Source: Publisher's website
y Voss : A Novel single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1957 1957
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Set in nineteenth-century Australia, Voss is the story of the secret passion between an explorer and a naïve young woman. Although they have met only a few times, Voss and Laura are joined by overwhelming, obsessive feelings for each other. Voss sets out to cross the continent. As hardships, mutiny and betrayal whittle away his power to endure and to lead, his attachment to Laura gradually increases. Laura, waiting in Sydney, moves through the months of separation as if they were a dream and Voss the only reality.

From the careful delineation of Victorian society to the sensitive rendering of hidden love to the stark narrative of adventure in the Australian desert, Patrick White's novel is a work of extraordinary power and virtuosity.'

Source: Random House Books (Sighted 21/09/2012)

Adaptations

y Voss : Opera in Two Acts After the Novel by Patrick White David Malouf , Richard Meale (composer), Grosvenor Place : Australian Music Centre , 1980-1989 Z272889 1980-1989 single work musical theatre opera

Voss was adapted into an opera by author David Malouf and composer Richard Meale. It was first performed by the Australian Opera in Adelaide, March 1986.

Notes

  • Dedication: For Marie d'Estournelles de Constant
  • In a letter to Hu Wenzhong, White refers to a Russian edition, but this has not been traced.
  • Other formats: Also braille and sound recording.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Eyre and Spottiswoode , 1957 .
      Extent: 478p.
      Reprinted: 1962 , 1968
      Note/s:
      • First published 3 December 1957. Reprinted three times in 1958.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Viking , 1957 .
      Extent: 442p.
      Reprinted: 1974
      Note/s:
      • First published in August 1957. Reprinted twice.
    • Toronto, Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Macmillan , 1957 .
      Extent: 442p.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Mitcham, Blackburn - Mitcham - Vermont area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1960 .
      Extent: 448p.
      Note/s:
      • Reprinted twenty-one times by 1993.
      • Australian issue 1974.
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Avon Books , 1975 .
      Extent: 445p.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Jonathan Cape , 1980 .
      Extent: 478p.
      ISBN: 022401773X
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage , 1994 .
      Extent: 478p.
      ISBN: 0099324717
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Vintage Australia , 2012 .
      Source: Publisher's website
      Extent: 464p.
      Edition info: Vintage Classic edition
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 01/10/2012
      ISBN: 9781742756882
Alternative title: Voss : Roman
Language: German

