A Storm in the Mountains single work   poetry   "A lonely Boy, far venturing from his home,"
  • Author: Charles Harpur http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/harpur-charles
Issue Details: First known date: 1856 1856
AustLit is a subscription service. The content and services available here are limited because you have not been recognised as a subscriber. Find out how to gain full access to AustLit

Notes

  • This poem appears in a number of versions from 1856 onwards. For further details, see The Poems of Charles Harpur in Manuscript in the Mitchell Library and in Publication in the Nineteenth Century: An Analytical Finding List by Elizabeth Holt and Elizabeth Perkins (Canberra: Australian Scholarly Editions Centre, 2002).

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

Notes:
Author's note after title: (My first poetical conception.)
Notes:
Author's note at foot of poem: P. S. - With the above, Mr. Empire, I must bid you farewell for a considerable period. I was determined, however, that my poetical stirrup-cup with you, should be something out of the ordinary: and you must even confess, I think, that my bardship has succceded-not in evoking that Chinese Fairy that presides over tempests in teapots-but in conjuring, as it were, into your very editorial sanctum, the Titanic spirit of a mountain storm- with, it is true, a bit of the Peaceful gilding after it, like a shining feathered halcyon. And when I shall see this my last contribution, for a time, set forth in your classic columns (correct to a letter), you would be likely, were you near enough, to catch me, rubbing my hands, and ejaculating the very words of old Dennis the critic-who, it is said, while gloating at some theatrical representation of a tempest, the getting up of which behind the scenes had been his own handiwork, grew all at once unable to contain himself, and began shouting at the top of his voice- "Begad that's my thunder!" C. H.
Notes:
Comprises 159 lines.
  • Appears in:
    y The Empire no. 1722 15 July 1856 Z1728222 1856 newspaper issue 1856 pg. 2
  • Appears in:
    y Australian Poetry Library APRIL; APL; The Australian Poetry Resources Internet Library John Tranter , Sydney : 2004- Z1368099 2004- website

    'The Australian Poetry Library (APL) aims to promote a greater appreciation and understanding of Australian poetry by providing access to a wide range of poetic texts as well as to critical and contextual material relating to them, including interviews, photographs and audio/visual recordings.

    This website currently contains over 42,000 poems, representing the work of more than 170 Australian poets. All the poems are fully searchable, and may be accessed and read freely on the World Wide Web. Readers wishing to download and print poems may do so for a small fee, part of which is returned to the poets via CAL, the Copyright Agency Limited. Teachers, students and readers of Australian poetry can also create personalised anthologies, which can be purchased and downloaded. Print on demand versions will be availabe from Sydney University Press in the near future.

    It is hoped that the APL will encourage teachers to use more Australian material in their English classes, as well as making Australian poetry much more available to readers in remote and regional areas and overseas. It will also help Australian poets, not only by developing new audiences for their work but by allowing them to receive payment for material still in copyright, thus solving the major problem associated with making this material accessible on the Internet.

    The Australian Poetry Library is a joint initiative of the University of Sydney and the Copyright Agency Limited (CAL). Begun in 2004 with a prototype site developed by leading Australian poet John Tranter, the project has been funded by a major Linkage Grant from the Australian Research Council (ARC), CAL and the University of Sydney Library. A team of researchers from the University of Sydney, led by Professor Elizabeth Webby and John Tranter, in association with CAL, have developed the Australian Poetry Library as a permanent and wide-ranging Internet archive of Australian poetry resources.' Source: www.poetrylibrary.edu.au (Sighted 30/05/2011).

    Sydney : 2004-

Works about this Work

The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Writing Up a Storm: Natural Strife and Charles Harpur Adrian Mitchell , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , June vol. 53 no. 2 1993; (p. 90-113)
Charles Harpur's 'The Bush Fire' and 'A Storm in the Mountain' : Sublimity, Cognition and Faith Michael Ackland , 1983 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 43 no. 4 1983; (p. 439-474)
Ackland examines the relationships between nature and mind and between human and supernatural elements in these two poems, arguing that the elements of sublime verse found there are indices of an attempt to connect Edmund Burke's aesthetic of terror with broader moral and national issues.
Charles Harpur's 'The Bush Fire' and 'A Storm in the Mountain' : Sublimity, Cognition and Faith Michael Ackland , 1983 single work criticism biography
— Appears in: Southerly , December vol. 43 no. 4 1983; (p. 439-474)
Ackland examines the relationships between nature and mind and between human and supernatural elements in these two poems, arguing that the elements of sublime verse found there are indices of an attempt to connect Edmund Burke's aesthetic of terror with broader moral and national issues.
Writing Up a Storm: Natural Strife and Charles Harpur Adrian Mitchell , 1993 single work criticism
— Appears in: Southerly , June vol. 53 no. 2 1993; (p. 90-113)
The Ecopoetics of Charles Harpur Cassandra Julie O'Loughlin , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australasian Journal of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology , no. 3 2013;
'Ecopoetics has to do with the realisation of the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. It reflects on what it might mean to dwell with the earth. Before one's country can become accepted as a dwellilng place for the writer's imagination, it must first be discerned, experienced, expressed, and as it were fully engaged. The foreignness of the Australian environment as envisaged by the early European settlers, together with the exploitive ideology of colonialism, proved challenging for colonial writers such as Charles Harpur who felt a sense of connection to the place.This paper examines Harpur's work to determine if it qualifies as ecopoetics as understood in recent studies of literature in relation to the environment. It also seeks to establish his work as a resource for current environmental thinkers, as a point of reference for the consideration of the pre-colonial communicative exchange with this land. His emphasis is on vision: both in a temporal and a transcendental sense.' (Publication abstract)
Last amended 21 Nov 2013 09:16:19
Newspapers:
    Powered by Trove
    X