5584023315390168581.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y The Well single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1986 1986
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'Miss Hester Harper, middle-aged and eccentric, brings Katherine into her emotionally impoverished life. Together they sew, cook gourmet dishes for two, run the farm, make music and throw dirty dishes down the well. One night, driving along the deserted track that leads to the farm, they run into a mysterious creature. They heave the body from the roo bar and dump it into the farm's deep well. But the voice of the injured intruder will not be stilled and, most disturbing of all, the closer Katherine is drawn to the edge of the well, the farther away she gets from Hester.' (From the publisher's website.)

Adaptations

form y The Well Laura Jones , Australia : Southern Star Xanadu , 1997 Z817969 1997 single work film/TV fantasy (taught in 3 units)

Katherine works on an isolated farm run by Hester and Hester's father Francis. Unhappy because of her heavy workload, Katherine wants to leave. Hester doesn't want her to go, because she is attracted to her younger friend. She manages to convince Katherine to stay by promising to give her less work in the future. When old Francis dies, Hester sells the farm for cash, and she and Katherine move to a small cottage on the farm's edge, from where they plan a trip to Europe. A tragic accident and the theft of their money changes their plans.

Notes

  • Sound recordings, braille versions and video recording available.

    A film adaptation of this novel was released in 1997, from a script by Laura Jones, directed by Samantha Lang and featuring Pamela Rabe and Miranda Otto.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Viking , 1986 .
      Extent: 176p.
      ISBN: 0670811033
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1987 .
      Extent: 176p.
      Reprinted: 1988
      ISBN: 0140267662 (pbk.)
    • New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Penguin , 1987 .
      Extent: 176p.
      Note/s:
      • King Penguin
      ISBN: 0140089012
    • Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 1997 .
      Extent: 176p.
      ISBN: 0140267662
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2007 .
      Extent: 252p.
      ISBN: 9780143180012
      Series: Penguin Modern Classics series - publisher
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2009 .
      5584023315390168581.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Extent: 252p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 29 June 2009.
      ISBN: 9780143202769
      Series: y Popular Penguins Penguin (publisher), Camberwell : Penguin , 2008- Z1605341 2008 series - publisher novel essay short story
Alternative title: El poso
Language: Spanish

