8756468892522681890.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
7378077231514075931.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
4191111894998444111.jpg
This image has been sourced from online.
y Riders in the Chariot single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1961 1961
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Patrick White's brilliant 1961 novel, set in an Australian suburb, intertwines four deeply different lives. An Aborigine artist, a Holocaust survivor, a beatific washerwoman, and a childlike heiress are each blessed—and stricken—with visionary experiences that may or may not allow them to transcend the machinations of their fellow men. Tender and lacerating, pure and profane, subtle and sweeping, Riders in the Chariot is one of the Nobel Prize winner's boldest books. (Publication summary)

Notes

  • Dedication: For Klari Daniel and Ben Huebsch
  • Epigraph: Excerpt from William Blake's The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, 'A Memorable Fancy', plates 12-13.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking , 1961 .
      Extent: 532p.
      Reprinted: 1974
      Note/s:
      • Published in October 1961.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1961 .
      Extent: 492p.
      Note/s:
      • Reprinted eight times by 1992 with an 'Australian Issue' in 1974.
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Macmillan , 1961 .
      Extent: 532p.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1964 .
      8756468892522681890.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 491p.
      ISBN: 014002185X (pbk.)
      Series: Penguin Modern Classics series - publisher
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Avon Books , 1975 .
      Extent: 542p.
      ISBN: 0380004674
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jonathan Cape , 1976 .
      Extent: 552p.
      ISBN: 0224011928
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1993 .
      7378077231514075931.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 496p.
      Note/s:
      • Published July 1993
      ISBN: 9780140186345
      Series: Penguin Classics Penguin Books (publisher), series - publisher
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage , 1994 .
      Extent: 552p.
      Reprinted: 1996
      ISBN: 0099323915
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      The New York Review of Books , 2002 .
      4191111894998444111.jpg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: x, 643 p.p.
      Note/s:
      • Introduction by David Malouf.
      ISBN: 1590170024
Alternative title: De frya utkorade
Language: Swedish
    • Stockholm,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Bonniers , 1964 .
      Extent: 520p.
      Reprinted: 1973