Works about this Work

The Boredom and Futility of War in Patrick White's Fiction Annalisa Pes , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Le Simplegadi , April no. 15 2016; (p. 65-73)
This article investigates the representation of war in terms of uselessness and waste in the fiction of Patrick White, with a particular emphasis on the short story “After Alep”, written in 1945 when the writer was enrolled in the RAF as an Intelligence Officer. By analysing the story in the light of White’s approach to the war as to “the most horrifying and wasteful period” of his life (Marr 1992: 493), the article attempts to demonstrate how the narrative devices used by White contribute to demythologize the rhetoric of the war and of war heroes in a way that may be instrumental in conveying a message of peace out of the ultimate sense of futility transmitted by any war.
Your Country Is of Great Subtlety : Aspects of the Brazilian Translation of Patrick White’s Voss Ian Alexander , Monica Stefani , 2016 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ilha Do Desterro : A Journal of English Language , vol. 69 no. 2 2016;
'A number of the dialogues in Patrick White’s Voss (1957), especially those involving Laura Trevelyan, involve an implicit debate about what is meant by country and what it means to live in a country. Is the colony of New South Wales simply a province of the British Empire, a little piece of Britain transplanted on the other side of the world, or is it a place where British settlers will have to adapt their ways and gradually be transformed into something new? In these dialogues, each speaker makes use of words such as country, colony, property and land in order to express their vision of the place where they find themselves, frequently forcing a shift of meaning from one sentence to the next. This study examines how this debate is carried out in the novel and how it functions in Paulo Henriques Britto’s 1985 Brazilian translation.' (Publication summary)
26 Aussie Books You Must Read Blanche Clark , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 24 January 2015; (p. 18-19)
'With Australia Day upons us...26 great Australian Books that have helped shape and define our nation...'
Patrick White, Composer Manqué : The Centrality of Music in White's Artistic Aspiration John Carmody , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 29 no. 1 2015; (p. 153-161)
'Australian writer Patrick White was burdened with the reputation of a misanthrope. This was, perhaps, self-inflicted but it allowed many to disregard the sensitivity and insights of his writing. It is nevertheless surprising that most critics and readers seem unaware of his deep engagement with music. Certainly, few (if any) literary critics appear to recognize the significance of music in his output. Here, Carmody contends that not only was music profoundly important to White as a human being, but that it fundamentally drove his work. Without a recognition of this crucial importance of music, it is impossible to understand adequately White's aesthetic aspiration.' (Publication abstract)
Existentialist Thoughts in Voss Huang Liwei , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Oceanic Literary Studies , no. 2 2015; (p. 84-96)
'This paper analyses from the perspective of existentialism the novel Voss by Patrick White, in which Voss and Laura are converted from voluntarism to the pursuit of their authentic existences by the sufferings in the expedition. This paper concludes that White criticizes the nihilism inherent in the philosophical tradition of rationalism, promotes the pursuit of man's authentic existence, and explains the importance of the existentialist view of 'being-toward-death' to man's authentic existence illustrated by Voss and Laura's spiritual marriage and Voss' death. This paper points out that some of the White's philosophical ideas in Voss resonates with existentialism and , therefore, Voss is a classic novel with profound existential thoughts.' (84-85)
Nature Writ Large : Eco-Interpretation of Patrick White's Novels Xiang Lan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies – Proceedings of the 14th International Conference of Australian Studies in China 2015; (p. 86-97)
'This article seeks to reveal how Patrick White's ecological aesthetic sense is developed progressively in his major works. If we read his works in green fro the ecological content we can see nature writ large in series of his novels: The Tree of Man, a man's poetic dream of life in the bush is destroyed by the devastating effects of urban expansion; Voss, an ego-centric German's conquest of nature causes his failure and death in the Australian outback; in A Fringe of Leaves, a young woman's true nature is presented and when she is precipitated into the primitive, savage natural world she finds "the hero within" herself.' (86)
The Corpus of the Continent : Embodiments of Australia in World Literature Vilashini Cooppan , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 3 2015;

'What is the present status of imagining a continental scale for literature as it denotes something that is neither national, regional, nor global? How does a continental formation such as Australia’s invite a reframing of the national-global dichotomy so constitutive to the methodologies of world literature? Critical regionalisms, worlding, ‘planetary’ poetics, and systems-based and network analyses of culture, history, and literature all offer rich supplements to national-global thinking, as evidenced by recent developments in world literature theory. This paper turns to the category of continent as one that simultaneously conjures territorial place, geological time-scales, indigenous history, colonial projects, and postcolonial national politics and affiliations. How do these various vectors play out in making and remaking a sense of continental identity? In what ways do literary canons inflect this process? Given the function of canons as a memory discourses of a kind, how do the critical politics of memory structure a reading of Australian, African, Indo-Pakistani, European, or hemispheric American ‘continental literature’?

'This paper does not inventory any of these literatures but rather explores how thinking at a continental scale brings into focus particular aspects of a literary corpus: deep historical time, territorial inheritance, ghost presences of those who were here before, necropolitical violence, ecological being and nonanthropocentric relationality, and more. These aspects turn on various corporealizations or embodiments of a continent (land, canon), but they are also deeply indebted to what might be called continental corpses, that is, the dead who still walk the land, still claim their day, still await their incorporation, and still oblige us to confront the traumatic histories of the past. This paper turns to the landscape of memory, as configured in trauma theory, psychoanalytic theory, and memory studies, in order to theorize the category of continental literature as something distinct from, and certainly useful for, world literature.' (Publication abstract)

Leichhardt and Voss Revisited Angus Nicholls , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Patrick White beyond the Grave : New Critical Perspectives 2015; (p. 35-63)

