Issue Details: First known date: 1995 1995
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Includes chapters on subjects ranging from the representation of property and ethics in 19th century novels, captivity narratives, romantic narratives, the occult, crime fiction and empire, and the representation of the 'Asiatic' in The Lone Hand.

Includes discussion of the influence of British writers H. Rider Haggard, Sir Walter Scott, Rudyard Kipling and Robert Louis Stevenson.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Oakleigh, Murrumbeena - Oakleigh - Springvale area, Melbourne South East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Cambridge University Press , 1995 .
      Extent: x, 228 p.p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Includes bibliographical references and index.
      ISBN: 0521481902 (hbk)

Works about this Work

Cooper, Cather, Prichard, 'Pioneer' : The Chronotope of Settler Colonialism Tony Hughes-d'Aeth , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 1 June vol. 31 no. 3 2016;
'This essay considers three novels which each bear the word ‘pioneer’ in their titles: James Fenimore Cooper’s The Pioneers (1823), Willa Cather’s O Pioneers! (1913) and Katharine Susannah Prichard’s The Pioneers (1915). The three novels, although moving widely across time and space, are taken as representative of the creative literature of settler colonialism. A model of reading settler colonial literature is advanced that draws on four distinct features found across the three novels. These are: a tendency to spatialise the historical time of settler colonialism within the geography of the novel; the condensation of settler legal anxiety into a legal drama in the text; the application of a generational structure to Indigenise the settler; and the recurrence in the text of a ‘primal scene’ by which the settler society remembers its foundational violence in repressed form.' (Publication summary)
Towards a Genealogy of Minor Colonial Australian Character Types Ken Gelder , Rachael Weaver , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies , January vol. 17 no. 2 2015; (p. 211-228)
Crikey it’s Bromance : A History of Australian Pulp Westerns Toni Johnson-Woods , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 141-161)
‘The Australian version of the Western novel is the subject matter of Toni Johnson-Woods’ chapter. Western as a genre was present in Australia since colonial times – a ‘romance of property’ (Dixon 22). She takes up Len Meares, the man behind Marshall Grover as her case study. Perhaps the most intriguing part of her chapter is the study of book covers, as she argues that ‘books are more than printed codex; they are cultural products with covers, advertising, pricing and distribution.’ For Johnson-Woods, “the covers are semiotically charged marketing tools; the artwork, design and titles emit generic and cultural messages.” Australian Western authors, some of the most prolific authors, have been writing not only for an Australian readership but also for an international one. In conclusion Johnson-Woods laments that “I doubt if you’ll shake their hands or sign their books at writers’ festivals. It is not that they are not likeable people. They are tainted with a fatal literary disease, they’re carriers of the popular fiction virus. And even more condemning, they do not even write ‘respectable’ popular fiction like detective fiction – they write politically incorrect masculinist westerns. Regardless of how literary critics assess their contribution to Australian fiction, they provide hours of entertainment for their many readers.”’ (Editor’s foreword xiii)
Foreword : Sold by the Millions Amit Sarwal , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. viii-xvi)
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
An Apocalyptic Map : New Worlds and the Colonization of Australia Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 23-53)
'This chapter examines the map that preceded, and eventually superseded, the territory of Australia, in order to demonstrate that early maps of the south land established an apocalyptic tradition that still resonates in contemporary fictions. If one reinterprets Jean Baudrillard's comments in the context of colonization and Australia, it is possible to see how European imagination delineated an apocalyptic map of the country before explorers and settlers even arrived, a map that located Australia as a tabula rasa, a blank slate where heaven and hell might equally be feasible. This chapter surveys the dialectic emerging from these confliction visions.' (24)
Lemuria and Australian Dreams of an Inland Sea Michael Cathcart , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lemuria , Winter vol. 1 no. 1 2006; (p. 32-47)
Cathcart reads a range of 'Lemurian novels,' examining their 'uncomplicated optimism about the future of White Australia, their trust that the key to that future lay beneath the earth, in the Great Australian Basin, and their attempts to grapple with the deadly impact of colonisation on the Aborigines who resisted' (44).
Warm Comfort Zone Ludmilla Forsyth , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 144 1996; (p. 83-86)

— Review of Prophet from the Desert : Critical Essays on Patrick White 1995 anthology criticism biography ; Australian Melodramas : Thomas Keneally's Fiction Peter Pierce 1995 single work criticism ; Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism ; Judith Wright Jennifer Strauss 1995 single work criticism
Literary Criticism V.S. , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 15 March no. 4850 1996; (p. 33)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Rewriting the Colonial Adventure? Chris Tiffin , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: LiNQ , May vol. 23 no. 1 1996; (p. 97-100)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Untitled David Carter , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 17 no. 4 1996; (p. 407-411)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism ; Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan 1995 selected work criticism
Colony to Nation Robert Dixon , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Margin , July-August no. 36 1995; (p. 32)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Studies in the National Culture Simon Ryan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Coppertales : A Journal of Rural Arts , no. 2 1995; (p. 116-119)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
The Anglo-Australian Ripping Yarn Michael Sharkey , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 173 1995; (p. 27-28)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Warm Comfort Zone Ludmilla Forsyth , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 144 1996; (p. 83-86)

