y Kangaroo single work   novel  
First known date: 1923 Kangaroo Issue Details: First known date: 1923... 1923
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

Kangaroo, set in Australia, is D. H. Lawrence's eighth novel. He wrote the first draft in just forty-five days while living south of Sydney, in 1922, and revised it three months later in New Mexico. The descriptions of the country are among the most vivid and sympathetic ever penned, and the book fuses lightly disguised autobiography with an exploration of political ideas at an immensely personal level. His anxiety about the future of democracy, caught as it was in the turbulent cross currents of fascism and socialism, is only partly appeased by his vision of a new bond of comradeship between men based on their unique separateness. Lawrence's alter ego Richard Somers departs for America to continue his search.

Adaptations

form y Kangaroo Evan Jones , Australia : Western Pacific Films Naked Country Productions , 1987 7871581 1987 single work film/TV

'Adapted from D.H. Lawrence's story of love, violence and political intrigue, based on his personal experiences in Australia in 1922. 'Kangaroo' - the code name of the charismatic leader of a secret fascist army - brings all his dark power to bear to seduce the writer into embracing his ideas, but the writer and his wife find strength in their love reawakened in the exotic southern land.'

Source: Screen Australia.

y Kangaroo David Britton , United Kingdom (UK) : British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) , 2000 8145728 2000 single work radio play

'Set in Australia in 1922, Kangaroo tells the story of English writer Lovat and his wife, who arrive in Sydney in search of a new life.'

Source:

Radio Times, 2 March 2000, p.124.

Notes

  • Brief extract published in the Age, 6 February 1995, Student Upate, p.4.
  • First published in September 1923 in both New York and London.
  • For details of textual variations and variant endings see notes in the Cambridge edition 1994.
  • Other formats: Also sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Thomas Seltzer ,
      1923 .
      Extent: 421p.
      Note/s:
      • Includes the author's later corrections; ending differs from English ed. 1923.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins , 1989 .
      Extent: xii, 418p.p.
      Edition info: Corrected ed.
      Note/s:
      • Text follows the corrected edition published by Seltzer 1923.
      • Foreword by Raymond Southall.
      ISBN: 0732225736 (pbk.)
    • Potts Point, Kings Cross area, Inner Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: ETT Imprint , 1995 .
      Extent: xii, 418p.p.
      Edition info: Corrected ed.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Text follows the corrected edition published by Seltzer 1923.
      • Foreword by Raymond Southall.
      ISBN: 1875892141 (pbk.)
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Martin Secker ,
      1923 .
      Extent: 402p.
      Note/s:
      • Does not include the author's later corrections; They were included in the Seltzer edition. Ending differs from American edition.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Penguin Books ; Heinemann ,
      1950 .
      Extent: 394p.
      Reprinted: 1954 , 1960 , 1963 , 1968 , 1971 , 1976 , 1975 , 1977
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Richard Aldington.
      Series: Penguin Books Penguin Books (publisher), series - publisher Number in series: 751
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Heinemann ,
      1955 .
      Extent: x, 367 p.p.
      Reprinted: 1960
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Richard Aldington.
      • Phoenix edition of D.H. Lawrence
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Heinemann , 1963 .
      Extent: 401p.
      Note/s:
      • Critical notes by James Gribble.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Heron Books ,
      1969 .
      Extent: x, 366 p.p.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by Richard Aldington; original illustrations by by Michael Jackson.

Works about this Work

y DH Lawrence's 99 Days in Australia : Volume Two : The Silvery Freedom ... & the Horrible Paws Robert Darroch , Strawberry Hills : Svengall Press , 2016 10246648 2016 single work criticism

'The Silvery Freedom ... and the Horrible Paws is the story of how DH Lawrence's 8th major novel, Kangaroo, was composed and written. The title refers to Lawrence's realisation - half-way through writing the book - that he had stumbled on a secret para-military organisation in Australia in 1922. "It was as if," he wrote in Kangaroo, "the silvery freedom suddenly turned, and showed the scaly back of a reptile, and the horrible paws."

'This is a story that many people and interests tried to prevent coming out. It reveals the fascist underbelly of post-WW1 Australian society and politics.

'It is the second volume of the author's Lawrence's 99 Days in Australia, which together tell the story of how the 20th-century's most controversial author came to write his most surprising work of "fiction".' (Publication summary)

y DH Lawrence's 99 Days in Australia : Volume One : The Quest for Cooley 'The Quest for Colley' Robert Darroch , Strawberry Hills : Svengall Press , 2016 10246607 2016 single work criticism

'The Quest for Cooley is the story of the 40-year search for the identity of the real life figure that DH Lawrence portrayed as the Australian political leader Benjamin Cooley in his 1923 Australian novel, Kangaroo. Through his intensive research in Australia and overseas, Robert Darroch, a former investigative journalist on The Bulletin, discovered that Lawrence ran across an actual secret army in Sydney in 1922, and unmasked it in his novel of Australia. This is a story that many people and interests have tried to prevent coming out. It exposes the fascist underbelly - what Lawrence called "the horrible paws" - of post-WW1 Australian society and politics.' (Publication summary)