In this essay Angus Nicholls gives a 'new reading of the German romanticism in Voss (1957)' [and] 'provides an inspiring example of what practised hands can do with the hoard.' (Introduction 7)

Elective Affinities Manning Clark, Patrick White and Sidney Nolan Mark McKenna , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Patrick White beyond the Grave : New Critical Perspectives 2015; (p. 81-100)

'Mark McKenna traces the ups and downs of another queer relationship, the oftentimes unreciprocated love of Australia's 'great' historian Manning Clark for the visionary he saw in White. He shows how Clark's monumental multi-volume History of Australia expresses greater allegiance to the preoccupations of Australia's 'elite' mid-century writers and artists, notably White and Sidney Nolan, than to the work of Clark's contemporaries in the academic discipline of history.' (Introduction 7-8)

On Using Words as Paint : Explaining the Art of Patrick White Michael Giffin , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , May vol. 58 no. 5 2014; (p. 92-97)
Heriot's Ithaka : Soul, Country and the Possibility of Home in To The Islands Bernadette Brennan , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'The final line of Randolph Stow's To the Islands - " 'My soul', he whispered, over the sea-surge, 'my should is a strange country'" - has perplexed and fascinated readers and critics for five decades. In 1975 Leonie Kramer found Stow's final sentence to be misplaced: ‘It belongs – if indeed it belongs at all – not at the end of a novel of this kind, but near the beginning'. At a time when interest in Stow and his work is again on the ascendency, this paper investigates what Heriot might have appreciated his soul to be, before arguing that he could not have spoken those resonant words until the very moment when he is blinded by illumination atop the coastal cliff. Heriot walks into homelessness in a quest for home. Like Cavafy's ideal voyager his journey is long and hard, and only once he discovers his soul can he appreciate he has no home. Only then can he understand the true meaning of the islands.' (Publication abstract)
Literature : A Step in the Right Direction Noela McNamara , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic , vol. 13 no. 1 2014;
'Literature offers the opportunity to encounter worlds beyond one’s own circumstances, environment, and situation. As an intercultural phenomenon, literary critique and analysis without borders can only be achieved by recognising cultural borders. Reading the literature of different cultures opens literary discourses to cross-cultural dialogue, but for too long, the lack of Indigenous literature within Australian literary discourses stymied the social potential of this intercultural phenomenon. Pressure from the global literary community has necessitated a vast shift of white consciousness to actively embrace narratives of different cultural dimensions, and novels that highlight cultural borders have become a key feature of Australian literature. Invisible literary borders have become apparent through exposure to the once silent voices that now emphasise messages of difference. Indigenous writers including Alexis Wright, Sally Morgan, Kim Scott, Jackie Huggins, Anita Heiss, Larissa Behrendt and Alice Nannup have opened reader consciousness to a broad scope of Indigenous perspectives. Within the arena of literary theories, the writer, reader and novels themselves have all had moments of glory, and while particular texts or authors have been immortalised, others have slipped into oblivion. Through the first person narrative of a non-Indigenous woman, this paper reveals how an intercultural literary experience revealed the restrictions of standard literary critique practices and inspired the creation of a relational discourse to engage with Indigenous voices as part of a methodological process. This intercultural literary process has the potential to inspire cultural awareness through acceptance and understanding of difference to overcome cultural unconsciousness. Such development has the capacity to destabilise invisible borders embedding lasting change in the consciousness of Australian readers and provide a foundational and fundamental step toward sustainable outcomes for Indigenous people.' (Publication summary)
y 'Splendid Failures' : The Wanderer in Patrick White's Voss (1957) and Randolph Stow's To the Islands (1958) ; and, The September Sisters Kathleen Steele , Sydney : 2014 8268786 2014 single work thesis

'The first part of this thesis studies the gendering effects of the literary wanderer in Voss and To the islands. The second part, "The September Sisters" is a novel set in Australia with a female Wanderer and her sister as its central protagonists.' (Trove)

Splendid Masculinity : The Wanderer in Voss and To the Islands Kathleen Steele , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 5 2014;

'Critics have suggested that the publication of Patrick White’s Voss (1957) and Randolph Stow’s To the Islands (1958) within a year of each other signalled both a search for truth, and a questioning of cultural norms. Critical discourse has largely centred on the main characters (Voss and Heriot) and their movement within, and relationship to, an omnipresent landscape. I propose, however, to consider the influence of European literary traditions on depictions of gender in Voss and To the Islands.

