5227831214915210251.jpg
Image courtesy of publisher's website.
y Poor Fellow My Country single work   novel  
Issue Details: First known date: 1975 1975
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Notes

  • Available in braille and as a sound recording.

Affiliation Notes

  • Associated with the AustLit subset Australian Literary Responses to 'Asia' as the work contains Chinese characters.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Fontana , 1975 .
      Extent: 1463p.
      Limited edition info: First printed in September 1975 in an edition of 14,000 copies of which 150 numbered and signed copies were bound in leather.
      Reprinted: 1975 , 1983 , 1976 , 1977 , 1985
      ISBN: 0006160298
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins , 1975 .
      Extent: 1463p.
      ISBN: 0006144705 (pbk), 0002115888
      • Publisher: Pan
      London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Pan , 1977 .
      Extent: 1463p.
      ISBN: 033025233X
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins , 1980 .
      Extent: 1463p.
      ISBN: 0002222183 (dustjacket)
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Collins , 1988 .
      Extent: 1463p.
      ISBN: 0732200350
    • Sydney South, South Sydney area, Sydney Southern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: HarperCollins , 2014 .
      5227831214915210251.jpg
      Image courtesy of publisher's website.
      Note/s:
      • Available as an electronic resource
      ISBN: 9781460703243
Alternative title: Kawaiso Na Watakushi No Kuni
Language: Japanese

Works about this Work

The Godfather : Peter Corris on The Seven Pillars of Wisdom Peter Corris , 2016 single work column
— Appears in: The Newtown Review of Books , May 2016;
Reissues Kate Livett , 2016 single work review
— Appears in: Long Paddock , vol. 73 no. 3 2016;

— Review of Miss Peabody's Inheritance Elizabeth Jolley 1983 single work novel ; A Descant for Gossips Thea Astley 1960 single work novel ; Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel ; Journey to Horseshoe Bend T. G. H. Strehlow 1969 single work biography
Tracking Our Country in Settler Literature Jeanine Leane , 2014 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , vol. 14 no. 3 2014;
'This is a narrative paper that tracks a story of Aboriginal representation and the concept of nation across the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries through some important Australian texts. I read this assemblage of settler literature through the cultural metaphor of tracking, because tracking is as much about anticipation as it is following. Tracking is about reading: reading land and people before and after whitefellas. It is about entering into the consciousness of the person or people of interest. Tracking is not just about reading the physical signs; it is about reading the mind. It is not just about seeing and hearing what is there; it is as much about what is not there. Tony Morrisson wrote of mapping ‘the critical geography’ (3) of the white literary imagination in her work on Africanist presence in American Literature, Playing in the Dark. This paper tracks the settler imagination on Aboriginal presence in Australian literature in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. ' (Author's introduction)
His Country Geordie Williamson , 2014 single work review
— Appears in: The Weekend Australian , 29-30 November 2014; (p. 16-17)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
'Xavier Herbert’s immense, intense, ambitious, flawed novel still retains its bite, writes Geordie Williamson.'