Lawrence and Australian Fascism Robert Darroch , 2015 single work correspondence
— Appears in: Quadrant , September vol. 59 no. 9 2015; (p. 3-4)
The World a New Leaf Daniel O'Neil , 2015 single work essay
— Appears in: Quadrant , May vol. 59 no. 5 2015; (p. 82-84)
y D. H. Lawrence's Australia : Anxiety at the Edge of Empire David Game , Burlington : Ashgate , 2015 8271652 2015 single work criticism

'The first full-length account of D. H. Lawrence’s rich engagement with a country he found both fascinating and frustrating, D. H. Lawrence’s Australia focuses on the philosophical, anthropological and literary influences that informed the utopian and regenerative visions that characterise so much of Lawrence’s work. David Game gives particular attention to the four novels and one novella published between 1920 and 1925, what Game calls Lawrence’s “Australian period,” shedding new light on Lawrence’s attitudes towards Australia in general and, more specifically, towards Australian Aborigines, women and colonialism. He revisits key aspects of Lawrence’s development as a novelist and thinker, including the influence of Darwin and Lawrence’s rejection of eugenics, Christianity, psychoanalysis and science. While Game concentrates on the Australian novels such as Kangaroo and The Boy in the Bush, he also uncovers the Australian elements in a range of other works, including Lawrence’s last novel, Lady Chatterley’s Lover. Lawrence lived in Australia for just three months, but as Game shows, it played a significant role in his quest for a way of life that would enable regeneration of the individual in the face of what Lawrence saw as the moral collapse of modern industrial civilisation after the outbreak of World War I.' (Publication summary)

Two Sides to the Story : Against Mindy Laube , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6-7 January 2007; (p. 32)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Two Sides to the Story : For Matthew Thompson , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 6-7 January 2007; (p. 32)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Made in Heaven Frank Kermode , 1994 single work review
— Appears in: London Review of Books , 10 November vol. 16 no. 21 1994; (p. 24-25)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Lawrence's Works Gain from Local Connection Christopher Pollnitz , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 1 March 1995; (p. 28)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
Untitled Frances Devlin-Glass , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , March no. 44 1995; (p. 103-104)

— Review of Kangaroo D. H. Lawrence 1923 single work novel
The Dutch-Australian Connection : Willem Siebenhaar, D. H. Lawrence, Max Havelaar and Kangaroo Paul Eggert , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 21 no. 1 2003; (p. 3-19)
This thoroughly researched article traces the life and work of Dutch-born left-wing activist, theosophist, scholar and poet Willem Siebenhaar who moved to Western Australia in 1891, and his connection with D. H. Lawrence, whom he met in 1922 and who helped him secure publication for a translation of Multatuli's Max Havelaar. Drawing on archival material such as Siebenhaar's correspondence, and on the letters of Lawrence, the article provides evidence not only of Siebenhaar's socialist (and at the time rather unpopular) ideas and attitudes, but also of the effects some of these had on Lawrence who put his acquaintance with Siebenhaar to creative use in writing his 'Australian' novel Kangaroo, particularly with regard to the fictional character Willie Struthers.
The Evolving Literature of Australian Exploration Paul Genoni , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Subverting the Empire : Explorers and Exploration in Australian Fiction 2004; (p. 71-96)
The Passing of Dead Dog Nettie Palmer , 1934 single work essay
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 21 November vol. 55 no. 2858 1934; (p. 2, 5)
Discusses the contrasting views of the Australian landscape presented by these writers.
The Fox and Kangaroo: 'Non-Human Human Being' Jeff Wallace , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: D. H. Lawrence, Science and the Posthuman 2005; (p. 141-146)
Wallace argues that in The Fox (1923) and Kangaroo (1923) 'the human being is an animal. He discusses the meaning of this equivalence by examining the differences suggested through the narrative form of the two works.
Aaron's Rod, Kangaroo, The Plumed Serpent: Anti-Capitalism and the Post-Humanistic Jeff Wallace , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: D. H. Lawrence, Science and the Posthuman 2005; (p. 218-227)
Wallace collectively views three of Lawrence's 1920s novels: Aaron's Rod, Kangaroo and The Plumed Serpent. He suggests that they 'represent a departure or leave-taking from the illusionist conventions of the realist novel to which, despite marked stylistic-modernistic idiosynracies, Lawrence's earlier fiction had adhered ... In each case the exiled, nomadic protagonist finds in an alternative culture - Italy, Australia, Mexico - a context in which to cease to care about conventional human values, to lapse into a state of isolation or, in the key word of Kangaroo, "indifference".'
Last amended 25 Sep 2014 08:31:25
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