Issue Details: First known date: 1905 1905
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Contents

* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,: Angus and Robertson , 1905 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Australian Bush Ballads : No. 1 : The Stockman's Songi"The sun peers o'er the wooded ridge,", Frederick Sydney Wilson , 1863 single work poetry The Australian Stockman (p. 114-115)
The Old Bullock Drayi"Oh! the shearing is all over, and the wool is coming down,", 1894 single work poetry
The Old Bark Huti"Oh, my name is Bob the swagman, and I'll have you understand", Anonymous , 1888 single work poetry
On the Road to Gundagaii"Oh, we started down from Roto when the sheds had all cut out.", Anonymous , 1905 single work poetry
Flash Jack from Gundagaii"I've shore at Burrabogie, and I've shore at Toganmain,", Anonymous , 1905 single work poetry
Another Fall of Raini"Now the weather had been sultry for a fortnight's time or more,", John Neilson , 1905 single work poetry
Bold Jack Donahoe [Donahoo]i"In Dublin Town I was brought up, in that city of great fame,", 1905 single work poetry
The Wild Colonial Boyi"'Tis of a wild Colonial boy, Jack Doolan was his name", 1905 single work poetry

'The Wild Colonial Boy' is a traditional Irish/Australian ballad of which there are many different versions. It has been argued that the original version was really about Jack Donahoe (variously spelled Donahoo or Donahue), an Irish transport who arrived at Sydney Cove in 1825, and was subsequently convicted of highway robbery and sentenced to death. He escaped and waged a guerrilla war against the wealthy for more than two years in the country around Sydney. On September 1st 1830 he was ambushed by a police party near Cambelltown and shot dead, his companions Webber and Warmsley escaping into the bush. This version was eventually outlawed as seditious so the name of the protagonist changed.

The resulting Irish version is about a young emigrant, named Jack Duggan, who left the town of Castlemaine, County Kerry, Ireland, for Australia in the 1800s. According to the song (and in keeping with the true story of Jack Donahoe), he spent his time there 'robbing from the rich to feed the poor'. In the song, the protagonist is fatally wounded in an ambush when his heart is pierced by the bullet of Fitzroy.

The Australian version has Jack Doolan (or sometimes Jack Dowling) as the protagonist, and here Castlemaine refers to the Australian town in Victoria. In both versions variation in the wording and language occurs across different sources.

In his Old Bush Songs, Banjo Patterson wrote: "it will be noticed that the same chorus is sung to both 'The Wild Colonial Boy' and 'Bold Jack Donahoo'. Several versions of both songs were sent in, but the same chorus was always made to do duty for both songs." This chorus, included in some (not all) Australian versions is as follows:


Come, all my hearties,

we'll roam the mountains high,

Together we will plunder,

together we will die.

We'll wander over valleys,

and gallop over plains,

And we'll scorn to live in

slavery, bound down with iron chains.

John Gilbert was a Bushrangeri"John Gilbert was a bushranger", 1905 single work poetry
The Squatter's Mani"Come, all ye lads an' list to me,", 1905 single work poetry
The Stringybark Cockatooi"I'm a broken-hearted miner, who loves his cup to drain,", Anonymous (fl. 1905) , 1905 single work poetry
Jimmy Sago, Jackarooi"If you want a situation, I'll just tell you the plan", 1905 single work poetry
The Sheepwasher's Lamenti"When first I took the Western track, the year was sixty-one,", 1905 single work poetry
The Broken-Down Squatteri"Come, Stumpy, old man, we must shift while we can;", 'Anthos' , 1894 single work poetry
My Mate Billi"That's his saddle across the tie-beam, an' them's his spurs up there", Ironbark , 1893 single work poetry
The Stockmen of Australiai"The Stockmen of Australia, what rowdy boys are they,", 1905 single work poetry
The Loafers' Clubi"A club there is established here, whose name they say is Legion;", 1905 single work poetry
The Stockmani"A bright sun and a loosened rein,", Anonymous , 1905 single work poetry
Maranoa Droversi"Oh, the night is dark and stormy, and the sky is clouded o'er;", A. W. Davis , 1894 single work poetry
The Squatter of the Olden Timei"I'll sing you a fine new song, made by my blessed mate,", 1905 single work poetry satire
* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,: University of Sydney Library, Scholarly Electronic Text and Image Service , 1999 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Two Aboriginal Songsi"Korindabria, korindabria, bogarona, bogarona. Iwariniang", 1905-1999 single work poetry
Settler's Lamenti"All you on emigration bent,", 1851 single work poetry The Beautiful Land of Australia
Note: With title: The Beautiful Land of Australia
* Contents derived from the Sydney, New South Wales,: ABC Books , 2005 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
Banjo Paterson and the Old Bush Songs, Warren Fahey , 1905-2005 single work criticism (p. 1-32)
The Old Bush Songs and Folklore, Graham Seal , 1905-2005 single work criticism (p. 33-43)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