'It is my contention that in modelling their main characters on the literary figure of the Wanderer, White and Stow amplify traditional masculine ideals. This is due to the intrinsic connection between the Wanderer and melancholy, the sublime and genius. These tropes have been masculinised to such an extent that the values and beliefs they encompass quite often pass unacknowledged by the reader. Foregrounding the powerful connections binding the Wanderer and masculinity will therefore, facilitate a reading of gender in Voss and To the Islands that has until now been overlooked.' (Publication abstract)

'Are You For Magic?' Patrick White and Camp Peter Kirkpatrick , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , November vol. 29 no. 4 2014; (p. 1-18)
It's Absurd that Our Best Books Are Not Made into Films Peter Craven , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 21 January 2013; (p. 11)
Literary Guide to Australia Nicholas Shakespeare , 2013 single work column
— Appears in: The Telegraph , 10 July 2013;
'We asked some of the world's most eminent writers to offer literary tours of the places they know best.'
The Young Leichhardt's Diaries in the Context of His Australian Cultural Legacy Angus Nicholls , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Leichhardt Papers : Reflections on His Life and Legacy , June vol. 7 no. 2 2013; (p. 541-560)

'This paper examines Ludwig Leichhardt's early Australian diaries, spanning from April 1842 until July 1844, in relation to his cultural legacy. Although Leichhardt's standing as an explorer was initially established following the success of his journey to Port Essington in 1844-46, his reputation in Australia was later damaged by controversies arising from rival accounts of both this first journey and particularly of the second expedition of 1846-47. These controversies, at times informed by anti-Prussian and later by anti-German prejudices, have dominated Leichhardt's reception in Australia, while at the same time diverting attention from his German cultural background and the ways in which it may have influenced his writings on Australia. Leichhardt's education took place within the contexts of the late German Enlightenment, of philosophical idealism and of romanticism, and key elements of those interrelated movements can be detected in his early Australian diaries. It is, moreover, clear that Leichhardt saw his letters and diaries as contribution not only to the natural sciences, but also to the genre of romantic travel literature, exemplified by his idol Alexander von Humboldt, among others. This in turn raises the possibility that Leichhardt's own romantic modes of expression may have influenced his most culturally resonant alter-ego in the canon of Australian literature, the eponymous protagonist of Patrick White's novel Voss (1957). ' (541)

Patrick White and the American Middlebrow : Book-of-the-Month Chooses Voss Roger Osborne , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 188-194)
Leichhardt after Leichhardt Andrew W. Hurley , Katrina Schlunke , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Studies , vol. 37 no. 4 2013; (p. 537-543)

In this essay, the authors review 'a selection of the more influential writings about Leichhardt to demonstrate both the enduring

interest in his life and the vastly different perspectives held in the texts.' (537)

Untitled Peter Boxall , 2006 single work review
— Appears in: 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die 2006; (p. 509)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
The Books That Made Us 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 19-20 August 1995; (p. rev 1-2)

— Review of My Brother Jack : A Novel George Johnston 1964 single work novel ; The Lucky Country Donald Horne 1964 single work non-fiction ; Joe Wilson and His Mates Henry Lawson 1901 selected work short story ; My Brilliant Career Miles Franklin 1901 single work novel ; Monkey Grip Helen Garner 1977 single work novel ; Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel ; The Fortunes of Richard Mahony Henry Handel Richardson 1917 single work novel
Novelists and Conventions Vincent Buckley , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: Prospect , June vol. [1] no. 1 1958; (p. 21-22)