— Review of Prophet from the Desert : Critical Essays on Patrick White 1995 anthology criticism biography ; Australian Melodramas : Thomas Keneally's Fiction Peter Pierce 1995 single work criticism ; Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism ; Judith Wright Jennifer Strauss 1995 single work criticism
Colony to Nation Robert Dixon , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Margin , July-August no. 36 1995; (p. 32)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Studies in the National Culture Simon Ryan , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Coppertales : A Journal of Rural Arts , no. 2 1995; (p. 116-119)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
The Anglo-Australian Ripping Yarn Michael Sharkey , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , August no. 173 1995; (p. 27-28)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Literary Criticism V.S. , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 15 March no. 4850 1996; (p. 33)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Rewriting the Colonial Adventure? Chris Tiffin , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: LiNQ , May vol. 23 no. 1 1996; (p. 97-100)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism
Untitled David Carter , 1996 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 17 no. 4 1996; (p. 407-411)

— Review of Writing the Colonial Adventure : Race, Gender and Nation in Anglo-Australian Popular Fiction, 1875-1914 Robert Dixon 1995 single work criticism ; Along the Faultlines : Sex, Race and Nation in Australian Women's Writing - 1880s-1930s Susan Sheridan 1995 selected work criticism
Lemuria and Australian Dreams of an Inland Sea Michael Cathcart , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lemuria , Winter vol. 1 no. 1 2006; (p. 32-47)
Cathcart reads a range of 'Lemurian novels,' examining their 'uncomplicated optimism about the future of White Australia, their trust that the key to that future lay beneath the earth, in the Great Australian Basin, and their attempts to grapple with the deadly impact of colonisation on the Aborigines who resisted' (44).
Negotiating the Colonial Australian Popular Fiction Archive Ken Gelder , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue vol. 11 no. 1 2011; (p. 1-12)
'There is an identifiable 'archive' of colonial Australian popular fiction consisting of romance, adventure fiction, Gothic fiction, crime fiction, Lemurian fantasy and a significant number of related subgenres (bushranger fiction, convict romance, Pacific or 'South Sea' adventure, tropical romance, 'lost explorer' stories, and so on). Looking at this archive soon reveals both its sheer size and range, and the fact that so little of it is remembered today. Rachael Weaver, Ailie Smith and I have begun to build a digital archive of colonial Australian popular fiction with the primary aim of making this material available to an interested reading public, as well as to scholars specialising in colonial Australian (and transnational) literary studies. At the time of writing we are really only about 20% complete with around 500 authors represented on the site, although many with only a fraction of their work uploaded and with only the bare bones of a scholarly apparatus around them: a few short biographical notes, a bibliography, and the texts themselves: first editions in most cases.' (Author's introduction, p. 1)
Crikey it’s Bromance : A History of Australian Pulp Westerns Toni Johnson-Woods , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 141-161)
‘The Australian version of the Western novel is the subject matter of Toni Johnson-Woods’ chapter. Western as a genre was present in Australia since colonial times – a ‘romance of property’ (Dixon 22). She takes up Len Meares, the man behind Marshall Grover as her case study. Perhaps the most intriguing part of her chapter is the study of book covers, as she argues that ‘books are more than printed codex; they are cultural products with covers, advertising, pricing and distribution.’ For Johnson-Woods, “the covers are semiotically charged marketing tools; the artwork, design and titles emit generic and cultural messages.” Australian Western authors, some of the most prolific authors, have been writing not only for an Australian readership but also for an international one. In conclusion Johnson-Woods laments that “I doubt if you’ll shake their hands or sign their books at writers’ festivals. It is not that they are not likeable people. They are tainted with a fatal literary disease, they’re carriers of the popular fiction virus. And even more condemning, they do not even write ‘respectable’ popular fiction like detective fiction – they write politically incorrect masculinist westerns. Regardless of how literary critics assess their contribution to Australian fiction, they provide hours of entertainment for their many readers.”’ (Editor’s foreword xiii)
Foreword : Sold by the Millions Amit Sarwal , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. viii-xvi)
An Apocalyptic Map : New Worlds and the Colonization of Australia Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 23-53)
'This chapter examines the map that preceded, and eventually superseded, the territory of Australia, in order to demonstrate that early maps of the south land established an apocalyptic tradition that still resonates in contemporary fictions. If one reinterprets Jean Baudrillard's comments in the context of colonization and Australia, it is possible to see how European imagination delineated an apocalyptic map of the country before explorers and settlers even arrived, a map that located Australia as a tabula rasa, a blank slate where heaven and hell might equally be feasible. This chapter surveys the dialectic emerging from these confliction visions.' (24)
Towards a Genealogy of Minor Colonial Australian Character Types Ken Gelder , Rachael Weaver , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies , January vol. 17 no. 2 2015; (p. 211-228)
Cooper, Cather, Prichard, 'Pioneer' : The Chronotope of Settler Colonialism Tony Hughes-d'Aeth , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , 1 June vol. 31 no. 3 2016;
'This essay considers three novels which each bear the word ‘pioneer’ in their titles: James Fenimore Cooper’s The Pioneers (1823), Willa Cather’s O Pioneers! (1913) and Katharine Susannah Prichard’s The Pioneers (1915). The three novels, although moving widely across time and space, are taken as representative of the creative literature of settler colonialism. A model of reading settler colonial literature is advanced that draws on four distinct features found across the three novels. These are: a tendency to spatialise the historical time of settler colonialism within the geography of the novel; the condensation of settler legal anxiety into a legal drama in the text; the application of a generational structure to Indigenise the settler; and the recurrence in the text of a ‘primal scene’ by which the settler society remembers its foundational violence in repressed form.' (Publication summary)
Last amended 9 Dec 2010 09:33:37
Subjects:
  • c
    Australia,
    c
  • Pacific Region,
  • Asia,
  • 1870s
  • 1880s
  • 1890s
  • 1900s
  • 1910s
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