y Kangaroo single work   novel  
First known date: 1923 Issue Details: First known date: 1923 1923
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Kangaroo, set in Australia, is D. H. Lawrence's eighth novel. He wrote the first draft in just forty-five days while living south of Sydney, in 1922, and revised it three months later in New Mexico. The descriptions of the country are among the most vivid and sympathetic ever penned, and the book fuses lightly disguised autobiography with an exploration of political ideas at an immensely personal level. His anxiety about the future of democracy, caught as it was in the turbulent cross currents of fascism and socialism, is only partly appeased by his vision of a new bond of comradeship between men based on their unique separateness. Lawrence's alter ego Richard Somers departs for America to continue his search.

Adaptations

form y Kangaroo Evan Jones , Australia : Western Pacific Films Naked Country Productions , 1987 7871581 1987 single work film/TV

'Adapted from D.H. Lawrence's story of love, violence and political intrigue, based on his personal experiences in Australia in 1922. 'Kangaroo' - the code name of the charismatic leader of a secret fascist army - brings all his dark power to bear to seduce the writer into embracing his ideas, but the writer and his wife find strength in their love reawakened in the exotic southern land.'

Source: Screen Australia.

y Kangaroo David Britton , United Kingdom (UK) : British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) , 2000 8145728 2000 single work radio play

'Set in Australia in 1922, Kangaroo tells the story of English writer Lovat and his wife, who arrive in Sydney in search of a new life.'

Source:

Radio Times, 2 March 2000, p.124.

Notes

  • Brief extract published in the Age, 6 February 1995, Student Upate, p.4.
  • First published in September 1923 in both New York and London.
  • For details of textual variations and variant endings see notes in the Cambridge edition 1994.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Thomas Seltzer , 1923 .
      Extent: 421p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes the author's later corrections; ending differs from English ed. 1923.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins , 1989 .
      Extent: xii, 418p.p.
      Edition info: Corrected ed.
      Note/s:
      • Text follows the corrected edition published by Seltzer 1923.
      • Foreword by Raymond Southall.
      ISBN: 0732225736 (pbk.)
    • Potts Point, Kings Cross area, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: ETT Imprint , 1995 .
      Extent: xii, 418p.p.
      Edition info: Corrected ed.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Text follows the corrected edition published by Seltzer 1923.
      • Foreword by Raymond Southall.
      ISBN: 1875892141 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Martin Secker , 1923 .
      Extent: 402p.
      Note/s:
      • Does not include the author's later corrections; They were included in the Seltzer edition. Ending differs from American edition.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books ; Heinemann , 1950 .
      Extent: 394p.
      Reprinted: 1954 , 1960 , 1963 , 1968 , 1971 , 1976 , 1975 , 1977
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Richard Aldington.
      Series: Penguin Books Penguin Books (publisher), series - publisher Number in series: 751
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Heinemann , 1955 .
      Extent: x, 367 p.p.
      Reprinted: 1960
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Richard Aldington.
      • Phoenix edition of D.H. Lawrence
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Heinemann , 1963 .
      Extent: 401p.
      Note/s:
      • Critical notes by James Gribble.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Heron Books , 1969 .
      Extent: x, 366 p.p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Richard Aldington; original illustrations by by Michael Jackson.

Works about this Work

y DH Lawrence's 99 Days in Australia : Volume One : The Quest for Cooley 'The Quest for Colley' Robert Darroch , Strawberry Hills : Svengall Press , 2016 10246607 2016 single work criticism

'The Quest for Cooley is the story of the 40-year search for the identity of the real life figure that DH Lawrence portrayed as the Australian political leader Benjamin Cooley in his 1923 Australian novel, Kangaroo. Through his intensive research in Australia and overseas, Robert Darroch, a former investigative journalist on The Bulletin, discovered that Lawrence ran across an actual secret army in Sydney in 1922, and unmasked it in his novel of Australia. This is a story that many people and interests have tried to prevent coming out. It exposes the fascist underbelly - what Lawrence called "the horrible paws" - of post-WW1 Australian society and politics.' (Publication summary)

y DH Lawrence's 99 Days in Australia : Volume Two : The Silvery Freedom ... & the Horrible Paws Robert Darroch , Strawberry Hills : Svengall Press , 2016 10246648 2016 single work criticism

'The Silvery Freedom ... and the Horrible Paws is the story of how DH Lawrence's 8th major novel, Kangaroo, was composed and written. The title refers to Lawrence's realisation - half-way through writing the book - that he had stumbled on a secret para-military organisation in Australia in 1922. "It was as if," he wrote in Kangaroo, "the silvery freedom suddenly turned, and showed the scaly back of a reptile, and the horrible paws."