Untitled Tony Smith , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: API Review of Books , July no. 44 2006;

— Review of Old Bush Songs : Composed and Sung in the Bushranging, Digging and Overlanding Days 1905 anthology poetry
Duelling Banjo Warren Fahey , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 August vol. 123 no. 6481 2005; (p. 64-66)
Matilda Richard Magoffin , 1973 single work prose
— Appears in: Fair Dinkum Matilda 1973; (p. 17 - 20)
Magoffin describes the possible origins of the meaning of 'Matilda' and defends Paterson against accusations of plagiarism.
Folklore and Australia Mark Gregory (interviewer), 1970 single work interview biography
— Appears in: Overland , [Autumn] no. 45 1970; (p. 17-26)
y Who Wrote the Ballads? : Notes on Australian Folksong J. S. Manifold , Sydney : Australasian Book Society , 1964 Z15058 1964 single work criticism A thorough assessment of the history of balladry in Australia. Its focus ranges from the 1820s to the 1950s and includes references to many famous and infamous songs.
The Ballad-Hunters J. S. Manifold , 1964 single work criticism
— Appears in: Who Wrote the Ballads? : Notes on Australian Folksong 1964; (p. 141-152)
The Sung Ballad J. S. Manifold , 1955 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 14 no. 1 1955; (p. 111-114)
Collecting Our Folk Songs Edgar Waters , 1955 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 6 1955-1956; (p. 23-25)
Singing to the Cattle Brian Elliott , 1947 single work criticism
— Appears in: Singing to the Cattle and Other Australian Essays 1947; (p. 41-62)
Elliott identifies the origins of the bush ballad in the oral folk-life of nineteenth century Australians. Examining the various immigrant ballads and shearers' ballads that were passed from singer to singer, Elliott compares them with traditional literary ballads to demonstrate how the bush ballad adapted earlier forms.
Australian Books 1924 single work column
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 4 October 1924; (p. 3)
Angus and Robertson 1924 single work column
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 18 October 1924; (p. 3)
Australian Verse 1909 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 October vol. 30 no. 1549 1909; (p. 2)
Australian Verse 1906 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 28 February vol. 72 no. 1882 1906; (p. 58)

— Review of Old Bush Songs : Composed and Sung in the Bushranging, Digging and Overlanding Days 1905 anthology poetry
Untitled Tony Smith , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: API Review of Books , July no. 44 2006;

— Review of Old Bush Songs : Composed and Sung in the Bushranging, Digging and Overlanding Days 1905 anthology poetry
Australian Verse 1906 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 28 February vol. 72 no. 1882 1906; (p. 58)

— Review of Old Bush Songs : Composed and Sung in the Bushranging, Digging and Overlanding Days 1905 anthology poetry
Duelling Banjo Warren Fahey , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 2 August vol. 123 no. 6481 2005; (p. 64-66)
Australian Books 1924 single work column
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 4 October 1924; (p. 3)
Angus and Robertson 1924 single work column
— Appears in: The Queenslander , 18 October 1924; (p. 3)
Matilda Richard Magoffin , 1973 single work prose
— Appears in: Fair Dinkum Matilda 1973; (p. 17 - 20)
Magoffin describes the possible origins of the meaning of 'Matilda' and defends Paterson against accusations of plagiarism.
Australian Verse 1909 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 October vol. 30 no. 1549 1909; (p. 2)
Singing to the Cattle Brian Elliott , 1947 single work criticism
— Appears in: Singing to the Cattle and Other Australian Essays 1947; (p. 41-62)
Elliott identifies the origins of the bush ballad in the oral folk-life of nineteenth century Australians. Examining the various immigrant ballads and shearers' ballads that were passed from singer to singer, Elliott compares them with traditional literary ballads to demonstrate how the bush ballad adapted earlier forms.
The Sung Ballad J. S. Manifold , 1955 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 14 no. 1 1955; (p. 111-114)
Collecting Our Folk Songs Edgar Waters , 1955 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Summer no. 6 1955-1956; (p. 23-25)
Folklore and Australia Mark Gregory (interviewer), 1970 single work interview biography
— Appears in: Overland , [Autumn] no. 45 1970; (p. 17-26)
y Who Wrote the Ballads? : Notes on Australian Folksong J. S. Manifold , Sydney : Australasian Book Society , 1964 Z15058 1964 single work criticism A thorough assessment of the history of balladry in Australia. Its focus ranges from the 1820s to the 1950s and includes references to many famous and infamous songs.
The Ballad-Hunters J. S. Manifold , 1964 single work criticism
— Appears in: Who Wrote the Ballads? : Notes on Australian Folksong 1964; (p. 141-152)

Awards

2006 winner Australian Bush Laureate Awards Book of the Year For the 2005 centenary edition edited by Graham Seal and Warren Fahey.
Last amended 22 Jul 2014 15:24:55
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