Migrant Hostel : Parkes, 1949-51 single work   poetry   "No one kept count"
Issue Details: First known date: 1975 1975
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

Notes

  • Set to music by Stephen Adams.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Immigrant Chronicle Peter Skrzynecki , St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1975 Z568116 1975 selected work poetry St Lucia : University of Queensland Press , 1975 pg. 44-45
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Verse from 1805 : A Continuum Geoffrey Dutton (editor), Adelaide : Rigby , 1976 Z399014 1976 anthology Adelaide : Rigby , 1976 pg. 274
  • Appears in:
    y Displacements : Migrant Story-Tellers Sneja Gunew (editor), Waurn Ponds : Deakin University. School of Humanities. Open Campus Program , 1982 Z22969 1982 anthology poetry short story extract autobiography Waurn Ponds : Deakin University. School of Humanities. Open Campus Program , 1982 pg. 138
  • Appears in:
    y The Polish Immigrant : Migrant Poems (1972-82) Peter Skrzynecki , Indooroopilly : Phoenix Publications , 1982 Z535611 1982 selected work poetry Indooroopilly : Phoenix Publications , 1982 pg. 11
  • Appears in:
    y Displacements 2 : Multicultural Storytellers Sneja Gunew (editor), Geelong : Deakin University Press , 1987 Z373219 1987 anthology poetry short story extract prose criticism biography autobiography Geelong : Deakin University Press , 1987 pg. 117
  • Appears in:
    y I'm Ukrainian Mate! : New Australian Generation of Poets Sonia Mycak (editor), Kiev : Alternativy , 2000 Z1255195 2000 anthology poetry Kiev : Alternativy , 2000 pg. 114-115
  • Appears in:
    y The Penguin Anthology of Australian Poetry John Kinsella (editor), Camberwell : Penguin , 2009 Z1553543 2009 anthology poetry (taught in 16 units)

    'This is a comprehensive survey of Australian poetic achievement, ranging from early colonial and indigenous verse to contemporary work, from the major poets to those who deserve to be better recognised.' (Provided by the publisher).

    Camberwell : Penguin , 2009
    pg. 286-287
  • Appears in:
    y Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature Nicholas Jose (editor), Kerryn Goldsworthy (editor), Anita Heiss (editor), David McCooey (editor), Peter Minter (editor), Nicole Moore (editor), Elizabeth Webby (editor), Crows Nest : Allen and Unwin , 2009 Z1590615 2009 anthology correspondence diary drama essay extract poetry prose short story (taught in 23 units)

    'Some of the best, most significant writing produced in Australia over more than two centuries is gathered in this landmark anthology. Covering all genres - from fiction, poetry and drama to diaries, letters, essays and speeches - the anthology maps the development of one of the great literatures in English in all its energy and variety.

    'The writing reflects the diverse experiences of Australians in their encounter with their extraordinary environment and with themselves. This is literature of struggle, conflict and creative survival. It is literature of lives lived at the extremes, of frontiers between cultures, of new dimensions of experience, where imagination expands.

    'This rich, informative and entertaining collection charts the formation of an Australian voice that draws inventively on Indigenous words, migrant speech and slang, with a cheeky, subversive humour always to the fore. For the first time, Aboriginal writings are interleaved with other English-language writings throughout - from Bennelong's 1796 letter to the contemporary flowering of Indigenous fiction and poetry - setting up an exchange that reveals Australian history in stark new ways.

    'From vivid settler accounts to haunting gothic tales, from raw protest to feisty urban satire and playful literary experiment, from passionate love poetry to moving memoir, the Macquarie PEN Anthology of Australian Literature reflects the creative eloquence of a society.

    'Chosen by a team of expert editors, who have provided illuminating essays about their selections, and with more than 500 works from over 300 authors, it is an authoritative survey and a rich world of reading to be enjoyed.' (Publisher's blurb)

    Allen and Unwin have a YouTube channel with a number of useful videos on the Anthology.

    Crows Nest : Allen and Unwin , 2009
    pg. 1105-1106

Works about this Work

Poetry and Politics : In Conflict or Conversation? Aboriginal Poetry, Peter Skrzynecki, and Bruce Dawe Bernadette Brennan , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Studies in English , vol. 28 no. 2002; (p. 103-123)
'At first blush it may appear that poetry, a seemingly private language of lyric or personal experience, would have at best a very tenuous relationship with the public reality of the political. Indeed those who argue that art should be produced for art's sake, free from the tyranny of meaning and purpose, would insist that poetry and the political must operate in separate spheres. But what exactly does the term 'political' mean? 'Political' refers to the way a society organises its social life and the power relations which that organisation involves. Poetry which deals with the nature of relationships, language, history, existence, oppression, and death is, therefore, political. The relationship between poetry and the political is, however, more subtle and more profound than this neat equation suggests. In this paper readings of poems by a number of Aboriginal poets, by Peter Skrzynecki, and by Bruce Dawe, seek to uncover ways in which individual poems can offer a deeper understanding of some of the moral and political questions facing contemporary Australian society: black / white relations, asylum seekers, unemployment, and globalisation.' (Author's abstract)
Poetry and Politics : In Conflict or Conversation? Aboriginal Poetry, Peter Skrzynecki, and Bruce Dawe Bernadette Brennan , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sydney Studies in English , vol. 28 no. 2002; (p. 103-123)
'At first blush it may appear that poetry, a seemingly private language of lyric or personal experience, would have at best a very tenuous relationship with the public reality of the political. Indeed those who argue that art should be produced for art's sake, free from the tyranny of meaning and purpose, would insist that poetry and the political must operate in separate spheres. But what exactly does the term 'political' mean? 'Political' refers to the way a society organises its social life and the power relations which that organisation involves. Poetry which deals with the nature of relationships, language, history, existence, oppression, and death is, therefore, political. The relationship between poetry and the political is, however, more subtle and more profound than this neat equation suggests. In this paper readings of poems by a number of Aboriginal poets, by Peter Skrzynecki, and by Bruce Dawe, seek to uncover ways in which individual poems can offer a deeper understanding of some of the moral and political questions facing contemporary Australian society: black / white relations, asylum seekers, unemployment, and globalisation.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 22 Sep 2013 12:19:53
Subjects:
  • Country towns,
  • Parkes, Parkes area, Parkes - Forbes area, Central West NSW, New South Wales,
Settings:
  • Parkes, Parkes area, Parkes - Forbes area, Central West NSW, New South Wales,
  • 1940s
  • 1950s
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X