Works about this Work

Mute Eloquence : Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well as Encrypted Melodrama Monique Rooney , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 15 no. 1 2015;
'Drawing on Derrida’s reading of the crypt as both secret place and no place (Fors, 1986), and on Catherine Malabou’s work on the plasticity of form, this essay argues that buried in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well (1986) is a Pygmalion-esque melodrama about animated stones and the turning to stone of the animated. This essay shows how the novel’s juxtapositions of song and speech place it in a musical-dramatic tradition that, reaching back to antiquity, has crossed spatio-temporal borders and metamorphosed in migration through various media, genres and modalities (including theatre and novel). Like the words carved on the palm of a hand, The Well’s melodrama is partly buried within its written form. Melodrama is, in this Australian story, an encrypted imaginary that nevertheless animates the novel’s fascination with terrestrial death and sub-terrestrial life and its depiction of a human will to closure or burial that exists alongside a will to expose, transfer, transform and renew.' (Publication abstract)
Elizabeth Jolley's Life Experience's Influence on Her Literary Creation Zhang Geping , 2015 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies – Proceedings of the 14th International Conference of Australian Studies in China 2015; (p. 98-101)
'Elisabeth Jolley is an internationally famous Australian woman writer. At the age of fifty three, Jolley published her first novel. Her novel The Well won Miles Franklin Prize which was the highest literary award in Australia. Jolley's literary creation and her life experience are inseparable. Her life is full of ups and downs; her bumpy life promotes her literary creation, and her literary career is full of countless obstacles and setbacks. In spite of all these, she reaches her peak of literary creation after she overcomes the insurmountable hardships. Jolley conquers obstacles in life and grows into an internationally well-known writer. This paper intends to explore Jolley's life experience and its influence on her literary creation. The study of her life experience and its influences on her literary creation is of great significance to in-depth interpretation of Joney's literary works.' (98)
Down in Elizabeth Jolley's The Well : An Essay on Repression M. Pilar Baines Alarcos , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Language, Literature & Culture , vol. 61 no. 1 2014; (p. 46-59)
'Female writers traditionally have found in the Gothic a useful weapon for criticising patriarchal ideologies and the constrictions they force upon women. This is the project undertaken by The Well, whose main character is a woman who usually challenges social norms in many ways and finds herself crippled, both physically and metaphorically, by the conservative Australian community in which she lives. The mysterious content of the well next to her cottage invites various interpretations. It acquires a richer meaning from a psychological perspective since it turns out to be the distorted reflection of the two female protagonists' psyche. It functions as a projected unconscious, a container of individual and collective memories, repressed fears, and desires. In the constant battle for power that takes place in the novel, the well becomes a site of female struggle against patriarchal authority. Above all it represents the main character's repressed sexuality, in a story wherein feminine sexuality significantly evokes the abject, and offers her the chance to come to terms with it.' (Author's abstract)
The Watertight Sieve Ellena Savage , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: The Lifted Brow , no. 16 2013; (p. 44-45)
The Phantom and Transgenerational Trauma in Elizabeth Jolley’s 'The Well' M. Dolores Herrero , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 201-216)
'Elizabeth Jolley's The Well, one of the most celebrated examples of the Australian female Gothic, can also be studied as a trauma novel. Set in the vast and dry postcolonial Australian countryside, the novel deals with the intense, traumatic, and somehow bordering on the homo-erotic, relationship between elderly and embittered Hester Harper, heiress to a large agricultural estate, and young and unformed Katherine, a sixteen-year-old orphan whom Hester unofficially adopted one day...' (From author's introduction 201)
A Century of Oz Lit in China : A Critical Overview (1906-2008) Yu Ouyang , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 65-71)
‘This paper seeks to examine the dissemination, reception and perception of Australian literature in China from 1906 to 2008 by providng a historical background for its first arrival in China as a literature undistinguished from English or American literature, then as part of a ruoxiao minzu wenxue (weak and small nation literature) in the early 1930s, its rise as interest grew in Communist and proletarian writings in the 1950s and 1960s, and its spread and growth from the end of the cultural revolution in 1976 across all genres, culminating in its present unprecedented flourishing.’ (Introduction, p. 65)
“[P]eople Often Judged by What They Feared or Knew Existed in Themselves” : A Postcolonial Critique of Disability in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well Kate Ellis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 203-218)
Friendship in a Time of Loneliness Barbara Milech , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 97-110)
The essay 'explores the ways in which Jolley's fictions are simultaneously motivated by a longing for consummate love - (hetero)sexual, intellectual, spiritual, all at once - and shaped by a gathering understanding of the impossibility of that desire as a way of being in the world' (98-99).
Jolley's Women Bronwen Levy , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 111-120)
The essay about Jolley's women 'looks at the ways in which Jolley represents women's longing for other women; it argues that this longing is central to her representation of female characters and the feminine condition. Jolley's literary style, her writing method, makes this question of longing and desire both complex and ambiguous' (112).
The Gothic and Sexuality : Marian Engel's Bear and Elizabeth Jolley's The Well Gerry Turcotte , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Peripheral Fear : Transformations of the Gothic in Canadian and Australian Fiction 2009; (p. 181-201)
Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well : Fathoming Postcolonial Depths in the Female Gothic Cornelis Martin Renes , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 2009;

'As a sample of the Australian female Gothic, critical discussion of Elizabeth Jolley's The Well (1986) has centrally focused on issues of gender, but not considered its racial inscription. This lack is especially relevant when criticism, despite praising the author's experimentation with narrative technique and genre, tends to voice dissatisfaction with the novel's conclusion in medias res, which never solves the tension between a presumed return to the patriarchal norm and the voicing of liberating alternatives.

After reviewing issues of genre, gender and class, this paper proposes a postcolonial perspective so as to come to terms with this dilemma, and argues that the text signals the impossibility of suppressing the Native from the contemporary Australian land and textscape, whose Gothic articulation in the uncanny shape of the male well-dweller haunts the novel's engagement with female empowerment. The female protagonist may only start overcoming a crippling gender discourse in the White postcolonial pastoralist setting by inscribing herself into 'Australianness'.

Reconciling her body with the land is significantly staged in terms of an Aboriginal cosmogony, as it is a 'walkabout' that allows Hester to start controlling her body and story. Thus, The Well may be understood to be inconclusive because it struggles to map gender across race at a time of Aboriginal-exclusive multiculturalism. Written in the mid 1980s, it announces a point of inflection in thinking about native-nonnative relationships which would soon lead to attempts at 'Reconciliation' by mainstream Australia.' (Author's abstract)

Echoes of a Not so Mythical Past : Memories of Race in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well Cornelis Martin Renes , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 3 2009; (p. 116-122)

'Critical discussion of Elizabeth Jolley's The Well (1986) has largely focused on issues of gender, but little has been said about the racial inscription of the novel. This lack is especially relevant when criticism, despite praising the author's experimentation with narrative technique and genre, tends to voice dissatisfaction with the novel's conclusion in medias res, which never solves the tension between a presumed return to the patriarchal norm and the voicing of liberating alternatives.