'This is a story that many people and interests tried to prevent coming out. It reveals the fascist underbelly of post-WW1 Australian society and politics.

'It is the second volume of the author's Lawrence's 99 Days in Australia, which together tell the story of how the 20th-century's most controversial author came to write his most surprising work of "fiction".' (Publication summary)

D.H. Lawrence, Brian Penton and Australian Journalism Robert Darroch , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Quadrant , January / February vol. 59 no. 1/2 2015; (p. 88-90)
'Of all the great names in English literature who have visited our shores, the one that left the biggest footprint was D.H. Lawrence. In 1922, in a bungalow in Thirroul, he wrote his eighth major novel, Kangaroo, which John Douglas Pringle called "the most profound book ever written about our country" (alongside only Hancock's Australia).' (Publication abstract)
y D. H. Lawrence's Australia : Anxiety at the Edge of Empire David Game , Burlington : Ashgate , 2015 8271652 2015 single work criticism

'The first full-length account of D. H. Lawrence’s rich engagement with a country he found both fascinating and frustrating, D. H. Lawrence’s Australia focuses on the philosophical, anthropological and literary influences that informed the utopian and regenerative visions that characterise so much of Lawrence’s work. David Game gives particular attention to the four novels and one novella published between 1920 and 1925, what Game calls Lawrence’s “Australian period,” shedding new light on Lawrence’s attitudes towards Australia in general and, more specifically, towards Australian Aborigines, women and colonialism. He revisits key aspects of Lawrence’s development as a novelist and thinker, including the influence of Darwin and Lawrence’s rejection of eugenics, Christianity, psychoanalysis and science. While Game concentrates on the Australian novels such as Kangaroo and The Boy in the Bush, he also uncovers the Australian elements in a range of other works, including Lawrence’s last novel, Lady Chatterley’s Lover. Lawrence lived in Australia for just three months, but as Game shows, it played a significant role in his quest for a way of life that would enable regeneration of the individual in the face of what Lawrence saw as the moral collapse of modern industrial civilisation after the outbreak of World War I.' (Publication summary)

The World a New Leaf Daniel O'Neil , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Quadrant , May vol. 59 no. 5 2015; (p. 82-84)
Lawrence and Australian Fascism Robert Darroch , 2015 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Quadrant , September vol. 59 no. 9 2015; (p. 3-4)
The Athens of the South Alison Broinowski , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Adelaide : A Literary City 2014; (p. 147-161)
The Outsiders Nicolas Rothwell , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 9-10 March 2013; (p. 18-19)
y The Scaly Back of a Reptile and the Horrible Paws : The Search for the Truth About D.H. Lawrence's Kangaroo Robert Darroch , Australia : Robert Darroch , 2013 6856333 2013 single work criticism

The Scaly Back of a Reptile and the Horrible Paws is the result of Darroch’s research into D.H. Lawrence’s weeks in New South Wales in 1922.

Time's Abyss : Australian Literary Modernism and the Scene of the Ferry Wreck Brigid Rooney , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Scenes of Reading : Is Australian Literature a World Literature? 2013; (p. 101-114)

'The desire to challenge or escape colonial provincialism in search of a freer, more cosmopolitan modernity finds expression in three works of fiction by women writers that stage the drama of ferry wreck on Sydney Harbour, and that thread - as Wai Chee Dimock would say - local Australian scenes into the deeper time of world literature: Christina Stead's short story 'Day of Wrath' (1934), Eleanor Dark's novel Waterway (1938) and The Transit of Venus (1980) by Shirley Hazzard' [p. 102].

