y Pacific Tales selected work   short story  
Issue Details: First known date: 1897 1897
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Notes

  • A collection of stories, the majority of which are about Europeans in the North and South Pacific in the nineteenth century. Several of the stories appear to be directly based on Becke's own experiences.

Contents

* Contents derived from the London,
c
England,
c
c
United Kingdom (UK),
c
Western Europe, Europe,
:
T. Fisher Unwin , 1897 version. Please note that other versions/publications may contain different contents. See the Publication Details.
An Island Memory : English Bob, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
Tom Denison tells a story of his days on Strong's Island after the wreck of 'Bully' Hayes's ship, the Leonora. Denison left Hayes's camp and was taken in by a local family. He relates the story of a fight between English Bob, and Englishman married to a local girl, and an American sailor, as told to him by English Bob's daughter.
(p. 3 - 16)
In the Old, Beach-Combing Days, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
Charles Wendall, a sailor, has lived amongst the Islanders for forty years. He is alarmed when a group of American missionaries, accompanied by an Islander convert, arrives on the island but the island chief, Togusa, has heard of missionaries and their work and turns them away. The missionaries depart, but they leave behind a deadly legacy.
(p. 19 - 41)
Mrs Malleson's Rival, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A trader, separated from his wife because of her involvement with the suffragette movement, lives alone on Tarawa, an island of Kiribati, with his beloved pig, Brian. His wife writes to him and asks him to come home, but he cannot bear to leave Brian.
(p. 43 - 61)
Prescott of Naura, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
Prescott, an escaped convict, commits an atrocity against a group of sailors and other escapees when they refuse to join him in an act of piracy. His actions lead to his exile from Naura and he is forced to wander the Pacific trying to escape his reputation.
(p. 65 - 86)
Chester's 'Cross', Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A young woman seeks to be reunited with her former love, now a trader in the Caroline Islands, but he has reasons for refusing to reply to her letters. Their love seems doomed, until a cyclone intervenes.
(p. 89 - 112)
Hollis's Debt : A Tale of the North-West Pacific, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A beachcomber seeks revenge against a ship's captain who had him unfairly flogged and then abandoned him.
(p. 115 - 125)
The Arm of Luno Capal, Louis Becke , 1895 single work short story
A young man is determined to collect pearl shell from an isolated part of New Britain, despite the warnings of more experienced traders. He pays a terrible price for not heeding their counsel.
(p. 129 - 139)
In a Samoan Village, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A ship's captain devises a scheme to try and capture two sailors who had deserted their ships and are living on a Samoan island. The men manage to escape and are not heard of again for many years.
(p. 143 - 157)
Collier : 'The Blackbirder' : A Tale of the South Pacific Labour Trade, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A ship's mate relates his experience when a group of Pacific Islanders, who are being taken to Tahiti to work on a sugar plantation, take over the ship.
(p. 161 - 171)
In the Evening, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A ship's captain and his supercargo spend an entertaining evening on a Samoan island.
(p. 175 - 181)
The Great Crushing as Mount Sugar-Bag : A Queensland Mining Tale, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A group of miners devise a plan to outwit a dishonest storekeeper to whom they are all heavily in debt.
(p. 185 - 207)
The Shadows of the Dead, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A group of sailors desert from a ship to live amongst the Islanders. However their drunken and violent ways alienate the villagers, who take their revenge when the Islander wife of one of the men dies after he strikes her in a drunken rage.
(p. 211 - 230)
'For We Were Friends Always', Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
Three friends throw themselves over a cliff when the parents of one of the girls, whose lover has died, try to force her into a marriage.
(p. 233 - 241)
Nikoa, Louis Becke , 1896 single work short story
A New Zealand man, left alone on a coconut plantation with his Islander wife and four labourers, plans treachery when the labourers discover a hoard of money,.
(p. 245 - 252)
The Strange White Woman of Maduro, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
An old trader tells the story of a young woman, dying from a gunshot wound to the head, who is abandoned on the island of Majuro by a passing ship.
(p. 255 - 263)
The Obstinacy of Mrs Tatton, Louis Becke , 1895 single work short story
The Islander wife of a ship's captain refuses to let a male doctor attend to her after the birth of her baby.
(p. 267 - 277)
Dr Ludwig Schwalbe, South Sea Savant, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
An injured sailor is put ashore on an isolated island to be tended by a German doctor. The doctor declares he has given up medicine to study the mating behaviour of green turtles. The sailor is terrified when he learns what the doctor is really doing.
(p. 281 - 298)
The Treasure of Don Bruno, Louis Becke , 1897 single work short story
A sailor, imprisoned in Panama after beating a man who had insulted him, is helped to escape by a mysterious Spaniard who wants the sailor's assistance for a special mission.
(p. 301 - 323)