This paper proposes a postcolonial perspective so as to come to terms with this dilemma, and argues that the text signals the impossibility of suppressing the Native from the contemporary Australian land and textscape, whose Gothic articulation in the uncanny shape of the male well-dweller haunts the novel's engagement with female empowerment. The female protagonist may only start overcoming a crippling gender discourse in the White postcolonial pastoralist setting by inscribing herself into 'Australianness'. Reconciling her body with the land is significantly staged in terms of an Aboriginal cosmogony, as it is a 'walkabout' that allows Hester to start controlling her body and story. Thus, The Well may be understood to be inconclusive because it struggles to map gender across race at a time of Aboriginal-exclusive multiculturalism. Written in the mid 1980s, it announces a point of inflection in thinking about nativenonnative relationships which would soon lead to attempts at "Reconciliation" by mainstream Australia.' Source: Cornelis Martin Renes.

Local Classics Belle Taylor , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 12 September 2009; (p. 12)

— Review of Cloudstreet Tim Winton 1991 single work novel ; Sixty Lights Gail Jones 2004 single work novel ; Gilgamesh : A Novel Joan London 2001 single work novel ; The Shark Net : Memories and Murder Robert Drewe 2000 single work autobiography ; A Fortunate Life A. B. Facey 1980 single work autobiography ; The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel ; The Merry-Go-Round in the Sea Randolph Stow 1965 single work novel
Treasured Memories Katharine England , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Advertiser The , 8 December 2007; (p. 11)
Deep, Dark and Divine Phil Brown , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 1 - 2 December 2007; (p. 29)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Quick at Meals, Quick at Work Elizabeth Jolley , 2006 single work prose
— Appears in: Learning to Dance : Elizabeth Jolley : Her Life and Work 2006; (p. 271-278)
A Scattered Catalogue of Consolation Elizabeth Jolley , 2006 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Learning to Dance : Elizabeth Jolley : Her Life and Work 2006; (p. 17-53)
'As One Whom His Mother Comforteth, So Will I Comfort You : Elizabeth Jolley's Catalogue of Consolation Elaine Lindsay , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 66 no. 1 2006; (p. 52-65)
Babies Eat Their Lace: Elizabeth Jolley and the Slaughter of Decorum Eden Liddelow , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: After Electra : Rage, Grief and Hope in Twentieth-Century Fiction 2002; (p. 118-136, notes 194-195)
Elizabeth Jolley's "The Well" and the Female Gothic Amanda Nettelbeck , 1999 single work criticism
— Appears in: Extensions : Essays in English Studies from Shakespeare to the Spice Girls 1999; (p. 89-99)
Untitled Judith Rodriguez , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Fremantle Arts Review , December vol. 1 no. 12 1986; (p. 14-15)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Untitled Daphne Glazer , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Margin , no. 18 1987; (p. 20-21)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Plumbing the Depths of Darkness Sue Hosking , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: The CRNLE Reviews Journal , no. 2 1987-1988; (p. 68-71)

— Review of In the Winter Dark Tim Winton 1988 single work novel ; The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Deep, Dark and Divine Phil Brown , 2007 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 1 - 2 December 2007; (p. 29)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Dotty and Disorderly Conduct Robert Coover , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The New York Times Book Review , 16 November 1986; (p. 44-45)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel ; Woman in a Lampshade Elizabeth Jolley 1983 selected work short story
Local Classics Belle Taylor , 2009 single work review
— Appears in: The West Australian , 12 September 2009; (p. 12)

— Review of Cloudstreet Tim Winton 1991 single work novel ; Sixty Lights Gail Jones 2004 single work novel ; Gilgamesh : A Novel Joan London 2001 single work novel ; The Shark Net : Memories and Murder Robert Drewe 2000 single work autobiography ; A Fortunate Life A. B. Facey 1980 single work autobiography ; The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel ; The Merry-Go-Round in the Sea Randolph Stow 1965 single work novel
Humor, Poignancy, and Intrigue : The Fiction of Elizabeth Jolley Suzanne Scott , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: Belles-Lettres (US) , July-August 1988; (p. 3)

— Review of The Newspaper of Claremont Street : A Novel Elizabeth Jolley 1981 single work novel ; The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel ; Woman in a Lampshade Elizabeth Jolley 1983 selected work short story
Gazing at the Ripples Jean Bedford , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Sunday Times [Perth] , 8 October 1986;

