2221798898811365861.png
This image has been sourced from online.
6241838756100286429.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
6179407750872617367.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
2451937109971219799.jpg
Image courtesy of Penguin Books
4577548656075940128.jpg
Cover image courtesy of publisher.
y Picnic at Hanging Rock single work   novel   historical fiction   mystery  
Issue Details: First known date: 1967 1967
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Adaptations

form y Picnic at Hanging Rock Cliff Green , Australia Adelaide : McElroy and McElroy , 1975 Z822342 1975 single work film/TV mystery horror (taught in 9 units)

On St Valentine's Day 1900, three schoolgirls and a teacher from an exclusive English-style boarding school go missing at the mysterious Hanging Rock in central Victoria. One of the girls is found alive a week later, but the others are never seen again. As morale within the school begins to disintegrate, the headmistress's increasingly incoherent anger is turned towards one student, leading to tragic consequences. Although the police suspect Michael Fitzhubert, a young English aristocrat, and his manservant Albert, who were in the area at the time the girls disappeared, the mystery is never solved. As Paul Byrnes (Australian Screen) notes, the suggested scenarios range from the 'banal and explicable (a crime of passion) to deeply mystical (a crime of nature).'

[Source: Australian Screen]

y Lady Joan Lindsay's Picnic at Hanging Rock : A Full Length Play Laura Annawyn Shamas , Woodstock : Dramatic Publishing Company , 1987 Z818128 1987 single work drama mystery
Picnic at Hanging Rock Tom Wright , 2016 single work drama

'Australia, 1900. An ancient land becomes the site of an impossible mystery. A group of schoolgirls and their teachers venture out into the sundrenched landscape, only for four of their number to disappear forever.

'The subsequent investigation creates more questions than answers. One of the girls is found with no memory of what happened to her or her classmates, another succumbs to hysteria for no apparent reason. Those close to the missing girls begin to meet with unfortunate ends and it becomes clear that this is no ordinary disappearance.' (Production summary)

form y Picnic at Hanging Rock Beatrix Christian , Alice Addison , Australia : Foxtel FremantleMedia Australia , 2017 10020967 2017 series - publisher film/TV historical fiction mystery

Notes

  • Ranked #10 in ABC1's First Tuesday Book Club '10 Aussie Books to Read Before You Die' 2012 voting ballot.
  • Other formats: Also braille, sound recording, large print.

Publication Details of Only Known VersionEarliest 2 Known Versions of

    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Cheshire , 1967 .
      2221798898811365861.png
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 212p.
    • Harmondsworth, Middlesex,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Ringwood, Ringwood - Croydon - Kilsyth area, Melbourne - East, Melbourne, Victoria,: New York (City), New York (State),
      c
      United States of America (USA),
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Ontario,
      c
      Canada,
      c
      Americas,
      :
      Penguin , 1970 .
      Extent: 213p.
      Reprinted: 1975 , 1976 , 1977
    • Adelaide, South Australia,: Rigby , 1975 .
      Extent: 212p.
      ISBN: 0855583649
    • Gladesville, Ryde - Gladesville - Hunters Hill area, Northwest Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales,: Golden Press , 1975 .
      Extent: 212p.
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Viking , 1987 .
      Extent: 204p.
      Description: illus.(some col.), map.
    • Sydney, New South Wales,: Mead & Beckett , 1990 .
      Extent: 204p.
      Description: ill. (some col.), ports.
      ISBN: 0949698407
    • Pymble, Turramurra - Pymble - St Ives area, Sydney Northern Suburbs, Sydney, New South Wales,: Cornstalk Publishing , 1992 .
      Extent: 204p.
      Description: ill., (some col.), map
      ISBN: 0670818283
    • London,
      c
      England,
      c
      c
      United Kingdom (UK),
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Vintage , 1998 .
      Extent: 188p.
      ISBN: 0099750619
    • Kyneton, Kyneton area, Sunbury - Kyneton area, Melbourne, Victoria,: Macedon Ranges Shire Council , 2002 .
      Extent: 219p.
      Limited edition info: Hardcover edition limited to 200 individually numbered copies.
      Description: illus.
      Note/s:
      • With images from the production of Peter Weir's film of the novel and excerpts from the motion picture screenplay by Cliff Green.
      • Issued with an original 16 frame trim from the editing workprint of the film Picnic at Hanging Rock.
      ISBN: 0959941037
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2009 .
      Extent: 192p.
      Note/s:
      • Publication date: 29 June 2009.
      ISBN: 9780143202721
      Series: y Popular Penguins Penguin (publisher), Camberwell : Penguin , 2008- Z1605341 2008 series - publisher novel essay short story
    • Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2013 .
      2451937109971219799.jpg
      Image courtesy of Penguin Books
      Extent: 280p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 20/03/2013
      ISBN: 9780670076857
      Series: y Penguin Australian Children's Classics Melbourne : Penguin , 2012- 6153702 2012 series - publisher children's fiction
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2013 .
      6179407750872617367.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 264p.
      Note/s:
      • Published 20 November 2013
      ISBN: 9780143569732
      Series: Penguin Classics Penguin Books (publisher), series - publisher
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2013 .
      6241838756100286429.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 1vp.
      Note/s:
      • Published 30 January 2013