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      T. Fisher Unwin , 1897 .
      Note/s:
      • Has Dedication:

        To my true friend and good comrade, Tom de Wolf, I dedicate these tales. In memory of those olden days when under strange skies we sailed together in weather foul and fair.

        Savage Club,

        London, April, 1896

    • Salem, New Hampshire,
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Ayer , 1977 .
      Edition info: A facsimile edition
      • Publisher: KPI
      London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      KPI , 1987 .
Alternative title: Hvita Maen Och Bruna Kvinnor
Language: Swedish

Works about this Work

Troubled Waters : Australian Spies in the Pacific : Glimpses from the Early Twentieth Century Bruce Bennett , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 209-223)
'This paper traces aspects of intelligence history and culture in the Pacific in the first quarter of the 20th century from an Australian perspective. Following Federation in 1901, Australia began to develop an intelligence capability in the Pacific. This was characterized by small-scale, 'lone ranger' operations by individuals such as William Bridges in places such as German Samoa, New Caledonia and New Guinea. Although a degree of national self-interest was involved, such exercises reinforced Australia's role in the British empire. Coverage extended to Japan before and after the Russo-Japanese war. Over time, the focus on Japan became paramount. Whereas previous activity among colonial possessions in the South Pacific had mainly involved military reconnaissance, Australian intelligence concerning Japan involved more complex, far-reaching strategic considerations. The contributions of Edmund Piesse and writer and scholar James Murdoch gave depth to Australian analyses of Japan during and after the First World War. Their advice brought them into significant conflict with Australian Prime Minister Hughes. This paper suggests that human intelligence benefits from the study of literature, culture and history. Pacific stories such as those of Louis Becke and fictional works set in Japan such as A.G.Hales's Little Blue Pigeon or James Murdoch's stories open the imagination to foreign ways of thinking and feeling. A corollary to this paper is the need for collaborative comparative studies of intelligence cultures and their histories on both sides of the Pacific.' (Author's abstract)
Literature 1898 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Mail , 10 September vol. 66 no. 1992 1898; (p. 643)
Literature 1898 single work column
— Appears in: The Sydney Mail , 10 September vol. 66 no. 1992 1898; (p. 643)
Troubled Waters : Australian Spies in the Pacific : Glimpses from the Early Twentieth Century Bruce Bennett , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Reading Across the Pacific : Australia-United States Intellectual Histories 2010; (p. 209-223)
'This paper traces aspects of intelligence history and culture in the Pacific in the first quarter of the 20th century from an Australian perspective. Following Federation in 1901, Australia began to develop an intelligence capability in the Pacific. This was characterized by small-scale, 'lone ranger' operations by individuals such as William Bridges in places such as German Samoa, New Caledonia and New Guinea. Although a degree of national self-interest was involved, such exercises reinforced Australia's role in the British empire. Coverage extended to Japan before and after the Russo-Japanese war. Over time, the focus on Japan became paramount. Whereas previous activity among colonial possessions in the South Pacific had mainly involved military reconnaissance, Australian intelligence concerning Japan involved more complex, far-reaching strategic considerations. The contributions of Edmund Piesse and writer and scholar James Murdoch gave depth to Australian analyses of Japan during and after the First World War. Their advice brought them into significant conflict with Australian Prime Minister Hughes. This paper suggests that human intelligence benefits from the study of literature, culture and history. Pacific stories such as those of Louis Becke and fictional works set in Japan such as A.G.Hales's Little Blue Pigeon or James Murdoch's stories open the imagination to foreign ways of thinking and feeling. A corollary to this paper is the need for collaborative comparative studies of intelligence cultures and their histories on both sides of the Pacific.' (Author's abstract)
Last amended 24 Jun 2010 13:15:50
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