Caught : Sentimental, Decorative Kangaroo Identities in Popular Culture Peta Tait , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Captured : The Animal within Culture 2013; (p. 175-194)
Affective and Transnational : The Bounding Kangaroo Michael Farrell , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 13 no. 3 2013;
'The following article is concerned with poetic uses of the word ‘kangaroo’ locally and transnationally, with particular notice given to affective aspects of this use, as well as the associated figuring of racial and/or national divisions. Attention to such relational aspects inevitably means attention to kangaroos not just as a linguistic term, but, also, as represented beings. In what follows we will meet happy kangaroos, sad kangaroos, terrified kangaroos and awesome kangaroos. Given that Michael Ackland refers to the kangaroo as ‘a metonym for the [Australian] landscape’ (25), I consider what these representations have to say about how land is represented in the Australian poems of Barron Field and Charles Harpur, as well as in a poem by D. H. Lawrence. What do kangaroos do, what are they doing in American poems? In texts Emily Dickinson and Frank O’Hara, they have been appropriated respectively for purposes of metaphor and metonym.' (Publication abstract)
'Our Kind of Country' : Writing Australia from New Mexico Nicholas Jose , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Magnificent Obsessions : Honouring the Lives of Hazel Rowley 2013; (p. 104-121)
Literary Heroes Forgotten Michael Heywood , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 22 January 2012; (p. 9)
Inside out in Australia Peter Ellingsen , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 71 no. 1 2012; (p. 56-62)
'The notion of an inner life - just like the idea of an inland - has long been equated with emptiness in Australia. Terms such as 'dead heart' to denote the red centre and 'outback' to describe regions outside coastal cities suggest that, in Australia, the inner is on the outer. Even in the metropolis there is, as D.H. Lawrence noted when he visited Sydney, a terrifying vacancy. Australians, he wrote in his novel Kangaroo, were 'awfully nice but they have got nothing inside them'. For Patrick White, this was the Great Australian Emptiness, an environment in which 'the mind is the least of possessions, in which the rich man is the important man, in which the schoolmaster and the journalist rule what intellectual roost there is ...' (Author's abstract)
'Did He Want to Mix and Mate with this Man?' : Mateship, Modernism and Homoerotic Primitivism Damien Barlow , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 27 no. 1 2012; (p. 18-32)
Writing the Australian Bush : DH Lawrence’s Wildflowers Christopher Pollnitz , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Conversation , 2 June 2012;
Long Journey to Canvas Via the Movie Joyce Morgan , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 2 November 2011; (p. 14)
Gary Shead's early films are unique social documents writes Joyce Morgan.
'Falling Out of a Picture': The Australian Landscape in D. H. Lawrence's Kangaroo Cheryl Hindrichs , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: D. H. Lawrence Review , vol. 36 no. 2 2011; (p. 43-71)
Reading 'Walkabout' in the 1930s Mitchell Rolls , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'The Australian magazine Walkabout, loosely modelled on National Geographic, was published between 1934 and 1974, with a concluding single edition being issued in January 1978. Unlike National Geographic, the very middlebrow Walkabout has attracted little critical scrutiny. The few responses to Walkabout have predominantly criticised its role in fomenting a specific version of the settlement myth, in particular that of promoting white progress and modernisation of the outback against a projected Aboriginal absence. Leaving aside its representation of Aborigines (this matter is dealt with in a forthcoming essay) this paper argues that at least in the first decade of Walkabout's long run, its warmth for and promotion of Australia, particularly the interior and remote regions, is distinctive when contrasted with the nationalist fervour of other contemporary movements, and that ideologically-bound criticism overlooks the more nuanced forms of settler belonging the magazine facilitated.' (Author's abstract)
Two Sides to the Story : Against Mindy Laube , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6-7 January 2007; (p. 32)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : For Matthew Thompson , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6-7 January 2007; (p. 32)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Made in Heaven Frank Kermode , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 10 November vol. 16 no. 21 1994; (p. 24-25)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Lawrence's Works Gain from Local Connection Christopher Pollnitz , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 1 March 1995; (p. 28)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Untitled Frances Devlin-Glass , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , March no. 44 1995; (p. 103-104)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
At Long Last! : the Cup Edition of Kangaroo Paul Eggert , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Rananim : The Journal of the D.H. Lawrence Society of Australia , February vol. 3 no. 1 1995; (p. 12-13)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Conjecture as an Art Form Laurie Clancy , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 31 March-1 April 1990; (p. 5)

— Review of D.H. Lawrence at Thirroul Joseph Davis 1989 single work biography ; Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
D.H. Lawrence's Australian Visit Revisited... Robert L. Ross , 1991 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 5 no. 2 1991; (p. 163)

— Review of D.H. Lawrence at Thirroul Joseph Davis 1989 single work biography ; Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
As D.H. Lawrence Sees Us C. McL. , 1923 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 13 December vol. 44 no. 2287 1923; (p. 2)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Untitled 1923 single work review
— Appears in: The Forum , 19 December 1923; (p. 19)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
'Kangaroo' : A Picture of Australia by a Great English Novelist William Siebenhaar , 1924 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times [Perth] , 27 January 1924; (p. 13)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Notable Books Jade , 1924 single work review
— Appears in: Stead's Review , 12 January 1924;