Works about this Work

The Boredom and Futility of War in Patrick White's Fiction Annalisa Pes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , April no. 15 2016; (p. 65-73)
This article investigates the representation of war in terms of uselessness and waste in the fiction of Patrick White, with a particular emphasis on the short story “After Alep”, written in 1945 when the writer was enrolled in the RAF as an Intelligence Officer. By analysing the story in the light of White’s approach to the war as to “the most horrifying and wasteful period” of his life (Marr 1992: 493), the article attempts to demonstrate how the narrative devices used by White contribute to demythologize the rhetoric of the war and of war heroes in a way that may be instrumental in conveying a message of peace out of the ultimate sense of futility transmitted by any war.
Patrick White, Composer Manqué : The Centrality of Music in White's Artistic Aspiration John Carmody , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 29 no. 1 2015; (p. 153-161)
'Australian writer Patrick White was burdened with the reputation of a misanthrope. This was, perhaps, self-inflicted but it allowed many to disregard the sensitivity and insights of his writing. It is nevertheless surprising that most critics and readers seem unaware of his deep engagement with music. Certainly, few (if any) literary critics appear to recognize the significance of music in his output. Here, Carmody contends that not only was music profoundly important to White as a human being, but that it fundamentally drove his work. Without a recognition of this crucial importance of music, it is impossible to understand adequately White's aesthetic aspiration.' (Publication abstract)
Worlding Options : Conflation of Personal and Physical Space in Patrick White’s Novels 2015 single work
— Appears in: Rupkatha Journal on Interdisciplinary Studies in Humanities , September-December vol. 7 no. 3 2015;
'Great texts that have accrued literary renown over the years and across space, time and genre, are those that are able to project universal sentiments. But simultaneously these texts feature a conscious engagement with the constituent space(s) that are unique to their creation or generation. Every text, then, as it naturally appears, has its singular framework or modality of engagement(s) with space. This article seeks to illustrate how Australian novelist Patrick White’s novels enshrine philosophical, and sometimes metaphysical explorations of the nature of spatiality that the self has to contend with as an unavoidable burden of living itself and clarify the singular, pivotal role that spatiality plays in determining individual responses to specific situations and decision-making processes.' (Publication summary)
On Reading and Re-reading Patrick White John Barnes , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Cambridge Quarterly , September vol. 43 no. 3 2014; (p. 212-230)
'Few writers have received as much attention and have been so little understood as Patrick White, the only Australian to win the Nobel Prize for Literature. Critics have found his novels demanding and puzzling, and have been divided over the nature of his achievement. This essay points to the failure of critics to recognise the extent of the influence of Flaubert as well as that of the English modernists on White, and discusses the kind of attentiveness that his writing demands of the reader.' (Publication abstract)
'Are You For Magic?' Patrick White and Camp Peter Kirkpatrick , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , November vol. 29 no. 4 2014; (p. 1-18)
Patrick White A Theatre of His Own Andrew Fuhrmann , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 356 2013;
Ladies and Gentlemen? Language, Body and Identity in The Aunt's Story and The Twyborn Affair Bridget Grogan , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October vol. 28 no. 3 2013; (p. 59-71)
Sarsaparilla : A Calypso i "Fifty years past, for a fact,", Alan Wearne , 2012 single work poetry
— Appears in: Fifty-One Contemporary Poets from Australia
A Fringe of Leaves : Australian Modernity and Southern Perspectives Raewyn Connell , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum : Journal of Media & Cultural Studies , vol. 26 no. 2 2012; (p. 207-214)
'Patrick White's novel A Fringe of Leaves, written in the 1970s, resonated with a renewed questioning of the European presence on Australian land and its significance for cultural issues. A debate about coloniality in the social sciences is now happening globally, especially questioning the global North's apparent monopoly of theory. Multiple structures of knowledge are found in the colonized world: indigenous knowledges, the analysis of colonialism by the colonized, and analysis of the societies and global structures produced by imperialism. Key authors on these topics are introduced. Australian modernity needs to be considered in the light of the lively debates about these issues now occurring across the global South.' (Author's abstract)
