3061513816135733047.jpg
This image has been sourced from online
2045889469719831146.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Beyond the Labyrinth single work   novel   young adult   science fiction  
Issue Details: First known date: 1988 1988
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Life is difficult enough for Brenton. He can't get on with his parents, his younger brother is overtaking him in every way and now twelve-year-old Victoria must come and live with them too.

This turbulent, powerful novel follows Brenton as he loses himself in his beloved role playing games where the fantasy dangerously shadows real life'.

Source: author's website.

Notes

  • Also in lists selected for Horn Book Fanfare and 100 Best Children's Books NY (1991).
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • South Yarra, South Yarra - Glen Iris area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Hyland House , 1988 .
      Extent: 170p.
      ISBN: 0947062432
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Puffin , 1990 .
      3061513816135733047.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online
      Extent: 170p.
      ISBN: 0140343385
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Orchard Books , 1990 .
      Extent: 245p.
      Edition info: 1st American edition
      ISBN: 0406012806, 0531058999
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Mandarin , 1990 .
    • Balmain, Glebe - Leichhardt - Balmain area, Sydney Inner West, Sydney, New South Wales,: Ligature , 2013 .
      2045889469719831146.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 170p.p.
Alternative title: Terningernes Bud
Language: Danish
    • Aarhus,
      c
      Denmark,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Klim , 1992 .

Works about this Work

Children of the Apocalypse Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 108-134)

This chapter explores apocalypse in children's literature with reference to literary attitudes to children, nature and dystopia. Examinations of works by Lee Harding, Victor Kelleher, and John Marsden then focus on how these writers adapt apocalyptic themes for a juvenile audience. Their novels display tyranny, large-scale catastrophe, invasion, and children in danger, and their apocalyptic settings reveal anxieties about isolation, invasion, Indigenous land rights and colonization. (108)

Untitled Jenette Graham , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 15 no. 3 2001; (p. 52)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
All Our Christmases Come at Once: War, Peace and the 'Fin de Siecle' Heather Scutter , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 10 no. 3 2000; (p. 32-37)
Scutter examines a range of children's texts which are predominantly British, although a few American and Australian works are represented, including Gillian Rubinstein's Beyond the Labyrinth and Sonya Hartnett's Sleeping Dogs. Fascinated with representations of Christmas in children's fiction, Scutter argues that 'In many children's books...the mythos of Christmas forms a motif which sets a particular kind of family, child, nation and culture against the mythos of war' (32). Focusing on the fin de siecle, as characterised by 'tranformative millenialism, enervation and impotence' (32), she says 'The anxious enervation of our culture is marked not only by early rehearsal of ends of cycles, and of cultural rituals such as Christmas and Easter, but also the end of childhood to adolescent and young adulthood' (32). While there has been a shift in representations of Christmas, war and peace, Scutter concludes that the fin de siecle of children's texts continues to rely on a sense of apocolypse in what she views as as ongoing and 'anxious attempts to recuperate threatened cultural values' (36).
Metafictional Play in Children's Fiction Ann L. Grieve , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 8 no. 3 1998; (p. 5-15)

Grieve examines the role of metafiction in children's literature and its reliance on reader participation and interaction, by looking at textual strategies that construct the 'game' as text or fiction. These strategies include structuring the narrative around the rules of an actual game, constructing either the physical book or the text as a game, and/or representing characters as 'players in a game' (5). The discussion is a response to critics who question the value of child-focused metafictional texts and of narrative techniques that demystify fictional illusions (such as multiple narrative endings, unreliable narrators and characters, linguistic play, and the reworking of established literary codes and conventions through parody and intertextuality).

Grieve explores a number of texts based on the 'interrogative or metafictional play' and self-reflexivity the narratives offer, which, she argues, 'makes the reader aware of the interplay between reality and illusion' (6). As well as novels from the UK and the USA, Grieves discusses a number of Australian texts: Power and Glory (Emily Rodda and Geoff Kelly), Beyond the Labyrinth (Gillian Rubinstein), Inventing Anthony West (Gary Crew), and The Water Tower (Gary Crew and Steven Woolman).

Metafiction challenges the dominant humanist literary tradition, which posits 'stable, knowable texts' (5), by 'problematizing mimetic illusion' and questioning the 'nature and existence of reality, the creation of literary universes and the nature of human artefacts' (13). This is the value of metafictive narratives for children that Grieve elucidates and ultimately supports.