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Dark Secret Lurks Deep in the Well Katharine England , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , September 1986; (p. 21)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Intrusive Echoes Patricia Craig , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 15 August 1986; (p. 894)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Jolley: Ambiguous, Surreal, Powerful Marion Halligan , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 29 November 1986; (p. B2)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Many Levels in the Fantasy World of Hester Harper Drusilla Modjeska , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13 September 1986; (p. 44)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
The Realms of Gold : Fictions, Fantasies, Self-Fashioning Stephanie Trigg , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , November no. 86 1986; (p. 5-6)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Untitled 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Library Journal , 1 October no. 91 1986; (p. 110)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Untitled 1986 single work review
— Appears in: Publisher's Weekly , 26 September no. 230 1986; (p. 67)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Trafficking Between Fantasy and Horror Helen Daniel , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 27 September 1986; (p. 12)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Untitled Geoffrey Dutton , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian Magazine , 20-21 September 1986; (p. 15)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
A Message from Our Flying Domestic Susan McKernan , 1986 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 18 November vol. 108 no. 5545 1986; (p. 101)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Untitled Janet E. Lorenz , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Magill's Literary Annual 1987; (p. 958-962)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Untitled Shirley J. Paolini , 1987 single work review
— Appears in: Antipodes , November vol. 1 no. 2 1987; (p. 117)

— Review of The Well Elizabeth Jolley 1986 single work novel
Babies Eat Their Lace: Elizabeth Jolley and the Slaughter of Decorum Eden Liddelow , 2002 single work criticism
— Appears in: After Electra : Rage, Grief and Hope in Twentieth-Century Fiction 2002; (p. 118-136, notes 194-195)
Quick at Meals, Quick at Work Elizabeth Jolley , 2006 single work prose
— Appears in: Learning to Dance : Elizabeth Jolley : Her Life and Work 2006; (p. 271-278)
A Scattered Catalogue of Consolation Elizabeth Jolley , 2006 single work autobiography
— Appears in: Learning to Dance : Elizabeth Jolley : Her Life and Work 2006; (p. 17-53)
'As One Whom His Mother Comforteth, So Will I Comfort You : Elizabeth Jolley's Catalogue of Consolation Elaine Lindsay , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 66 no. 1 2006; (p. 52-65)
Treasured Memories Katharine England , 2007 single work column
— Appears in: Advertiser The , 8 December 2007; (p. 11)
The Incestuous Father in the Well : An Hysterical Narrative Sue Gillett , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Journal of Australian Lesbian Feminist Studies , December vol. 1 no. 2 1991; (p. 69-79)
Friendship in a Time of Loneliness Barbara Milech , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 97-110)
The essay 'explores the ways in which Jolley's fictions are simultaneously motivated by a longing for consummate love - (hetero)sexual, intellectual, spiritual, all at once - and shaped by a gathering understanding of the impossibility of that desire as a way of being in the world' (98-99).
Jolley's Women Bronwen Levy , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , vol. 24 no. 1 2009; (p. 111-120)
The essay about Jolley's women 'looks at the ways in which Jolley represents women's longing for other women; it argues that this longing is central to her representation of female characters and the feminine condition. Jolley's literary style, her writing method, makes this question of longing and desire both complex and ambiguous' (112).
The Gothic and Sexuality : Marian Engel's Bear and Elizabeth Jolley's The Well Gerry Turcotte , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Peripheral Fear : Transformations of the Gothic in Canadian and Australian Fiction 2009; (p. 181-201)
“[P]eople Often Judged by What They Feared or Knew Existed in Themselves” : A Postcolonial Critique of Disability in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well Kate Ellis , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Postcolonial Issues in Australian Literature 2010; (p. 203-218)
Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well : Fathoming Postcolonial Depths in the Female Gothic Cornelis Martin Renes , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Studies , vol. 1 no. 1 2009;

'As a sample of the Australian female Gothic, critical discussion of Elizabeth Jolley's The Well (1986) has centrally focused on issues of gender, but not considered its racial inscription. This lack is especially relevant when criticism, despite praising the author's experimentation with narrative technique and genre, tends to voice dissatisfaction with the novel's conclusion in medias res, which never solves the tension between a presumed return to the patriarchal norm and the voicing of liberating alternatives.