Books that Changed Me : Annie Hauxwell Annie Hauxwell , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 29 July 2012; (p. 14)
The Best of 2012 Australian Art : Literature Geordie Williamson , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Monthly , October no. 83 2012; (p. 66)
Patrick White's Riders in the Chariot (1961) : An Anti-Suburban Novel? Nathanael O'Reilly , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Exploring Suburbia: The Suburbs in the Contemporary Australian Novel 2012; (p. 1-43)
A Mt Wilson Model for Xanadu in Patrick White's Riders in the Chariot Susan Lever , 2012 single work essay
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 12 no. 3 2012;
The Solid Mandala and Patrick White’s Late Modernity Nicholas Birns , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'This essay contends that the Australian novelist Patrick White (1912-1990) presents, in his novel The Solid Mandala (1966), a prototypical evocation of late modernity that indicates precisely why and how it was different from the neoliberal and postmodern era that succeeded it. Late modernity is currently emerging as a historical period, though still a nascent and contested one. Robert Hassan speaks of the 1950-1970 era as a period which, in its 'Fordist' mode of production maintained a certain conformity yet held off the commoditisation of later neoliberalism's 'network-driven capitalism'. This anchors the sense of 'late modernity,' that will operate in this essay, though my sense of the period also follows on definitions of the term established, in very different contexts, by Edward Lucie-Smith and Tyrus Miller.' (Author's introduction)
Rearranging the Dead Cat Bruce Pascoe , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 2 2011; (p. 14-23)
The Chariot of Fire: Terrorism, Liberalism, and the Mystic Attitude Peter Murphy , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Terror and Form 2011; (p. 207-224)
Teeth Whitening : An Exploration of Teeth in Riders in the Chariot Grant Thornhill , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Explicator , October-December vol. 69 no. 4 2011; (p. 193-197)
'According to David Marr's biography, Patrick White suffered acutely from dental problems during his life. The debilitating effects stemming from those problems are reflected in White's fiction, which shows a marked preoccupation with the state of its characters' teeth. Teeth imagery recurs in character descriptions throughout his work, including Voss, The Solid Mandala, and The Prodigal Son. White's distinctive use of teeth imagery is equally present in Riders in the Chariot. This essay explores the significance of teeth in Riders in the Chariot and argues that descriptions of teeth are indicative of the inner moral, ethical, or spiritual fibre of White's characters.' (Author's introduction)
Jack Lindsay, Patrick White, and Postcolonial Medievalism Nicholas Birns , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 41-54)
New York City Limits : Australian Novels and American Print Culture Roger Osborne , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 299-308)
'One of the questions posed by this conference is, 'Why has Australia received so little attention in US literary circles?' This paper aims to propose an answer to that question by identifying American editions of Australian novels and by widely surveying reviews of these novels in journals and newspapers throughout the twentieth century. This survey will rely on searches conducted via the online version of the Book Review Digest and will be informed by Richard Ohmann's Politics of Letters (1987). Drawing on several sociological studies and other empirical data, Ohmann argues that canonization in the USA has relied on a small group of professional readers and a similarly small number of newspapers and journals in which these books were discussed, most of which were based within New York City limits. While Australian novels might not have been considered for canonization, the established print culture networks through which they moved ultimately influenced their critical and commercial success. Examining the degree to which Australian novels were included in the 'book talk' of these print culture networks provides a suitable foundation for statements about the space provided for Australian novels in US print culture. Ultimately, the limited and irregular inclusion of Australia in the 'book talk' of a small number of New York intellectuals and periodicals goes a long way to explaining why Australia has received so little attention in US literary circles.' (Author's abstract)
y Writing the Nation : Patrick White and the Indigene Cynthia Van Den Driesen , Amsterdam New York (City) : Rodopi , 2009 Z1552502 2009 single work criticism