Gillian Rubinstein : 'Playing the Game of Life' John Foster , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Adolescent Novel : Australian Perspectives 1997; (p. 197-204)
Gillian Rubinstein's Beyond the Labyrinth : A Court Case and its Aftermath Jeri Kroll , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Para-doxa , vol. 2 no. 3-4 1996; (p. 332-345)
Gillian Rubinstein and Her Women Barbara Minchinton , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , August-December vol. 5 no. 2-3 1994; (p. 113-124)
Minchinton examines the stereotyped portrayals of women (particularly mothers) and girls in Rubinstein's novels and questions if perhaps her representations stem from Rubinstein's own childhood experiences of abandonment, grief and loss. In particular, Minchinton addresses Rubinstein's idealised 'earth Mother' as a counterpoint to the harshly portrayed 'working' and 'absent' mothers and asks a pertinent question: ' where does the story end and the personal pain begin?' (113). Minchinton observes a slight progression in Rubinstein's body of work towards a more rounded representation of womanhood and female sexuality, however overall, she argues that Rubinstein's characters '...may as well be heroes [as] they are not specifically female at all' (122).
A Hero is a Man...??? Gillian Rubinstein , 1993 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 8 no. 2 1993; (p. 5-9)
The Stare's Empty Nest : Some Views on Four Writers Sophie Masson , 1993 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 8 no. 4 1993; (p. 20-22)
Making Sense of Censorship Agnes Nieuwenhuizen , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , May vol. 71 no. 1026 1992; (p. 38)
Gillian Rubinstein Agnes Nieuwenhuizen (interviewer), 1991 single work biography interview
— Appears in: No Kidding : Top Writers for Young People Talk About their Work 1991; (p. 225-255)
Dancing the Labyrinth : Gillian Rubinstein's Game-Players Alice Mills , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 2 no. 1 1991; (p. 24-29)
A very long way from 'Billabong' Heather Scutter , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 2 no. 1 1991; (p. 30-35)
Shelf Life Agnes Nieuwenhuizen , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 July 1991; (p. 8 Extra)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Untitled A.A.F. , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Horn Book Magazine , Jan/February vol. 67 no. 1 1991; (p. 75-76)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Do Four-Letter Words Spell Reality to Kids? Harry Blutstein , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23 November 1991; (p. 5)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Living with Ourselves : Recent Australian Science Fiction for Children and Young People Maureen Nimon , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 185-189)
Nimon observes that Australian science fiction for children tends to present futuristic narratives that are 'earthbound' rather than 'launching into the void between the stars or touching down on remote and wonderous planets' (185). She claims that writers of juvenile science fiction 'find Australia itself to be a challenging terrain...a continent whose people are neither comfortable nor assured in their possession of it' (185). Following a discussion of novels by Lee Harding (Displaced Persons, Waiting for the End of the World), Victor Kelleher (Taronga, The Makers), and Gillian Rubinstein (Beyond the Labyrinth, Skymaze and Space Demons), Nimon claims that as well as the tendency of Australian science fiction for children to remain earthbound, there is a pervasive theme of individualization, 'where the dangers encountered and the foes met are the powers of our own desires and weaknesses; we battle to control our unruly selves' and as such, 'the future lies in our own hands' (188).
Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 34 no. 2 1990; (p. 5-6)
Untitled 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Publishers Weekly , 27 July no. 237 1990; (p. 235)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Know the Author : Gillian Rubinstein Alfred R. Mappin (interviewer), 1989 single work interview
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 4 no. 3 1989; (p. 18-20)
Untitled Jo Goodman , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , March vol. 4 no. 1 1989; (p. 31)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Untitled Jenette Graham , 2001 single work review
— Appears in: Fiction Focus : New Titles for Teenagers , vol. 15 no. 3 2001; (p. 52)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Kids' Books for Christmas Jo Goodman , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , December no. 107 1988; (p. 26-28)

— Review of Drac and the Gremlin Allan Baillie 1988 single work picture book ; Regina's Impossible Dream Judith Worthy 1988 single work children's fiction ; Bill Barbara Giles 1988 single work children's fiction ; The Best-Kept Secret Emily Rodda 1988 single work children's fiction ; Answers to Brut Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work children's fiction ; The Inheritors Jill Dobson 1988 single work novel ; Baily's Bones Victor Kelleher 1988 single work novel ; Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Warning : These Books Stretch the Mind Mark Macleod , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 25-26 March 1989; (p. 8)