Jerramungup Dreaming : Ethel Hassell's My Dusky Friends is Finally Published Kim Scott , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 336-342)
Sir Zelman and the Literary Looney Laurie Hergenhan , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , June vol. 56 no. 6 2012; (p. 70-73)
The Materialization and Transformation of Xavier Herbert : A Body of Work Committed to Australia Russell McDougall , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Engaging with Literature of Commitment : The Worldly Scholar (Volume 2) 2012; (p. 187-200)
‘When the Australian novelist Xavier Herbert applied for a War Service Pension in 1975, the Western Australian authorities were unable to verify his existence. The Deputy Commissioner requested that he supply his birth certificate. ‘Of course I do not have one,’ he responded, ‘have never had one.’ He had been born, he said, at a time and a place when records often were not kept, a frontier space where established social conventions had given way to makeshift. He had been told that he was born on 15 May 1901, and had always operated on that assumption, until now being informed that he had no official existence at all.’ (Author’s introduction 187)
The Contemporary State of Academic Appraisal of Australian Literature in Japanese Universities Yasue Arimitsu , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 7-13)
Yasue Arimitsu investigates 'the state of literature in Japan, and how Australian literature was introduced to Japan, how it is now being taught at universities, and the state of academic appraisal of Australian literature in Japanese universities' and 'what learning about Australian literature means to Japanese people'. (p. 7)
Rearranging the Dead Cat Bruce Pascoe , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 2 2011; (p. 14-23)
Biopolitical Correspondences : Settler Nationalism, Thanatopolitics, and the Perils of Hybridity Michael R. Griffiths , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , June vol. 26 no. 2 2011; (p. 20-42)
'How does (post)colonial literary culture, so often annexed to nationalist concerns, interface with what Michel Foucalt called biopolitics? Biopolitics can be defined as the regularisation of a population according to the perceived insistence on norms. Indeed, biopolitics is crucially concerned with what is perceptible at the macroscopic level of an entire population - often rendering its operations blind to more singular, small, identitarian, or even communitarian representations and imaginaries. Unlike the diffuse, microscopic, governmental mechanisms of surveillance that identify the need for disciplinary interventions, biopolitics concerns itself with the regularisation of societies on a large scale, notably through demography. As Ann Laura Stoler has put it, Foucault's identification of these two forms of power, 'the disciplining of individual bodies...and the regularization of life processes of aggregate human populations' has led to much productive work in the postcolonialist critique of 'the discursive management of the sexual practices of the colonized', and the resultant 'colonial order of things' (4).' (Author's introduction, 20)
Indigenous or Exotic? Trees in Australian Cinema Chris Mann , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Studies in the Tropics , no. 10 2011; (p. 141-152)
'This article examines trees in three Australian films to assess if they are seen from a white point of view or an Indigenous point of view.' (Author's abstract)
Imagining Darwin Kate Smith , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Northern Territory Literary Awards 2011 2011; (p. 77-84)
Untitled Brenda Eldridge , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Voice : A Journal of Comment and Review , September no. 35 2010; (p. 33-35)
The Road to Poor Fellow My Country Laurie Hergenhan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Found in Fryer : Stories from the Fryer Library Collection 2010; (p. 158-159)
Reconfiguring 'Asian Australian' Writing : Australia, India and Inez Baranay Paul Sharrad , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 11-29)
A Nation So Ill-Begotten: Racialized Childhood Belonging in Xavier Herbert's Poor Fellow My Country and Baz Luhrmann's Australia Liz Conor , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 4 no. 2 2010; (p. 97-113)
Xavier Herbert's classic Australian novels Poor Fellow My Country (1975) and Capricornia (1938) are acknowledged as directly influencing Baz Lurhmann's film Australia. Aboriginal children have a particular significance in white imaginings of a distinctly Australian race destiny. Moreover, the creamy Aboriginal child has become a redemptive emblem of reconciliation in cultural imaginings. This article revisits Herbert's Aboriginal child character, Prindy, in Poor Fellow My Country, to assess Herbert's nationalist ambitions and how they were embodied by the mixed-descent child in his work. It situates this aspiration within an acquisitive impulse towards racialized children that characterized British colonialism, and that re-appears in Luhrmann's Australia.
Australia : Echoes of Xavier Herbert Laurie Hergenhan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , March vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 16-18)
The article discusses the film "Australia" in relation to the Australian fiction "Capricornia" and "Poor Fellow My Country" by Xavier Herbert. It compares the contrasting motifs of the movie and the novels. The author outlines the characters in the novels and explores how aspects of these characters are similarly played out in the movie. Overviews of the movie and the novels are also given.
Behind the Scenes with Xavier Herbert Laurie Hergenhan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 195 2009; (p. 100-106)
In reminiscing about his relationship with Xavier Herbert and the role he played during the writing process of Herbert's novel Poor Fellow My Country, Laurie Hergenhan provides a portrait of Herbert more sympathetic than Herbert's usual reputation suggests, taking into consideration his complexities and talents and fostering a revaluation of his work.