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
A Genius at "Coo-ee" 1960 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 15 November 1960; (p. 46)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Lawrence's "Wild Novel of Australia" Roland Robinson , 1960 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 7 December vol. 81 no. 4217 1960; (p. 2,57)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Jumping to Conclusions About the Right-Wing Army of Kangaroo A. P. Riemer , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 9 December 1989; (p. 72)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Putting `Kangaroo' in Its Place Peter Pierce , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 24 February 1990; (p. 86)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Editor's Choice Jason Steger , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 9 July 1995; (p. 10)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Second Look Peter Craven , 2000 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 25 June 2000; (p. 10)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
The Dutch-Australian Connection : Willem Siebenhaar, D. H. Lawrence, Max Havelaar and Kangaroo Paul Eggert , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 3-19)
This thoroughly researched article traces the life and work of Dutch-born left-wing activist, theosophist, scholar and poet Willem Siebenhaar who moved to Western Australia in 1891, and his connection with D. H. Lawrence, whom he met in 1922 and who helped him secure publication for a translation of Multatuli's Max Havelaar. Drawing on archival material such as Siebenhaar's correspondence, and on the letters of Lawrence, the article provides evidence not only of Siebenhaar's socialist (and at the time rather unpopular) ideas and attitudes, but also of the effects some of these had on Lawrence who put his acquaintance with Siebenhaar to creative use in writing his 'Australian' novel Kangaroo, particularly with regard to the fictional character Willie Struthers.
The Evolving Literature of Australian Exploration Paul Genoni , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Subverting the Empire : Explorers and Exploration in Australian Fiction 2004; (p. 71-96)
The Passing of Dead Dog Nettie Palmer , 1934 single work essay
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 November vol. 55 no. 2858 1934; (p. 2, 5)
Discusses the contrasting views of the Australian landscape presented by these writers.
The Fox and Kangaroo: 'Non-Human Human Being' Jeff Wallace , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: D. H. Lawrence, Science and the Posthuman 2005; (p. 141-146)
Wallace argues that in The Fox (1923) and Kangaroo (1923) 'the human being is an animal. He discusses the meaning of this equivalence by examining the differences suggested through the narrative form of the two works.
Aaron's Rod, Kangaroo, The Plumed Serpent: Anti-Capitalism and the Post-Humanistic Jeff Wallace , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: D. H. Lawrence, Science and the Posthuman 2005; (p. 218-227)
Wallace collectively views three of Lawrence's 1920s novels: Aaron's Rod, Kangaroo and The Plumed Serpent. He suggests that they 'represent a departure or leave-taking from the illusionist conventions of the realist novel to which, despite marked stylistic-modernistic idiosynracies, Lawrence's earlier fiction had adhered ... In each case the exiled, nomadic protagonist finds in an alternative culture - Italy, Australia, Mexico - a context in which to cease to care about conventional human values, to lapse into a state of isolation or, in the key word of Kangaroo, "indifference".'
Place, Colour and Sedition : D. H. Lawrence's Kangaroo, a Study in Environmental Values Humphrey McQueen , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Politics and Culture , no. 3 2006;
Comedy and Provisionality: Lawrence's Address to His Audience and Material in His Australian Novels Paul Eggert , 1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: Lawrence and Comedy 1996; (p. 131-157)
With particular reference to Lawrence's two Australian novels, Eggert argues that '[b]ehind the often earnest and passionate engagement with ideas and intense emotions - which, for so many people, is the Lawrentian trademark - lurks a form of comedy.'
D. H. Lawrence and the Fear of Bungalows Frank Devine , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , January-February vol. 51 no. 1-2 2007; (p. 64-66)
Method and Options in Researching the Experience of Australia in the Writings of Travellers and Immigrants Rita Pasqualini , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia in the World : Perceptions and Possibilities 1994; (p. 113-123)
y The Married Man : a Life of D. H. Lawrence Brenda Maddox , London : Sinclair-Stevenson , 1949 Z1552811 1949 single work biography
This Australia Emily Bulcock , 1926 single work essay
— Appears in: Queensland Authors and Artists' Xmas Magazine. 1926; (p. 5 - 6)
Bulcock appeals to contemporary Australian writers to break away from the 'baleful influences' of the pioneering novel, portraying only hardship and suffering, and write of other, more positive aspects of Australian life.
Chapter Ten : D. H. Lawrence Susannah Fullerton , 2009 single work bibliography
— Appears in: Brief Encounters : Literary Travellers in Australia 1836-1939 2009; (p. 300-333)

'D. H. Lawrence came to Australia searching. He didn't know what he was actually looking for or where he would find it. But he had to get away from England, from Europe, and Australia was far enough away for him to search for 'something that brings me peace'.'