— Review of Seedtime Vance Palmer 1957 single work novel ; Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
'Seedtime' and 'Voss' Marjorie Barnard , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin , Autumn vol. 17 no. 1 1958; (p. 94-100)

— Review of Seedtime Vance Palmer 1957 single work novel ; Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Untitled 1957 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 13 December 1957; (p. 753)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Patrick White's Nightmare 1958 single work review
— Appears in: The Observer , 22 February no. 1 1958; (p. 19-20)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Patrick White's Significant Journey H. J. Oliver , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 19 no. 1 1958; (p. 46-49)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
The Big Boss Voss Douglas Stewart , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 5 March vol. 79 no. 4073 1958; (p. 2,58)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
The Parable of Voss Ian Turner , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 12 1958; (p. 36-37)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Voss Robert Fry , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Letters , April vol. 1 no. 3 1958; (p. 40-41)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Untitled Graham Hough , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: Encounter , vol. 10 no. 2 1958; (p. 86-7)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Untitled Kylie Tennant , 1958 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 8 February 1958; (p. 12)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Untitled Rodney Mather , 1963 single work review
— Appears in: The Melbourne Critical Review , no. 6 1963; (p. 93-101)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Untitled D. J. O'Hearn , 1980 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 September 1980; (p. 25)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Poetic Symbolism in Novel by Patrick White Kylie Tennant , 1990 single work review
— Appears in: Critical Essays on Patrick White 1990; (p. 50-52)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Untitled The Vulture , 1995 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Magazine , 22-23 July 1995; (p. 9)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Second Thoughts Peter Craven , 1997 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 30 March 1997; (p. 6)

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
Show Me the Way to Go Home Thomas Keneally , 2002 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian , 16 November 2002;