After reviewing issues of genre, gender and class, this paper proposes a postcolonial perspective so as to come to terms with this dilemma, and argues that the text signals the impossibility of suppressing the Native from the contemporary Australian land and textscape, whose Gothic articulation in the uncanny shape of the male well-dweller haunts the novel's engagement with female empowerment. The female protagonist may only start overcoming a crippling gender discourse in the White postcolonial pastoralist setting by inscribing herself into 'Australianness'.

Reconciling her body with the land is significantly staged in terms of an Aboriginal cosmogony, as it is a 'walkabout' that allows Hester to start controlling her body and story. Thus, The Well may be understood to be inconclusive because it struggles to map gender across race at a time of Aboriginal-exclusive multiculturalism. Written in the mid 1980s, it announces a point of inflection in thinking about native-nonnative relationships which would soon lead to attempts at 'Reconciliation' by mainstream Australia.' (Author's abstract)

A Century of Oz Lit in China : A Critical Overview (1906-2008) Yu Ouyang , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 65-71)
‘This paper seeks to examine the dissemination, reception and perception of Australian literature in China from 1906 to 2008 by providng a historical background for its first arrival in China as a literature undistinguished from English or American literature, then as part of a ruoxiao minzu wenxue (weak and small nation literature) in the early 1930s, its rise as interest grew in Communist and proletarian writings in the 1950s and 1960s, and its spread and growth from the end of the cultural revolution in 1976 across all genres, culminating in its present unprecedented flourishing.’ (Introduction, p. 65)
Echoes of a Not so Mythical Past : Memories of Race in Elizabeth Jolley’s The Well Cornelis Martin Renes , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 3 2009; (p. 116-122)

'Critical discussion of Elizabeth Jolley's The Well (1986) has largely focused on issues of gender, but little has been said about the racial inscription of the novel. This lack is especially relevant when criticism, despite praising the author's experimentation with narrative technique and genre, tends to voice dissatisfaction with the novel's conclusion in medias res, which never solves the tension between a presumed return to the patriarchal norm and the voicing of liberating alternatives.

This paper proposes a postcolonial perspective so as to come to terms with this dilemma, and argues that the text signals the impossibility of suppressing the Native from the contemporary Australian land and textscape, whose Gothic articulation in the uncanny shape of the male well-dweller haunts the novel's engagement with female empowerment. The female protagonist may only start overcoming a crippling gender discourse in the White postcolonial pastoralist setting by inscribing herself into 'Australianness'. Reconciling her body with the land is significantly staged in terms of an Aboriginal cosmogony, as it is a 'walkabout' that allows Hester to start controlling her body and story. Thus, The Well may be understood to be inconclusive because it struggles to map gender across race at a time of Aboriginal-exclusive multiculturalism. Written in the mid 1980s, it announces a point of inflection in thinking about nativenonnative relationships which would soon lead to attempts at "Reconciliation" by mainstream Australia.' Source: Cornelis Martin Renes.

The Phantom and Transgenerational Trauma in Elizabeth Jolley’s 'The Well' M. Dolores Herrero , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 201-216)
'Elizabeth Jolley's The Well, one of the most celebrated examples of the Australian female Gothic, can also be studied as a trauma novel. Set in the vast and dry postcolonial Australian countryside, the novel deals with the intense, traumatic, and somehow bordering on the homo-erotic, relationship between elderly and embittered Hester Harper, heiress to a large agricultural estate, and young and unformed Katherine, a sixteen-year-old orphan whom Hester unofficially adopted one day...' (From author's introduction 201)
The Watertight Sieve Ellena Savage , 2013 single work essay
— Appears in: The Lifted Brow , no. 16 2013; (p. 44-45)
This Self the Honey of All Beings - A Conversation with Elizabeth Jolley Paul Kavanagh (interviewer), Peter Kuch (interviewer), 1989 single work interview
— Appears in: Southerly , September vol. 49 no. 3 1989; (p. 438-451) Conversations : Interviews with Australian Writers 1991; (p. 153-176)
An Interview with Elizabeth Jolley Ulla Joussen (interviewer), 1993 single work interview biography
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 15 no. 2 1993; (p. 37-43)
Voices in the Well: Elizabeth Jolley and Radclyffe Hall Adrienne Kertzer , 1992 single work criticism
— Appears in: World Literature Written in English , vol. 32, no2-33, no.1 no. 1992-1993; (p. 122-132)
Light Shines in the Darkness Leta Keens , 1997 single work criticism
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 29 July vol. 116 no. 6082 1997; (p. 69-70)
Jolley Loves Screen View of The Well Carolyn Martin , 1997 single work column biography
— Appears in: The West Australian , 5 August 1997; (p. 4)
Last amended 28 Oct 2015 08:13:05
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