generally used the themes of transportation and the penal colony to make satirical or comic comment on contemporary English politics and society. This article examines the contexts and meanings of these songs, examining their reception, audiences and publishing history, in an effort to question their placement within the Australian ballad tradition, to interrogate the views expressed on nation-building and on the structure of eighteenth-century British society, and to examine the connections between Georgian elite and popular cultures.
Last amended 9 Dec 2015 02:58:34
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  • Botany Bay, Botany area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,
  • 1780s
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