'The time for new approaches to White's work is overdue. Central to the present study are Edward Said's ideas about the role of the intellectual (and the writer) - of speaking "truth to power," and also the importance of tracing the "affiliations" of a text and its embeddedness in the world. This approach is not incompatible with Jung's theory of the 'great' artist and his capacity to answer the deep-seated psychic needs of his people.

'White's work has contributed in many different ways to the writing of the nation. The spiritual needs of a young nation such as Australia must also comprehend its continual urge towards self-definition. Explored here is one important aspect of that challenge: white Australia's dealings with the indigenous people of the land, tracing the significance of the Aboriginal presence in three texts selected from the oeuvre of Patrick White: Voss (1957), Riders in the Chariot (1961), and A Fringe of Leaves (1976). Each of these texts interrogates European culture's denigration of the non-European Other as embedded in the discourse of orientalism.

'One central merit of White's commanding perspective is the constant close attention he pays to European hubris and to the paramount autonomy of indigenous culture. There is evidence even of a project which can be articulated as a search for the possibility of white indigeneity, the potential for the white settler's belonging within the land as does the indigene.' (Publisher's website)

Fiction Chronicle Harry Payne Heseltine , 1961 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , December vol. 20 no. 4 1961; (p. 474-491)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Patrick White's Chariot Max Harris , 1961 single work review
— Appears in: Nation , 21 October 1961; (p. 21-2)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
White's Triumphal Chariot Geoffrey Dutton , 1961 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November vol. 1 no. 1 1961; (p. 1-3)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled 1961 single work review
— Appears in: Commonweal , 24 November no. 75 1961; (p. 235)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled 1961 single work review
— Appears in: New Statesman , 3 November no. 62 1961; (p. 653)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled 1961 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 8 October 1961; (p. 4)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled 1961 single work review
— Appears in: Saturday Review , 7 October no. 44 1961; (p. 39)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled 1961 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 15 December 1961; (p. 889)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
The Way through Suburbia Margaret Aughterson , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Prospect , vol. 5 no. 1 1962; (p. 30-31)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled O. N. Burgess , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Quarterly , vol. 34 no. 1 1962; (p. 110-113)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled James McAuley , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Quadrant , Autumn vol. 6 no. 2 1962; (p. 79-81)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Review by the Judges Colin Roderick , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Bohemia : The All-Australian Literary Magazine , June vol. 14 no. 12 1962; (p. 3-4)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
White Rides Again Marie McWally , 1962 single work review
— Appears in: Dissent , vol. 2 no. 2 1962; (p. 24-5)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Untitled F. M. (fl. 1955-1970) , 1965 single work review
— Appears in: Advocate: A Weekly Catholic Journal , 25 March 1965; (p. 18)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
White's Triumphal Chariot Geoffrey Dutton , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Critical Essays on Patrick White 1990; (p. 52-57)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Second Look Peter Craven , 1999 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 12 September 1999; (p. 13)

— Review of Riders in the Chariot Patrick White 1961 single work novel
Imagery and Structure in Patrick White's Novels Karin Hansson , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Breaking Circles 1991; (p. 175-181)
Patrick White and the Aesthetics of Death Noel Macainsh , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 15 no. 2 1987; (p. 2-14) The Pathos of Distance 1992; (p. 290-303)
Mandala Symbolism in the Novels of Patrick White Shaik Samad , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 117-123)
Patrick White: An International Perspective John Colmer , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Breaking Circles 1991; (p. 182-196)
God, History, and Patrick White Veronica Brady , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 19 no. 2 2005; (p. 172-176)
Examines Patrick White's treatment of theology and its role in post-World War II Australian life.
Abyssinia Lost and Regained Manfred Mackenzie , 1963 single work criticism
— Appears in: Essays in Criticism , July vol. 13 no. 3 1963; (p. 292-300)
A Green Flaw in the Crystal Glass : Patrick White's Riders in the Chariot Iris Ralph , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Colloquy : Text Theory Critique , November no. 12 2006;

'The argument of this paper is that Mary Hare, one of the four principal characters in a slightly later novel by White, Riders in the Chariot, is the most pronounced of White's ecological avatars. She is a green interloper in the "glass house" (RC35) of Xanadu, an imposing estate on the outskirts of Sydney, built by Mary's father Norbert. Norbert's metaphysical pretensions, like the metaphysical pursuits of Voss, are deeply anthropocentric and blind him to the ecogenic subject of the ecogenic environment around him. He exploits it or disregards it in his design of Xanadu. The ecocritical content of Riders in the Chariot, and of White's writing as a whole, hardly has been spoken to by scholars. I argue this is central to any discussion of White and, further, that this content is central to White's metaphysical themes.'