        Available as an ebook

      ISBN: 9781743480946
      Series: y Popular Penguins Penguin (publisher), Camberwell : Penguin , 2008- Z1605341 2008 series - publisher novel essay short story
    • Camberwell, Camberwell - Kew area, Melbourne - Inner South, Melbourne, Victoria,: Penguin , 2014 .
      4577548656075940128.jpg
      Cover image courtesy of publisher.
      Extent: 192p.
      Note/s:
      • Published: 23/04/2014
      ISBN: 9780734311252
      Series: y Pink Popular Penguin Melbourne : Penguin , 2013 5970429 2013 series - publisher novel
Alternative title: Pique-nique à Hanging Rock
Language: French
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Flammarion , 1976 .
      Extent: 246p.
      ISBN: 2080608797
    • Paris,
      c
      France,
      c
      Western Europe, Europe,
      :
      Livre de Poche , 2016 .
      3074715151667892072.jpeg
      This image has been sourced from online.
      Extent: 318p.p.
      ISBN: 9782253068976, 2253068977

Works about this Work

y Beyond the Rock : The Life of Joan Lindsay and the Mystery of Picnic at Hanging Rock Janelle McCulloch , Richmond : Echo Publishing , 2017 10185904 2017 single work biography
26 Aussie Books You Must Read Blanche Clark , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Courier-Mail , 24 January 2015; (p. 18-19)
'With Australia Day upons us...26 great Australian Books that have helped shape and define our nation...'
Read All About It Sarah Nicholson , 2015 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Mail , 31 May 2015; (p. 22)
Contrasting Cultural Landscapes in Peter Weir's Film Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) Based on Jan Lindsay's 1967 Novel with the Same Title Holmqvist Jytte , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Coolabah , no. 11 2013; (p. 25-35)
'The following essay explores the relationship between contrasting cultures and cultural spaces within a rural Australian, Victorian, context, with reference to the narrated cultural landscape in Joan Lindsay's novel Picnic at Hanging Rock (1967) and in the film based on the novel, by Peter Weir (1975). In the analysis of the five first scenes of the film, the focus will be on the notion of scenic- and human- beauty that is at once arresting and foreboding, and the various contrasting and parallel spaces that characterise the structure of book and film. The article will draw from a number of additional secondary sources, including various cultural readings which offer alternative methodological approaches to the works analysed, and recorded 1970s interviews with the author and the filmmaker.' (Author's abstract)
Celebrating Great Australian Writing : First Tuesday Book Club 2013 single work column
— Appears in: InCite , 1 January vol. 34 no. 1/2 2013; (p. 18-20)
Scaling the Rock : Joan Lindsay's Picnic at Hanging Rock Catherine Padmore , 2013 single work criticism
— Appears in: Telling Stories : Australian Life and Literature 1935–2012 2013; (p. 274-280)
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Students Make a Picnic out of a Bush Classic Elisabeth Tarica , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 20 February 2012; (p. 12)
The Rock and the Void : Pastoral and Loss in Joan Lindsay’s Picnic at Hanging Rock and Peter Weir’s Film Adaptation Victoria Bladen , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Colloquy : Text Theory Critique , August no. 23 2012; (p. 160-184)
'Picnic at Hanging Rock is a significant phenomenon of the Australian cultural landscape, comprising Joan Lindsay's 1967 novel, Peter Weir's 1975 film adaptation5 and the paratexts that surround text and film, such as urban mythology, interviews with participants (which accompany the director's cut edition) and the 1987 publication of Lindsay's The Secret of Hanging Rock, the final chapter edited out from the original book. Picnic explores the idea of an intense human encounter in natural space, and the sense of mystery and experience of loss surrounding this. Given these elements, the pastoral mode is a valuable lens through which to approach Lindsay's and Weir's works.' (p. 160)
The Hanging Rock Piper: Weir, Lindsay, and the Spectral Fluidity of Nothing Saviour Catania , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Literature/Film Quarterly , vol. 40 no. 2 2012; (p. 84-95)
The Rock Hopper Kay Readdy , 2012 single work short story
— Appears in: Hecate , vol. 38 no. 1 & 2 2012; (p. 47-51)
Fixated on the Footsteps of Miranda John Elder , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 2 January 2011; (p. 5)
Children of the Apocalypse Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 108-134)

This chapter explores apocalypse in children's literature with reference to literary attitudes to children, nature and dystopia. Examinations of works by Lee Harding, Victor Kelleher, and John Marsden then focus on how these writers adapt apocalyptic themes for a juvenile audience. Their novels display tyranny, large-scale catastrophe, invasion, and children in danger, and their apocalyptic settings reveal anxieties about isolation, invasion, Indigenous land rights and colonization. (108)