'At-Home' Two-Ways : Negotiating the Sacred in the Pastoral Zone Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 165-204)
'Stories of the Old Country' : Reinventing Dreamtime Tropes in 'Poor Fellow My Country', 'Benang', and 'Carpentaria' Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 205-241)
Defeated by Verbosity Ross Campbell , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 4 October vol. 97 no. 4977 1975; (p. 46-47)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Brian Elliott , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: The Advertiser , 13 September 1975; (p. 20)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled T. Hepworth , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: Nation Review , 17-23 October 1975; (p. 23)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Harry Payne Heseltine , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: The Australian , 13 September 1975; (p. 41)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Xavier Herbert's Magnum Opus Harry Payne Heseltine , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: Meanjin Quarterly , Winter vol. 34 no. 2 1975; (p. 133-136)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Flawed Achievement Edward Kynaston , 1975 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , Spring no. 62 1975; (p. 76-78)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Epic of Capricorn (reprint) Randolph Stow , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 2-7 August 1976; (p. 28-29)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Epic of Capricorn Randolph Stow , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Times Literary Supplement , 9 April 1976; (p. 417)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Manning Clark , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Canberra Times , 12 September 1976; (p. 10)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled George Farwell , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13 September 1976; (p. 15)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Carl Harrison-Ford , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Sydney Morning Herald , 13 September 1976; (p. 15)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled L. V. Kepert , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Sun-Herald , 14 September 1976; (p. 114)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Brian Kiernan , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Age , 13 September 1976; (p. 19)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Humphrey McQueen , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: Arena , no. 41 1976; (p. 79-81)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled David Rowbotham , 1976 single work review
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 13 September 1976; (p. 17)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Artur Lundkvist , 1977 single work review
— Appears in: Dagens Nyheter (Stockholm) , 7 February 1977;

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Vague Vision and Savage Substance D. R. Burns , 1988 single work review
— Appears in: Overland , December no. 113 1988; (p. 45-51)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled John McLaren , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Good Reading Guide 1989; (p. 112)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled William Noonan , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Good Reading Guide 1989; (p. 112-113)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
Untitled Clement Semmler , 1989 single work review
— Appears in: The Good Reading Guide 1989; (p. 113)

— Review of Poor Fellow My Country Xavier Herbert 1975 single work novel
y A Long and Winding Road : Xavier Herbert's Literary Journey Sean Monahan , Nedlands : UWA Publishing , 2003 Z1041133 2003 single work criticism
y The Novels of Xavier Herbert Sean Monahan , Nedlands : University of Western Australia , 2001 Z1048898 2001 single work thesis
Politics and Xavier Herbert's Women Kevin Green , 1983 single work criticism
— Appears in: Kunapipi , vol. 5 no. 1 1983; (p. 51-62)
Tale End 5.8.03 Stewart Rose , 2003 single work correspondence
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 12 August vol. 121 no. 6385 2003; (p. 6)
An Evening with Xavier Herbert Xavier Herbert , 1976 single work autobiography
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 5 no. 1 1976; (p. 1-6)
An Artist Lived Here Des Houghton , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 16 -17 April 2005; (p. 26)
Some Whites Are Whiter Than Others: The Whitefella Skin Politics of Xavier Herbert and Cecil Cook Fiona Probyn , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , Special Issue 2007; (p. 157-173)
Fiona Probyn-Rapsey investigates reports that Dr Cecil Cook, Chief Medical Officer and Chief Protector of Aborigines from 1927 to 1939 in the Northern Territory, was an albino. Her research leads her to conclude 'that Cook's "albinism" is possibly a fiction of Herbert's or it is an association built upon an image of extreme or excessive whiteness that inhabits Herbert's fiction, politics and letters. While the attribution of albinism to Cook's body is, I believe, a misreading, it is also instructive and revealing, because it inadvertently capitalises on (or makes literal or corporeal) Herbert's interests in securing Australia for a certain kind of whiteness - one that did not lack "colour', by which is meant, more accurately, indigeneity.
