y A Sydney-Side Saxon single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1888 1888
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Notes

  • Other formats: Also e-book.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

First known date: 1888
Serialised by: The Centennial Magazine 1888 periodical (27 issues)
Notes:
Serialised in the Centennial Magazine in September 1888 - January 1889.

Works about this Work

Excavating the Borders of Literary Anglo-Saxonism in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Australia Chris Jones , Louise D'Arcens , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Representations , Winter vol. 121 no. 1 2013; (p. 85-106)

'Comparing nineteenth-century British and Australian Anglo-Saxonist literature enables a “decentered” exploration of Anglo-Saxonism’s intersections with national, imperial, and colonial discourses, challenging assumptions that this discourse was an uncritical vehicle of English nationalism and British manifest destiny. Far from reflecting a stable imperial center, evocations of “ancient Englishness” in British literature were polyvalent and self-contesting, while in Australian literature they offered a response to colonization and emerging knowledge about the vast age of Indigenous Australian cultures.' (Authors abstract)

Jack Lindsay, Patrick White, and Postcolonial Medievalism Nicholas Birns , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 41-54)
Inverse Invasions : Medievalism and Colonialism in Rolf Boldrewood's 'A Sydney-Side Saxon' Louise D'Arcens , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Parergon , Summer vol. 22 no. 2 2005; (p. 159-182)
'Rolf Boldrewood's forgotten 1894 novel, A Sydney-Side Saxon, merits reexamination as a fascinating nineteenth-century medievalist vision of Australian national identity. The novel's vision of pastoral Australia depends on idiosyncratic notions of Saxon and Norman ethnicity derived from Scott's Ivanhoe. While Scott's portrait of post-conquest England dramatizes the ethnic and political conflict between Norman conquerors and subjected Saxons, Boldrewood consistently presents Norman and Saxons as two complementary sides of an English 'type' that is perfectly fitted to achieve the colonial settlement of Australia. Boldrewood's racialized vision of England's medieval past informs not only his novel's celebration of colonial meritocracy in Australia, but also its apologia for colonial violence and indigenous dispossession. As in Ivanhoe, however, the dispossessed Others of Boldrewood's novel continue to haunt the margins of its narrative.' - Author's abstract
Untitled 1925 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 26 May vol. 1 no. 27 1925; (p. 24, 45)

— Review of A Sydney-Side Saxon Rolf Boldrewood 1888 single work novel ; Colin's Story Book Leigh Bell 1924 single work children's fiction
Rolf Boldrewood F. M. , 1904 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 1 December vol. 25 no. 1294 1904; (p. 2)
Untitled 1892 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Quarterly Magazine , December 1892; (p. 337)

— Review of A Sydney-Side Saxon Rolf Boldrewood 1888 single work novel
A Pioneer Sketch F. J. D. , 1891 single work column review
— Appears in: The Sydney Mail , 14 November vol. 52 no. 1636 1891; (p. 1086)
Untitled 1891 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian , 25 August 1891; (p. 7)

— Review of A Sydney-Side Saxon Rolf Boldrewood 1888 single work novel
Untitled 1925 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Woman's Mirror , 26 May vol. 1 no. 27 1925; (p. 24, 45)

— Review of A Sydney-Side Saxon Rolf Boldrewood 1888 single work novel ; Colin's Story Book Leigh Bell 1924 single work children's fiction
Untitled 1892 single work review
— Appears in: Sydney Quarterly Magazine , December 1892; (p. 337)

— Review of A Sydney-Side Saxon Rolf Boldrewood 1888 single work novel
Untitled 1891 single work review
— Appears in: The Guardian , 25 August 1891; (p. 7)

— Review of A Sydney-Side Saxon Rolf Boldrewood 1888 single work novel
A Pioneer Sketch F. J. D. , 1891 single work column review
— Appears in: The Sydney Mail , 14 November vol. 52 no. 1636 1891; (p. 1086)
Inverse Invasions : Medievalism and Colonialism in Rolf Boldrewood's 'A Sydney-Side Saxon' Louise D'Arcens , 2005 single work criticism
— Appears in: Parergon , Summer vol. 22 no. 2 2005; (p. 159-182)
'Rolf Boldrewood's forgotten 1894 novel, A Sydney-Side Saxon, merits reexamination as a fascinating nineteenth-century medievalist vision of Australian national identity. The novel's vision of pastoral Australia depends on idiosyncratic notions of Saxon and Norman ethnicity derived from Scott's Ivanhoe. While Scott's portrait of post-conquest England dramatizes the ethnic and political conflict between Norman conquerors and subjected Saxons, Boldrewood consistently presents Norman and Saxons as two complementary sides of an English 'type' that is perfectly fitted to achieve the colonial settlement of Australia. Boldrewood's racialized vision of England's medieval past informs not only his novel's celebration of colonial meritocracy in Australia, but also its apologia for colonial violence and indigenous dispossession. As in Ivanhoe, however, the dispossessed Others of Boldrewood's novel continue to haunt the margins of its narrative.' - Author's abstract
Jack Lindsay, Patrick White, and Postcolonial Medievalism Nicholas Birns , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 41-54)
Rolf Boldrewood F. M. , 1904 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 1 December vol. 25 no. 1294 1904; (p. 2)
Excavating the Borders of Literary Anglo-Saxonism in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Australia Chris Jones , Louise D'Arcens , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Representations , Winter vol. 121 no. 1 2013; (p. 85-106)

'Comparing nineteenth-century British and Australian Anglo-Saxonist literature enables a “decentered” exploration of Anglo-Saxonism’s intersections with national, imperial, and colonial discourses, challenging assumptions that this discourse was an uncritical vehicle of English nationalism and British manifest destiny. Far from reflecting a stable imperial center, evocations of “ancient Englishness” in British literature were polyvalent and self-contesting, while in Australian literature they offered a response to colonization and emerging knowledge about the vast age of Indigenous Australian cultures.' (Authors abstract)

Last amended 22 Apr 2015 15:14:32
Subjects:
  • New South Wales,
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