— Review of Voss : A Novel Patrick White 1957 single work novel
In this look back at Patrick White's Voss, Kenneally states that White was 'a genius, and Voss one of the finest works of the modernist era and of the past century.' He also suggests that 'Revisiting Voss now, one can see why even in Australia and among readers, White might not be read as much as his work merits. In the 1990s I "taught" Voss to a graduate seminar at New York University. One of the students who had been to Australia said, "What's eating this guy? I've been to Sydney and it's heaven on a stick!" She, and young Australians of her generation, no longer see Australia as an enormous, dangerous vacancy that can consume the pilgrim.'
The Marriage of the Mind and the Cosmos in Patrick White's Voss : An Indian Perspective K. Chellappan , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Literary Criterion , vol. 37 no. 2 2002; (p. 44-53)
Inner Struggles Thomas Keneally , 2002-2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 17 December-14 January vol. 120 no. 6355 2002-2003; (p. 38-39)
Paradoxes of Non- Existence : Questions of Time, Metaphor and the Materialities of Cultural Traditions in Wilson Harris's Discussions of Australian Literary Texts Brigitta Olubas , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Cultural History , no. 21 2002; (p. 81-88, notes 122)
Olubas examines the way in which Caribbean writer Wilson Harris's 'account of national traditions and of the national and cultural provenances and imaginitive inheritances of particular writers directs attention ... toward broader, unexpected imaginitive, aesthetic and representational traditions, explicitly colonial, often violent, which yet enhance our readings of the complex high points of national literary traditions and figures ... [and] presents us with other ways to take up the relations between texts, within as well as across (national) cultural traditions' (p. 88).
Containing Continents: The Moralized Landscapes of Conrad, Greene, White and Harris Mark Williams , 1985 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 7 no. 1 1985; (p. 34-45)
y Postcolonial Literature from Three Continents : Tutuola, H. D., Ellison, and White Judith L. Tabron , New York (City) : Peter Lang , 2003 Z1061297 2003 multi chapter work criticism Publisher's abstract: 'How can we read literatures from other cultures? The metaphors of fractal geometry can help us think about the complexity of the cultural situation of a text or an author. Postcolonial Literature from Three Continents identifies four primary themes common to postcolonial texts - technology, memory, language, and geography - and examines them in relationship to four texts from Nigeria, the United States, and Australia so that we see both the colonized and colonizing positions of these works. The quartet of texts are Amos Tutola's The Palm-Wine Drinkard, H. D.'s Helen in Egypt , Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, and Patrick White's Voss.'
Imagery and Structure in Patrick White's Novels Karin Hansson , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Breaking Circles 1991; (p. 175-181)
White, Geography, and Voss Judith L. Tabron , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Literature from Three Continents : Tutuola, H. D., Ellison, and White 2003; (p. 169-212)
Text and Meaning : A Deconstructive Analysis of Patrick White's Voss Deb Narayan Bandyopadhyay , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 124-130)
Indomitable Spirit of Nature in Patrick White's Voss V. C. Sudheer , 1995-1996 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Commonwealth Review , vol. 7 no. 1 1995-1996; (p. 131-133)
Translating Patrick White's Novels Voss and The Vivisector into Greek Vrasidas Karalis , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 63 no. 1 2003; (p. 133-141)
Will Voss Endure? : Fifty Years Later John Beston , 2003 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 17 no. 1 2003; (p. 50-54)
Nearly 50 years after the publication of Voss, Beston comments on 'the greatness of the novel and the qualities that alienate the reader from it.' He notes that in Voss White is really attempting to put Australia on the 'cultural map'; 'it is the cultural exploration that engages White's heart and mind.' Beston notes that the significant changes in Australian culture that occurred in the latter part of the twentieth century have changed the way in which Voss is received and understood by a new generation of readers.
Patrick White: An International Perspective John Colmer , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Breaking Circles 1991; (p. 182-196)
The Evolving Literature of Australian Exploration Paul Genoni , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Subverting the Empire : Explorers and Exploration in Australian Fiction 2004; (p. 71-96)
Dead White Male Heroes : Ludwig Leichhardt and Ned Kelly in Australian Fictions Susan K. Martin , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Imagining Australia : Literature and Culture in the New New World 2004; (p. 23-52)
y Geschichte erzahlen: Untersuchungen zur Behandlung von Geschichte und nationaler Identitat in australischer Gegenwartsliteratur Henrike Wenzel , Munster : Lit Verlag , 2003 Z1172475 2003 single work criticism
Why Has This Hollywood Director Taken 25 Years to Adapt a Classic Australian Novel? Mike Safe , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 23-24 April 2005; (p. 26-31)
Traces the decades-long saga of turning White's novel Voss into a film. American director Stuart Cooper plans to begin filming Voss in Australia in 2006.
The Obstinacy of the Sacred Andrew McCann , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , December vol. 19 no. 2 2005; (p. 152-157)
Examines contemporary Australian literature with the view that 'the sacred is at once a powerful symptom of postcolonial disquiet and a path of flight that promises to lead beyond this, and beyond history itself'. (p. 157)
Some Comments on the Style of The Fortunes of Richard Mahony and Voss 黄源深 , 1995 single work criticism
— Appears in: A Unique Literature : A Critical View of Australian Literary Works 1995; (p. 163-175)
Patrick White and Rimbaud John Beston , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Commonwealth , Spring vol. 27 no. 2 2005; (p. 99-110)
'Patrick White acknowledged that he was "soaked in Rimbaud". Five poems in his novels are linked to Rimbaud. Their main themes are ones important also in Rimbaud's poems: the need to escape a constrictive mother by fleeing into the freedom of the imagination, followed by a fear of that very freedom. ... Ultimately both writers yielded in defeat to the stronger figure of their mother. After a final tribute to his mother, White turned to other subjects; Rimbaud abandoned poetry altogether' (99).
Reading Literatures in English without Theory Robert L. Ross , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Critics and Writers Speak : Revisioning Post-Colonial Studies 2006; (p. 48-55)
In his introduction, Ross writes, 'reading Voss changed my life' (48). Ross's study of White's fiction led him to read other Australian literature and to his becoming an 'Australian specialist,' who helped establish the North American journal Antipodes. His article asks a number of questions regarding the application of post-colonial theory to recent novels from post-colonial nations.
Last amended 3 Dec 2015 10:36:27
X