Outrider single work   poetry   "My mare turns back her ears"
Issue Details: First known date: 1962 1962
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Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Works about this Work

The Islands of Randolph Stow Fiona Richards , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 3 2012; (p. 103-118)

'Randolph Stow (1935-2010) prefaced his novel To the Islands with this quotation [see epigraph below] drawn from the writings of his great great uncle. Coming from an island that is also a continent, where 'arguably, 'island-ness' was and still is at the core of the Australian worldview' (Davies and Neuenfeldt, 2004: 137), the notion of 'island', sometimes imaginary, sometimes having a geographical precision, is manifest in Stow's writings in many different ways. An aura of mystery pervades all of his novels, the sea is often present, and there are recurring themes of isolation and boundedness.' (Author's introduction)

Grievous Music : Randolph Stow's Middle Ages Melanie Duckworth , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October - November vol. 26 no. 3-4 2011; (p. 102-114)
Mal du Pays: Symbolic Geography in the Work of Randolph Stow Martin Leer , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 15 no. 1 1991; (p. 3-25)
Grievous Music : Randolph Stow's Middle Ages Melanie Duckworth , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , October - November vol. 26 no. 3-4 2011; (p. 102-114)
Mal du Pays: Symbolic Geography in the Work of Randolph Stow Martin Leer , 1991 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Literary Studies , May vol. 15 no. 1 1991; (p. 3-25)
The Islands of Randolph Stow Fiona Richards , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , vol. 72 no. 3 2012; (p. 103-118)

'Randolph Stow (1935-2010) prefaced his novel To the Islands with this quotation [see epigraph below] drawn from the writings of his great great uncle. Coming from an island that is also a continent, where 'arguably, 'island-ness' was and still is at the core of the Australian worldview' (Davies and Neuenfeldt, 2004: 137), the notion of 'island', sometimes imaginary, sometimes having a geographical precision, is manifest in Stow's writings in many different ways. An aura of mystery pervades all of his novels, the sea is often present, and there are recurring themes of isolation and boundedness.' (Author's introduction)

Last amended 24 Aug 2012 15:27:14
Subjects:
  • c
    United Kingdom (UK),
    c
    Western Europe, Europe,
  • c
    Australia,
    c
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