A Vacant Lot : D. H. Lawrence and the Sydney Real Estate Scene Stuart Mackenzie , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: The National Library Magazine , December vol. 1 no. 4 2009; (p. 12-15)
Stuart Mackenzie explores the genre of real estate literature through the National Library of Australia's historical sales plans.
Male Sexuality on the Frontier in D. H. Lawrence's Kangaroo Nancy L Paxton , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Windows to the Sun : D.H. Lawrence's Thought-Adventures 2009; (p. 138-164)

'When D.H. Lawrence arrived in Australia in 1922, he defined himself, as Judith Ruderman remindsus, as 'a man without a country'; he had, by this time in his life, taken many bold steps to become a man no longer 'firmly moored in his class, nation, or gender' (Ruderman 2003, 50). Lawrence frequently used gendered terms to describe the tantalizing appeal of crossing the border between the old world and the new, proclaiming, in Fantasia of the Unconscious, for example: 'You've got to know you're a man, and being a man means you must go on alone, ahead of the woman, to break a way through the old world into the new' (2004a, 218). Kangaroo presents Lawrence's first sustained attempt to respond to this call. He begins by describing Richard Lovatt Somer's realization that the old world was 'done for' and his imperative desire to go to 'the newest country, to young Australia' (1994, 13), a desire impelled by many of the same impulses that induced the Lawrences to make a similar journey. Nonetheless, from nearly the first page of this oddly uneven novel, Lawrence draws attention to Somers's English ideas about maleness, friendship, sexual desire, Marriage, power, class politics, and violence, as he describes his protagonist's increasingly more disorienting confrontations with Australian men who embody alternative ideas about male identity.' (p. 138)

Reading 'Walkabout' in the 1930s Mitchell Rolls , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 2 no. 2010;
'The Australian magazine Walkabout, loosely modelled on National Geographic, was published between 1934 and 1974, with a concluding single edition being issued in January 1978. Unlike National Geographic, the very middlebrow Walkabout has attracted little critical scrutiny. The few responses to Walkabout have predominantly criticised its role in fomenting a specific version of the settlement myth, in particular that of promoting white progress and modernisation of the outback against a projected Aboriginal absence. Leaving aside its representation of Aborigines (this matter is dealt with in a forthcoming essay) this paper argues that at least in the first decade of Walkabout's long run, its warmth for and promotion of Australia, particularly the interior and remote regions, is distinctive when contrasted with the nationalist fervour of other contemporary movements, and that ideologically-bound criticism overlooks the more nuanced forms of settler belonging the magazine facilitated.' (Author's abstract)
Long Journey to Canvas Via the Movie Joyce Morgan , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 2 November 2011; (p. 14)
Gary Shead's early films are unique social documents writes Joyce Morgan.
Literary Heroes Forgotten Michael Heywood , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 22 January 2012; (p. 9)
'Falling Out of a Picture': The Australian Landscape in D. H. Lawrence's Kangaroo Cheryl Hindrichs , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: D. H. Lawrence Review , vol. 36 no. 2 2011; (p. 43-71)
Inside out in Australia Peter Ellingsen , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 71 no. 1 2012; (p. 56-62)
'The notion of an inner life - just like the idea of an inland - has long been equated with emptiness in Australia. Terms such as 'dead heart' to denote the red centre and 'outback' to describe regions outside coastal cities suggest that, in Australia, the inner is on the outer. Even in the metropolis there is, as D.H. Lawrence noted when he visited Sydney, a terrifying vacancy. Australians, he wrote in his novel Kangaroo, were 'awfully nice but they have got nothing inside them'. For Patrick White, this was the Great Australian Emptiness, an environment in which 'the mind is the least of possessions, in which the rich man is the important man, in which the schoolmaster and the journalist rule what intellectual roost there is ...' (Author's abstract)
'Did He Want to Mix and Mate with this Man?' : Mateship, Modernism and Homoerotic Primitivism Damien Barlow , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 27 no. 1 2012; (p. 18-32)
Last amended 25 Sep 2014 08:31:25
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