The Eco-Centric Self and the Sacred in Xavier Herbert's Poor Fellow My Country Frances Devlin-Glass , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: JASAL , no. 8 2008; (p. 45-63) Sacred Australia : Post-Secular Considerations 2009; (p. 166-187)
'Herbert's Poor Fellow My Country (1975) anticipated edgy twenty-first century national conversations about race relations and ecology currently occurring in Australia in the disciplines of history and historiography, anthropology, eco-philosophy, and literature. Set in the remote pastoral frontier of the Northern Territory in the 1930s and 1940s, the novel anatomises the genocidal practices of an encyclopaedic range of Australian institutions (political movements of the left and right, the squattocracy, the church, the law, the education and 'welfare' bureaucracies) and satirises the 'Aboriginal industry's' systematic ignorance and denigration of Aboriginal culture. The novel promotes a new kind of nationalism which incorporates Indigenous citizenry as active players. Despite its manifest flaws, its ideological hyperbole and intense pessimism, and perhaps because of its extraordinarily expansive canvas (it is longer than War and Peace) and its formal experimentation, the novelist's level of familiarity with Aboriginal culture, and his humanity are remarkable and prescient, especially in the light of current dysfunctionality in Aboriginal communities that have been systematically robbed of cultural pride. This paper looks behind Herbert's satire (tub-thumpery?) to his radical views on what Aboriginal culture and in particular its mythological understandings of land have to offer to the "common-wealth". The novel will be read in the light of contemporary post-colonially-inflected and Indigenous-centred oral history, mythology, and Australian eco-philosophy.' (Author's abstract)
Australia : Echoes of Xavier Herbert Laurie Hergenhan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Quadrant , March vol. 53 no. 3 2009; (p. 16-18)
The article discusses the film "Australia" in relation to the Australian fiction "Capricornia" and "Poor Fellow My Country" by Xavier Herbert. It compares the contrasting motifs of the movie and the novels. The author outlines the characters in the novels and explores how aspects of these characters are similarly played out in the movie. Overviews of the movie and the novels are also given.
Behind the Scenes with Xavier Herbert Laurie Hergenhan , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Overland , Winter no. 195 2009; (p. 100-106)
In reminiscing about his relationship with Xavier Herbert and the role he played during the writing process of Herbert's novel Poor Fellow My Country, Laurie Hergenhan provides a portrait of Herbert more sympathetic than Herbert's usual reputation suggests, taking into consideration his complexities and talents and fostering a revaluation of his work.
Tropic Days : Literature and Art of North Queensland Peter Pierce , 2004 single work criticism
— Appears in: Etropic : Electronic Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies in the Tropics , vol. 3 no. 1 2004;
"The notion of 'tropic days' conjures images of warmth and idleness, of reverie, of the flight from the cares and cold of the south, or the north, depending from where you are coming. In Tales from the Torrid Zone: Travels in the Deep Tropics, the English writer Alexander Frater defined le coup de bamboo, 'a mild form of tropic madness for which, luckily, there is no cure'. The tropics are the latitudes of escape - from work, from domestic responsibility. The ersatz myth-making of travel brochures emphasises these temporary possibilities. Yet the writers and painters whose lives we have mentioned found that North Queensland was the region where they could work most productively. They escaped, but into creative exertion, as much as from irksome calls on their time. Doing so, they spent their tropics days in ways that have enormously enriched Australian culture, its literature and art in particular."
