Group from Tartarus single work   poetry   "A woman ripe with life, whose hand"
Issue Details: First known date: 1960... 1960 Group from Tartarus
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

  • Appears in:
    y Salient vol. 1 no. 4 1960 Z614960 1960 periodical issue 1960 pg. 9
  • Appears in:
    y Southerly vol. 21 no. 1 1961 Z587831 1961 periodical issue 1961 pg. 46
  • Appears in:
    y Poems [Volume 1] Gwen Harwood , Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1963 Z421270 1963 selected work poetry Sydney : Angus and Robertson , 1963 pg. 78-79
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems [1975] Gwen Harwood , Sydney London : Angus and Robertson , 1975 Z420751 1975 selected work poetry This collection contains a selection from Poems and Poems : Volume Two as well as 27 new poems. Sydney London : Angus and Robertson , 1975 pg. 38
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Verse from 1805 : A Continuum Geoffrey Dutton (editor), Adelaide : Rigby , 1976 Z399014 1976 anthology Adelaide : Rigby , 1976 pg. 238-239
  • Appears in:
    y The Illustrated Treasury of Australian Verse Beatrice Davis , Melbourne : Nelson , 1984 Z315151 1984 anthology poetry biography Melbourne : Nelson , 1984 pg. 201
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems [1985] Gwen Harwood , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1985 Z443272 1985 selected work poetry A revision of Selected Poems, first published by Angus and Robertson in 1975. It incorporates poems from The Lion's Bride, 1981. North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1985 pg. 38
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems [1990] Gwen Harwood , North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 Z313285 1990 selected work poetry North Ryde : Angus and Robertson , 1990 pg. 41-42
  • Appears in:
    y The Illustrated Treasury of Australian Verse Beatrice Davis , Melbourne : Nelson , 1984 Z315151 1984 anthology poetry biography Sydney : State Library of New South Wales Press , 1996 pg. 201
  • Appears in:
    y Selected Poems : A New Edition Gwen Harwood , Gregory Kratzmann (editor), Victor Harbor : Halcyon Press , 2001 Z824188 2001 selected work poetry Details of the changes made in compiling this selection are outlined in the editor's introduction . Some poems not appearing in previous selections, as well as some unpublished poems, have been added; some poems previously appearing have been omitted. Textual emendations have been made to some works. Victor Harbor : Halcyon Press , 2001 pg. 39

Works about this Work

The Professors Alison Hoddinott , single work criticism biography
'Having Fun with the Professors' : Gwen Harwood and Doctor Eisenbart Ann-Marie Priest , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 32 no. 1 2017;

'This essay examines the role of Gwen Harwood’s Eisenbart poems in helping to establish her career as a serious poet. It argues that Harwood had more trouble breaking into the male-dominated world of Australian poetry than is generally acknowledged, and that the Eisenbart poems, which centre on a fictional scientist, represent a turning point in her literary fortunes. In the 1950s, Harwood struggled to get the kind of attention she sought from a number of influential poetry editors and reviewers, many of whom were also academics. Chief among them for her were A. D. Hope, Vincent Buckley and James McAuley. Her Eisenbart poems, which both play up to and satirise the cultural icon of the god-professor, were an attempt to subvert expectations of so-called ‘lady poets’ and beat the ‘professors’ at their own game. They also gave literary expression to the debate between positivism and humanism that dominated some aspects of academic life in the 1950s, and to the anger and frustration Harwood experienced at repeated rejections of her work.'

Source: Abstract.

The Professors Alison Hoddinott , single work criticism biography
'Having Fun with the Professors' : Gwen Harwood and Doctor Eisenbart Ann-Marie Priest , 2017 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , February vol. 32 no. 1 2017;

'This essay examines the role of Gwen Harwood’s Eisenbart poems in helping to establish her career as a serious poet. It argues that Harwood had more trouble breaking into the male-dominated world of Australian poetry than is generally acknowledged, and that the Eisenbart poems, which centre on a fictional scientist, represent a turning point in her literary fortunes. In the 1950s, Harwood struggled to get the kind of attention she sought from a number of influential poetry editors and reviewers, many of whom were also academics. Chief among them for her were A. D. Hope, Vincent Buckley and James McAuley. Her Eisenbart poems, which both play up to and satirise the cultural icon of the god-professor, were an attempt to subvert expectations of so-called ‘lady poets’ and beat the ‘professors’ at their own game. They also gave literary expression to the debate between positivism and humanism that dominated some aspects of academic life in the 1950s, and to the anger and frustration Harwood experienced at repeated rejections of her work.'

Source: Abstract.

Last amended 21 Sep 2013 16:51:02
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