One Summer Sunday single work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1971 1971
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Overland no. 49 Spring 1971 Z604975 1971 periodical issue 1971 pg. 11-13
  • Appears in:
    y Sandgropers : A Western Australian Anthology Dorothy Hewett (editor), Perth : UWA Publishing , 1973 Z312077 1973 anthology criticism poetry short story This work consists of a variety of poetry, fiction and critical articles about themes that engage writers in Western Australia. Perth : UWA Publishing , 1973 pg. 27-32
  • Appears in:
    y I'm Still Here Aren't I? : short stories Iris Milutinovic , Lenah Valley : Shearwater Press , 1985 Z362712 1985 selected work short story Lenah Valley : Shearwater Press , 1985 pg. 13-17

Works about this Work

Girl in a White Dress : The Voices of Iris Milutinovic Cheryl Markosky , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 27 no. 1 2013; (p. 43-48)
'Machosky talks about the writings of Iris Milutinovic. In her writing, Milutinovic spoke in many voices, speaking for others but with an honest effort to speak truly. Most notably, she spoke in the voice of the unassimilated immigrant in her one published novel, but also significantly in the voice of an Aboriginal woman, revised and revisited, and above all, she spoke in her own voice, as a woman struggling to survive, to write, to be heard.' (Editor's abstract)
Girl in a White Dress : The Voices of Iris Milutinovic Cheryl Markosky , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 27 no. 1 2013; (p. 43-48)
'Machosky talks about the writings of Iris Milutinovic. In her writing, Milutinovic spoke in many voices, speaking for others but with an honest effort to speak truly. Most notably, she spoke in the voice of the unassimilated immigrant in her one published novel, but also significantly in the voice of an Aboriginal woman, revised and revisited, and above all, she spoke in her own voice, as a woman struggling to survive, to write, to be heard.' (Editor's abstract)
Last amended 15 May 2001 14:44:50
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