y Captain Cub single work   novel   young adult  
Is part of The Cub Ethel Turner 1915-1919 series - author novel (number 2 in series)
Issue Details: First known date: 1917 1917
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AbstractHistoryArchive Description

'The Cub goes to Gallipoli and speedily wins promotion, being the youngest captain in the forces. The life there is well depicted, and so is the great evacuation. The main theme of the book, however, is the love story of the Cub and Brigid, which is charming and idyllic, and entirely unlike the modern style'.

Source:

'Captain Cub' [review], The World's News, 3 November 1917, p.29. (Via Trove Australia)

Notes

  • 'All things uncomely and broken, all things worn and old, / The cry of a child by the roadway, the creak of a lumbering cart...' -- Yeats.
  • According to contemporary reviews, the novel was originally serialised in The Daily Telegraph.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1917 .
      Extent: 255 p., [6] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Melbourne, Victoria,: Ward, Lock , 1922 .
      Extent: 255 p., [6] leaves of platesp.
      Description: illus.
Alternative title: Kapten Cub
Language: Swedish
    • Stockholm,
      c
      Sweden,
      c
      Scandinavia, Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Fahlcrantz , 1918 .
      Extent: 157p.

Works about this Work

“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
y Ethel Turner and the 'Voices of Dissent' : Masculinities and Fatherhood in The Cub and Captain Cub Claudia Nelson , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z1040837 2003 single work criticism
Attitudes to War in Australian Children's Literature Anne M. O'Sullivan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 5 no. 1 1994; (p. 34-48)
O'Sullivan seeks to 'identify attitudes to war in Australian children's literature' in the period 1914-1994, noting in particular the movement from identification with Britain and the Empire in the early decades of this period to an affinity with Asia and the Pacific in the latter decades (34). The discussion begins with a literature review of Australian and overseas critical research in this field and then surveys a large number of (mainly Australian) novels with war as the central/pivotal theme. O'Sullivan concludes that there has been a change in attitudes to war in Australian children's literature, whereby 'once Australia was part of the British Empire and prepared to fight for that anywhere in the world, now multicultural Australia takes a broader view and sees herself as part of a global family' (47).
Writing the Home : The Literary Careers of Ethel Turner and L. M. Montgomery Brenda Niall , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 175-180)
Niall discusses the literary careers of Australian writer Ethel Turner and Canadian writer L. M. Montgomery with attention to how, as contemporaries, their experiences often paralleled one another. She argues that Turner revolutionized Australian children's literature by bringing 'the action indoors and show[ing] that suburban Australia could be at least as interesting as the outback' (175). As Niall points out 'traditionally, Australian writers have concerned themselves with the city or the bush; there is very little representation of small town communities or closely settled farming districts' (178-179). Up until the 1960s there was very little development of novels that celebrate regionalism and Niall cites Colin Thiele's The Sun on the Stubble as 'perhaps the best example of an emerging regional tradition' (179). While Montgomery's recurring motif was 'the orphan's search for a home', Turner's novels often centred on the struggle of an individual or family 'with poverty or a father's tyranny as the source of conflict' (178), and featured independent and resourceful heroines who often had to choose between 'a career as a writer or artist and marriage and motherhood' (176).
Captain Cub 1917 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 24 October 1917; (p. 11)

— Review of Captain Cub Ethel Turner 1917 single work novel
Captain Cub 1917 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian Town and Country Journal , 24 October 1917; (p. 11)

— Review of Captain Cub Ethel Turner 1917 single work novel
y Ethel Turner and the 'Voices of Dissent' : Masculinities and Fatherhood in The Cub and Captain Cub Claudia Nelson , St Lucia : AustLit: The Australian Literature Resource , 2009 Z1040837 2003 single work criticism
Writing the Home : The Literary Careers of Ethel Turner and L. M. Montgomery Brenda Niall , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Children's Literature Association Quarterly , vol. 15 no. 4 1990; (p. 175-180)
Niall discusses the literary careers of Australian writer Ethel Turner and Canadian writer L. M. Montgomery with attention to how, as contemporaries, their experiences often paralleled one another. She argues that Turner revolutionized Australian children's literature by bringing 'the action indoors and show[ing] that suburban Australia could be at least as interesting as the outback' (175). As Niall points out 'traditionally, Australian writers have concerned themselves with the city or the bush; there is very little representation of small town communities or closely settled farming districts' (178-179). Up until the 1960s there was very little development of novels that celebrate regionalism and Niall cites Colin Thiele's The Sun on the Stubble as 'perhaps the best example of an emerging regional tradition' (179). While Montgomery's recurring motif was 'the orphan's search for a home', Turner's novels often centred on the struggle of an individual or family 'with poverty or a father's tyranny as the source of conflict' (178), and featured independent and resourceful heroines who often had to choose between 'a career as a writer or artist and marriage and motherhood' (176).
Attitudes to War in Australian Children's Literature Anne M. O'Sullivan , 1994 single work criticism
— Appears in: Papers : Explorations into Children's Literature , April vol. 5 no. 1 1994; (p. 34-48)
O'Sullivan seeks to 'identify attitudes to war in Australian children's literature' in the period 1914-1994, noting in particular the movement from identification with Britain and the Empire in the early decades of this period to an affinity with Asia and the Pacific in the latter decades (34). The discussion begins with a literature review of Australian and overseas critical research in this field and then surveys a large number of (mainly Australian) novels with war as the central/pivotal theme. O'Sullivan concludes that there has been a change in attitudes to war in Australian children's literature, whereby 'once Australia was part of the British Empire and prepared to fight for that anywhere in the world, now multicultural Australia takes a broader view and sees herself as part of a global family' (47).
“Whichever and Whatever It Was” : Rendering War and Peace in Australian WWI Narratives Clare Rhoden , 2016 single work essay
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;
'Australian narratives of World War I (WWI) reflect a different but characteristic commemoration of that event. While the best (to modern eyes) novels of WWI present a comprehensive picture of disillusionment, futility and waste, Australian stories proffer the view that the war was worthwhile, and that the sacrifices of the Anzacs were honourable and justified. In placing WWI as a salient marker denoting the origin of the nation, Australian texts diverge from the revered WWI canon’s convincing portrayal of the war as a symbol of civilisation’s demise. Even accepting this divergence, however, there is much in Australian narratives that amplifies the memorialisation of the war in Australian society.' (Introduction)
Last amended 2 Jul 2014 11:32:21
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