Source: Colloquy : Text Theory Critique, no.12 November 2006 Sighted: 12/07/2007

Riders in the Chariot : A Tale for Our Times Bernadette Brennan , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 7 no. 2007; (p. 32-45) Remembering Patrick White : Contemporary Critical Essays 2010;
'This article rereads Patrick White's Riders in the Chariot against some of the past criticism of the text. It argues that the text has much to say about the contemporary politics of fear operating in Australia and demonstrates that many of the historical readings of White as an elitist, alienated Modernist cannot be sustained. The contemporary relevance and force of this novel arises from a double movement: the beauty of White's prose operates continually to allow us to perceive the "infinite in everything" but it also helps us understand the absolutely ordinary fears and insecurities of the suburban Australian consciousness. Through the ordinary everydayness of his Australian characters (other than the riders) we see all too clearly how the ignorance and prejudice of a very small few have the ability to snowball with catastrophic consequences. Himmelfarb, in the face of horror, turned away from literature believing that intellectual reasoning had failed humanity. Today it is the fear of intellectual reasoning that has the potential to make us all less than we have the potential to be.' (Author's abstract)
Atonement and the Crime of Seeing : Patrick White's Riders in the Chariot Gavin D'Costa , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature and Theology , vol. 22 no. 2 2008; (p. 162-179)
"Patrick White's 'religious' vision in 'Riders in the Chariot' is explored. Against readings from a Jewish perspective, a Christian perspective or a secular non-religious perspective, this article proposes an alternative. It suggests that White brings together a synthetic vision in which three religious traditions are affirmed as complimentary with a new fourth, the artist as religious visionary. In doing so, White respects the deep differences between these traditions while also drawing on an analogical commonality: the redemptive value of suffering and the nature of an unfinished atonement within our lives." (162)
y Writing the Nation : Patrick White and the Indigene Cynthia Van Den Driesen , Amsterdam New York (City) : Rodopi , 2009 Z1552502 2009 single work criticism

'The time for new approaches to White's work is overdue. Central to the present study are Edward Said's ideas about the role of the intellectual (and the writer) - of speaking "truth to power," and also the importance of tracing the "affiliations" of a text and its embeddedness in the world. This approach is not incompatible with Jung's theory of the 'great' artist and his capacity to answer the deep-seated psychic needs of his people.

'White's work has contributed in many different ways to the writing of the nation. The spiritual needs of a young nation such as Australia must also comprehend its continual urge towards self-definition. Explored here is one important aspect of that challenge: white Australia's dealings with the indigenous people of the land, tracing the significance of the Aboriginal presence in three texts selected from the oeuvre of Patrick White: Voss (1957), Riders in the Chariot (1961), and A Fringe of Leaves (1976). Each of these texts interrogates European culture's denigration of the non-European Other as embedded in the discourse of orientalism.

'One central merit of White's commanding perspective is the constant close attention he pays to European hubris and to the paramount autonomy of indigenous culture. There is evidence even of a project which can be articulated as a search for the possibility of white indigeneity, the potential for the white settler's belonging within the land as does the indigene.' (Publisher's website)

Imagining the Real : Patrick White's Literary-Political Career Brigid Rooney , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literary Activists : Australian Writer-Intellectuals and Public Life 2009; (p. 29-56)
Perception, Convention, Expectation and Transformation : Representations of Aborigines in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Creative Nation : Australian Cinema and Cultural Studies Reader 2009; (p. 253-277)
Synthetics Surveillance and Sarsaparilla : Patrick White and the New Gossip Economy Lorraine Burdett , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2009;
This essay proposes a new model for reading Patrick White's novels of the 1960s in their treatment of the tensions between the rights of individuals and their relation to 'the group', charting the circulations of exclusion inherent within this dynamic. I argue these novels are connected with a preoccupation of postwar American literary fiction that rehearses the experience of the individual whose identity lies in peril at the hands of a collective regulatory consciousness.

