The Dream by the Fountain single work   poetry   "Thought-weary and sad, I reclined by a Fountain"
  • Author: Charles Harpur http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/harpur-charles
Composed: Jerrys Plains, Jerrys Plains - Warkworth - Mount Thorley area, Singleton area, Hunter Valley, Newcastle - Hunter Valley area, New South Wales,
Issue Details: First known date: 1843 1843
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Notes

  • Compostion place and date appear at foot of poem in the version published in the Australasian Chronicle (10 June, 1843): 4.
  • This poem appears in a number of versions from 1843 onwards. For further details, see The Poems of Charles Harpur in Manuscript in the Mitchell Library and in Publication in the Nineteenth Century: An Analytical Finding List by Elizabeth Holt and Elizabeth Perkins (Canberra: Australian Scholarly Editions Centre, 2002).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
72 lines.
Notes:
92 lines.

Works about this Work

The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Charles Harpur's Disfiguring Origins : Allegory in Colonial Poetry Philip Mead , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 14 no. 3 1990; (p. 279-296) Imagining Romanticism : Essays on English and Australian Romanticisms 1992; (p. 217-240)
Mead examines the poetry of Charles Harpur in terms of the poet's attempt to move from colonial to national modes of expression. Mead proceeds by exploring the allegorical nature of some poems as signs of Harpur's attempt to exhibit the original Australian voice to which he aspired. But, allegoresis, Mead suggests, opposes the poet's romanticising of origins because of the gap between the signs of expression and the experience of the poet. What is found when one seeks "origins" in Harpur's poetry is not a "unitary or easily traceable historical origin" but the "divisions and anxieties" of Harpur's allegory.
In the First Place : Charles Harpur and the Fate of Poetry Philip Mead , 1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Age Monthly Review , May 1986; (p. 7-9)
Charles Harpur for a New Generation Michael Ackland , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , June vol. 28 no. 6 1984; (p. 65-71)
Charles Harpur's Disfiguring Origins : Allegory in Colonial Poetry Philip Mead , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 14 no. 3 1990; (p. 279-296) Imagining Romanticism : Essays on English and Australian Romanticisms 1992; (p. 217-240)
Mead examines the poetry of Charles Harpur in terms of the poet's attempt to move from colonial to national modes of expression. Mead proceeds by exploring the allegorical nature of some poems as signs of Harpur's attempt to exhibit the original Australian voice to which he aspired. But, allegoresis, Mead suggests, opposes the poet's romanticising of origins because of the gap between the signs of expression and the experience of the poet. What is found when one seeks "origins" in Harpur's poetry is not a "unitary or easily traceable historical origin" but the "divisions and anxieties" of Harpur's allegory.
Charles Harpur for a New Generation Michael Ackland , 1984 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , June vol. 28 no. 6 1984; (p. 65-71)
In the First Place : Charles Harpur and the Fate of Poetry Philip Mead , 1986 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Age Monthly Review , May 1986; (p. 7-9)
The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 20 Dec 2011 13:05:03
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