— Review of The Journey John Marsden 1988 single work novel ; Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Australian Children's Book of the Year Awards 1989 short list. Jean Buckley , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: Scan , May vol. 8 no. 4 1989;

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Remarkable award hat-trick for writer Laurie Copping , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 22 July 1989;

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel ; The Lake at the End of the World Caroline Macdonald 1988 single work novel
Untitled 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Publishers Weekly , 27 July no. 237 1990; (p. 235)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Shelf Life Agnes Nieuwenhuizen , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 July 1991; (p. 8 Extra)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Untitled A.A.F. , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Horn Book Magazine , Jan/February vol. 67 no. 1 1991; (p. 75-76)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Do Four-Letter Words Spell Reality to Kids? Harry Blutstein , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 23 November 1991; (p. 5)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
The Book of the Year Award Shortlists Carmel Ballinger , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 4 no. 2 1989; (p. 16-17)

— Review of Wiggy and Boa Anna Fienberg 1988 single work children's fiction ; Megan's Star Allan Baillie 1988 single work novel ; The Lake at the End of the World Caroline Macdonald 1988 single work novel ; Deepwater Judith O'Neill 1987 single work novel ; You Take the High Road Mary K. Pershall 1988 single work novel ; Answers to Brut Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work children's fiction ; Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel ; The Split Creek Kids Roger Vaughan Carr 1988 single work children's fiction ; The Australopedia : How Australia Works After 200 Years of Other People Living Here 1988 reference non-fiction ; Callie's Family Ruth Park 1988 single work children's fiction ; The Best-Kept Secret Emily Rodda 1988 single work children's fiction ; Melanie and the Night Animal Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work children's fiction ; The Eleventh Hour : A Curious Mystery Graeme Base 1988 single work picture book ; Edward the Emu Sheena Knowles 1988 single work picture book children's fiction ; Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves Walter McVitty 1988 single work picture book ; My Place in Space Robin A Hirst Sally Hirst 1988 single work picture book ; Mr Nick's Knitting Margaret Wild 1988 single work picture book ; Drac and the Gremlin Allan Baillie 1988 single work picture book
Untitled Margot Tyrrell , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 33 no. 2 1989; (p. 29)

— Review of Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein 1988 single work novel
Know the Author : Gillian Rubinstein Alfred R. Mappin (interviewer), 1989 single work interview
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , July vol. 4 no. 3 1989; (p. 18-20)
A Hero is a Man...??? Gillian Rubinstein , 1993 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , May vol. 8 no. 2 1993; (p. 5-9)
The Stare's Empty Nest : Some Views on Four Writers Sophie Masson , 1993 single work column
— Appears in: Magpies : Talking About Books for Children , September vol. 8 no. 4 1993; (p. 20-22)
Gillian Rubinstein's Beyond the Labyrinth : A Court Case and its Aftermath Jeri Kroll , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Para-doxa , vol. 2 no. 3-4 1996; (p. 332-345)
Living with Ourselves : Recent Australian Science Fiction for Children and Young People Maureen Nimon , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 185-189)
Nimon observes that Australian science fiction for children tends to present futuristic narratives that are 'earthbound' rather than 'launching into the void between the stars or touching down on remote and wonderous planets' (185). She claims that writers of juvenile science fiction 'find Australia itself to be a challenging terrain...a continent whose people are neither comfortable nor assured in their possession of it' (185). Following a discussion of novels by Lee Harding (Displaced Persons, Waiting for the End of the World), Victor Kelleher (Taronga, The Makers), and Gillian Rubinstein (Beyond the Labyrinth, Skymaze and Space Demons), Nimon claims that as well as the tendency of Australian science fiction for children to remain earthbound, there is a pervasive theme of individualization, 'where the dangers encountered and the foes met are the powers of our own desires and weaknesses; we battle to control our unruly selves' and as such, 'the future lies in our own hands' (188).
Children of the Apocalypse Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 108-134)

This chapter explores apocalypse in children's literature with reference to literary attitudes to children, nature and dystopia. Examinations of works by Lee Harding, Victor Kelleher, and John Marsden then focus on how these writers adapt apocalyptic themes for a juvenile audience. Their novels display tyranny, large-scale catastrophe, invasion, and children in danger, and their apocalyptic settings reveal anxieties about isolation, invasion, Indigenous land rights and colonization. (108)

