The Miracle of Mullion Hill single work   poetry   "The cock has made his winter perch"
  • Author: David Campbell http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/campbell-david
Issue Details: First known date: 1954 1954
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Works about this Work

The Sheep’s Face : Figuration, Empathy, Ethics Michael Farrell , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 1 2016;
'The word ‘species’ is etymologically related to looking. Although its primary biological definition is that of beings that can interbreed,species can refer to things of like kind: thisrelates to the term’s Latin derivation, specere, meaning to look. Describing how things look and conveying this appearance to others (whether in writing, or in relaying a memory) typically involves the use of metaphor. This article reads a number of Australian texts in terms of interspecies relations between humans and sheep, and considers the use of metaphor—and metonymy—and the place of ethics in this relation, with a particular emphasis on the face of both human and sheep: how sheep and humans look, in both senses of the word.' (Author's introduction)
The Sheep’s Face : Figuration, Empathy, Ethics Michael Farrell , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 16 no. 1 2016;
'The word ‘species’ is etymologically related to looking. Although its primary biological definition is that of beings that can interbreed,species can refer to things of like kind: thisrelates to the term’s Latin derivation, specere, meaning to look. Describing how things look and conveying this appearance to others (whether in writing, or in relaying a memory) typically involves the use of metaphor. This article reads a number of Australian texts in terms of interspecies relations between humans and sheep, and considers the use of metaphor—and metonymy—and the place of ethics in this relation, with a particular emphasis on the face of both human and sheep: how sheep and humans look, in both senses of the word.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 16 Sep 2010 14:06:37
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