'At-Home' Two-Ways : Negotiating the Sacred in the Pastoral Zone Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 165-204)
'Stories of the Old Country' : Reinventing Dreamtime Tropes in 'Poor Fellow My Country', 'Benang', and 'Carpentaria' Bill Ashcroft , Frances Devlin-Glass , Lyn McCredden , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Intimate Horizons : The Post-Colonial Sacred in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 205-241)
Untitled Brenda Eldridge , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Voice : A Journal of Comment and Review , September no. 35 2010; (p. 33-35)
The Road to Poor Fellow My Country Laurie Hergenhan , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Found in Fryer : Stories from the Fryer Library Collection 2010; (p. 158-159)
Reconfiguring 'Asian Australian' Writing : Australia, India and Inez Baranay Paul Sharrad , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 70 no. 3 2010; (p. 11-29)
The Wide Brown Land : Literary Readings of Space and the Australian Continent Anthony J. Hassall , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australia : Making Space Meaningful 2007; (p. 45-53)
'In his 1987 poem "Louvres" Les Murray speaks of journeys to 'the three quarters of our continent/set aside for mystic poetry" (2002, 239), a very different reading of Australia's inner space to A.D. Hope's 1939 vision of it as '[t]he Arabian desert of the human mind" (1966, 13) In this paper I review the opposed, contradictory ways in which the inner space of Australia has been perceived by Australian writers, and note changes in those literary perceptions, especially in the last fifty years. In that time what was routinely categerised, by Patrick White among others, as the "Dead heart" (1974, 94) - the disappointing desert encountered by nineteenth=century European explorers looking for another America -has been re-mythologised as the "Red Centre," the symbolic, living heart of the continent. What Barcroft Boake's 1897 poem hauntingly portrayed as out where the dead men lie" (140,-2) is now more commonly imagined as a site of spiritual exploration and psychic renewal, a place where Aboriginal identification with the land is respected and even shared. This change was powerfully symbolised in 1985 by the return to the traditional Anangu owners of the title deeds to the renamed Uluru, the great stone sited at the centre of the continent; but while this re-mythologising has been increasingly influential in literary readings, older, more negative constructions of that space as hostile and sterile have persisted, so that contradictory attitudes towards the inner space of Australia continue to be expressed. In reviewing a selection of those readings, I am conscious that they both distort and influence broader cultural perceptions. I am also aware that literary reconstructions of the past reflect both the attitudes of the time depicted and the current attitudes of the writer, and that separating the two is seldom simple. Finally, I am conscious of the connections between literary readings and those in art and film of the kind documented by Roslynn Hanes in her 1998 study Seeking the Centre: the Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film, and those in television and advertising. I have however, with the exception of the Postscript, limited my paper to literary readings, with an emphasis on works published since Haynes's study.' (Author's abstract p. 45)
The Contemporary State of Academic Appraisal of Australian Literature in Japanese Universities Yasue Arimitsu , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Antipodes , June vol. 25 no. 1 2011; (p. 7-13)
Yasue Arimitsu investigates 'the state of literature in Japan, and how Australian literature was introduced to Japan, how it is now being taught at universities, and the state of academic appraisal of Australian literature in Japanese universities' and 'what learning about Australian literature means to Japanese people'. (p. 7)
A Nation So Ill-Begotten: Racialized Childhood Belonging in Xavier Herbert's Poor Fellow My Country and Baz Luhrmann's Australia Liz Conor , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australasian Cinema , vol. 4 no. 2 2010; (p. 97-113)
Xavier Herbert's classic Australian novels Poor Fellow My Country (1975) and Capricornia (1938) are acknowledged as directly influencing Baz Lurhmann's film Australia. Aboriginal children have a particular significance in white imaginings of a distinctly Australian race destiny. Moreover, the creamy Aboriginal child has become a redemptive emblem of reconciliation in cultural imaginings. This article revisits Herbert's Aboriginal child character, Prindy, in Poor Fellow My Country, to assess Herbert's nationalist ambitions and how they were embodied by the mixed-descent child in his work. It situates this aspiration within an acquisitive impulse towards racialized children that characterized British colonialism, and that re-appears in Luhrmann's Australia.
Rearranging the Dead Cat Bruce Pascoe , 2011 single work essay
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 71 no. 2 2011; (p. 14-23)
Last amended 1 Dec 2014 16:37:46
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