Gillian Rubinstein Agnes Nieuwenhuizen (interviewer), 1991 single work biography interview
— Appears in: No Kidding : Top Writers for Young People Talk About their Work 1991; (p. 225-255)
Making Sense of Censorship Agnes Nieuwenhuizen , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Bookseller & Publisher , May vol. 71 no. 1026 1992; (p. 38)
Gillian Rubinstein : 'Playing the Game of Life' John Foster , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Adolescent Novel : Australian Perspectives 1997; (p. 197-204)
Dancing the Labyrinth : Gillian Rubinstein's Game-Players Alice Mills , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 2 no. 1 1991; (p. 24-29)
A very long way from 'Billabong' Heather Scutter , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 2 no. 1 1991; (p. 30-35)
Speculative Fiction for Australian Children Ann L. Grieve , 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March no. 108 1989; (p. 22-25)
Gillian Rubinstein and Her Women Barbara Minchinton , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , August-December vol. 5 no. 2-3 1994; (p. 113-124)
Minchinton examines the stereotyped portrayals of women (particularly mothers) and girls in Rubinstein's novels and questions if perhaps her representations stem from Rubinstein's own childhood experiences of abandonment, grief and loss. In particular, Minchinton addresses Rubinstein's idealised 'earth Mother' as a counterpoint to the harshly portrayed 'working' and 'absent' mothers and asks a pertinent question: ' where does the story end and the personal pain begin?' (113). Minchinton observes a slight progression in Rubinstein's body of work towards a more rounded representation of womanhood and female sexuality, however overall, she argues that Rubinstein's characters '...may as well be heroes [as] they are not specifically female at all' (122).
Metafictional Play in Children's Fiction Ann L. Grieve , 1998 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 8 no. 3 1998; (p. 5-15)

Grieve examines the role of metafiction in children's literature and its reliance on reader participation and interaction, by looking at textual strategies that construct the 'game' as text or fiction. These strategies include structuring the narrative around the rules of an actual game, constructing either the physical book or the text as a game, and/or representing characters as 'players in a game' (5). The discussion is a response to critics who question the value of child-focused metafictional texts and of narrative techniques that demystify fictional illusions (such as multiple narrative endings, unreliable narrators and characters, linguistic play, and the reworking of established literary codes and conventions through parody and intertextuality).

Grieve explores a number of texts based on the 'interrogative or metafictional play' and self-reflexivity the narratives offer, which, she argues, 'makes the reader aware of the interplay between reality and illusion' (6). As well as novels from the UK and the USA, Grieves discusses a number of Australian texts: Power and Glory (Emily Rodda and Geoff Kelly), Beyond the Labyrinth (Gillian Rubinstein), Inventing Anthony West (Gary Crew), and The Water Tower (Gary Crew and Steven Woolman).

Metafiction challenges the dominant humanist literary tradition, which posits 'stable, knowable texts' (5), by 'problematizing mimetic illusion' and questioning the 'nature and existence of reality, the creation of literary universes and the nature of human artefacts' (13). This is the value of metafictive narratives for children that Grieve elucidates and ultimately supports.

All Our Christmases Come at Once: War, Peace and the 'Fin de Siecle' Heather Scutter , 2000 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , December vol. 10 no. 3 2000; (p. 32-37)
Scutter examines a range of children's texts which are predominantly British, although a few American and Australian works are represented, including Gillian Rubinstein's Beyond the Labyrinth and Sonya Hartnett's Sleeping Dogs. Fascinated with representations of Christmas in children's fiction, Scutter argues that 'In many children's books...the mythos of Christmas forms a motif which sets a particular kind of family, child, nation and culture against the mythos of war' (32). Focusing on the fin de siecle, as characterised by 'tranformative millenialism, enervation and impotence' (32), she says 'The anxious enervation of our culture is marked not only by early rehearsal of ends of cycles, and of cultural rituals such as Christmas and Easter, but also the end of childhood to adolescent and young adulthood' (32). While there has been a shift in representations of Christmas, war and peace, Scutter concludes that the fin de siecle of children's texts continues to rely on a sense of apocolypse in what she views as as ongoing and 'anxious attempts to recuperate threatened cultural values' (36).
Beyond the Labyrinth Gillian Rubinstein , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 34 no. 2 1990; (p. 5-6)
The Children's Book Council of Australia Awards 1989 1989 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Time : The Journal of the Children's Book Council of Australia , vol. 33 no. 3 1989; (p. 3-8)
The judges' report for the 1989 Australian Children's Book Council Book of the Year Awards.
Last amended 18 Aug 2016 14:55:49
Settings:
  • South Australia,
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X