In this essay I contend that White deploys the synthetic matter of his time as a means for exploring the synthesis of human connections formed through social organization. I argue that White's treatment of the anti-suburban American tradition is distinct for its exploration of the threat suburbia poses in its outward spread towards the edges of civilization, as it destroys the organic unpredictability and artistry of nature, and eradicates human agency.
y Between the City and the Bush: Suburbia in the Contemporary Australian Novel Nathanael O'Reilly , Kalamazoo : 2008 Z1612172 2008 single work thesis 'Australia's most important national narratives take place in the bush, the outback, and overseas. The dominant representations of Australia, both within the nation and abroad, focus on the outback, the bush and the cities. However, Australia is one of the most suburban societies in the world, and has been since the mid-nineteenth-century. Nevertheless, Australian novels are rarely set in suburbia. Between the City and the Bush examines representations of suburbia in contemporary Australian novels. Focusing on the relationship between colonialism, the physical development of suburbia and the anti-suburban intellectual tradition, my chapters address a number of issues, including immigration, environmental degradation, Indigenous rights, non-indigenous belonging, alcohol and drug abuse, domestic violence, sexuality, religion and spirituality, and the role of the artist in society. This dissertation outlines the history of the anti-suburban intellectual tradition within Australia, the connections between the British, American and Australian anti-suburban intellectual traditions, and the effect of the anti-suburban tradition on Australian literature and Australian literary criticism, before proceeding to analyze eleven novels. This project examines novels published between 1961 and 2005, demonstrating the establishment, development and perpetuation of the anti-suburban tradition in the Australian novel. The second and third chapters argue against the dominant critical perception of Patrick White's canonical novels Riders in the Chariot (1961) and The Solid Mandala (1966) as anti-suburban, contending that White's novels present suburbia ambivalently, including both celebratory and disparaging representations. I demonstrate that the anti-suburban tradition in the Australian novel was established by George Johnston with his classic novel My Brother Jack (1964), and show that the anti-suburban tradition was perpetuated throughout the following four decades by David Malouf, Tim Winton, Melissa Lucashenko and A.L. McCann. In the final two chapters, I argue that Gerald Murnane and Peter Carey reject the anti-suburban tradition and utilize suburbia as a setting for fictional experimentation and intensive engagement with social issues, demonstrating that suburbia, the site in which most Australian live, contains a wealth of subjects for novelists' (author's abstract).
Intimate Distance : Patrick White and the Australian Sacred Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 33-68)
The Evolution of Artistic Faith in Patrick Whites Riders in the Chariot Meg Harris Williams , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ariel , October vol. 40 no. 4 2009; (p. 47-67)
Jack Lindsay, Patrick White, and Postcolonial Medievalism Nicholas Birns , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 41-54)
New York City Limits : Australian Novels and American Print Culture Roger Osborne , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 299-308)
'One of the questions posed by this conference is, 'Why has Australia received so little attention in US literary circles?' This paper aims to propose an answer to that question by identifying American editions of Australian novels and by widely surveying reviews of these novels in journals and newspapers throughout the twentieth century. This survey will rely on searches conducted via the online version of the Book Review Digest and will be informed by Richard Ohmann's Politics of Letters (1987). Drawing on several sociological studies and other empirical data, Ohmann argues that canonization in the USA has relied on a small group of professional readers and a similarly small number of newspapers and journals in which these books were discussed, most of which were based within New York City limits. While Australian novels might not have been considered for canonization, the established print culture networks through which they moved ultimately influenced their critical and commercial success. Examining the degree to which Australian novels were included in the 'book talk' of these print culture networks provides a suitable foundation for statements about the space provided for Australian novels in US print culture. Ultimately, the limited and irregular inclusion of Australia in the 'book talk' of a small number of New York intellectuals and periodicals goes a long way to explaining why Australia has received so little attention in US literary circles.' (Author's abstract)
Aboriginal Representations in Australian Texts Vijay C. Mishra , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: Continuum: The Australian Journal of Media & Culture , vol. 2 no. 1 1987;
The Solid Mandala and Patrick White’s Late Modernity Nicholas Birns , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Transnational Literature , November vol. 4 no. 1 2011;
'This essay contends that the Australian novelist Patrick White (1912-1990) presents, in his novel The Solid Mandala (1966), a prototypical evocation of late modernity that indicates precisely why and how it was different from the neoliberal and postmodern era that succeeded it. Late modernity is currently emerging as a historical period, though still a nascent and contested one. Robert Hassan speaks of the 1950-1970 era as a period which, in its 'Fordist' mode of production maintained a certain conformity yet held off the commoditisation of later neoliberalism's 'network-driven capitalism'. This anchors the sense of 'late modernity,' that will operate in this essay, though my sense of the period also follows on definitions of the term established, in very different contexts, by Edward Lucie-Smith and Tyrus Miller.' (Author's introduction)
Last amended 16 Oct 2014 17:20:05
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