Three Lost Children : Revisiting a Heroic Legend Nonie Sharp , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 69 no. 3 2010; (p. 132-141)
'The theme of lost children in literature and in life took a firm hold of people's imaginations in early colonial Australia. 'Lost Child', a poem of lament for a child 'taken' by the bush, published in 1826, is perhaps the first on that subject in Australian literature. The lost child as an enduring theme found exquisite expression in Frederick McCubbin's 1886 painting of that name. The bush inspired both fear and fascination in settlers. Its haunting, even hostile character found a place in popular culture well into the twentieth century and the novel Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsay, at one time a student of McCubbin, continues to exert a tragic appeal even today.' (p. 134)
Time Without Clocks or ‘Repeat Pattern’ at Hanging Rock? : Joan Lindsay at the Lyceum Club in 1956 Terence O'Neill , 2010 single work criticism

'The pattern [which] had begun to form...was still spreading; still fanning out in depth and intensity, still incomplete ... Unaware of their allotted places in the general scheme of joy and sorrow, light and shade [they] went about their personal affairs as usual, unconsciously weaving and interweaving the individual threads of their private lives into the complex tapestry of the whole' (Picnic at Hanging Rock).

In 1956 Joan Lindsay gave a talk at the Lyceum Club in Melbourne entitled 'Repeat Pattern'. This talk is now completely forgotten, yet it is significant in the development of her thought. In her talk she explained the concept of 'repeat pattern' as follows: 'I believe that the pattern of every human life is like any other pattern, containing at ever recurring intervals what the designer of textiles calls a REPEAT. When the Repeat occurs the design resolves itself and begins all over again, thus fulfilling the original rhythm with which it began. Inch by inch, yard by yard, the pattern of the woven material takes shape. Hour by hour, day by day, the intricate and less easily recognizable tapestry of human life is worked out. The repeat is often at long intervals, often disguised in the complexity of the whole, but it is always there.'

This is almost certainly the first time that Joan Lindsay set down her philosophy on the relationship between human life and time - something she would develop initially in her book of autobiographical reminiscences Time Without Clocks, but especially in Picnic at Hanging Rock.
Since the publication in 1967 of the novel, and especially since the release of the film in 1975, the disappearance of three schoolgirls and their teacher, Miss McCraw, on Hanging Rock on St Valentine's Day 1900 has become a puzzle which many people have tried to solve - there have even been two books published on the subject. Hitherto those trying to solve the puzzle have concentrated mainly on events in the book or film. In this talk I approach the mystery from a different perspective, by looking at a few relevant events in Joan Lindsay's life up to 1956, and also by examining some things of importance to her. What I have chosen are pieces of a 'repeat pattern', which I believe will provide an insight not only into Joan's thinking, but also throw some light on what happened at Hanging Rock on that fateful day in 1900.


The pieces of the 'repeat pattern' which are examined in some detail are:
(a) The role of St Valentine's Day in Joan Lindsay's life
(b) Her friendship with her cousin Martin Boyd (q.v.).
(c) Two strange encounters with nuns which left a lasting impression on her.
(d) A mystery ship or two.
(e) People in an alien landscape, and two paintings at the National Gallery of Victoria.
(f) An article by a Miss McCraw, a teacher at Clyde School, in The Cluthan, the Clyde School magazine.
(g) clocks and watches that stop.
Putting these pieces of the pattern together provides an important clue as to what happened at Hanging Rock - at least on the literal level.

Yet I believe that the novel also has a (hitherto unnoticed) allegorical level, which can be accessed through a knowledge of events in Joan Lindsay's life in the years between the two world wars. During those years she experienced great suffering and sorrow, consisting of the loss of most members of her immediate family and the end of her career as an artist. Her response was a gradual development of an almost mystical view of life, the seeds of which had been planted at quite an early age. This mystical view is expressed in Picnic at Hanging Rock through the character of Miranda, in particular. Through her, Joan Lindsay is in a sense present at Hanging Rock, present with the picnic party. She later commented: 'To me it all happened, it was all terribly real for me'. Writing the book and thereby being present at the Rock was for her a 'repeat pattern', a re-experiencing of events which had caused her profound grief three decades earlier (Author's abstract).
Fear and Loathing in the Australian Bush : Gothic Landscapes in Bush Studies and Picnic at Hanging Rock Kathleen Steele , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Colloquy : Text Theory Critique , December no. 20 2010;
This work is an 'analysis of two texts in which the representations of landscape have been overlooked in favour of feminist or classical readings: Barbara Baynton‟s Bush Studies and Joan Lindsay‟s Picnic at Hanging Rock. If "landscape'. (Author's introduction)
You are out of Time Adrian Mitchell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Change - Conflict and Convergence : Austral-Asian Scenarios 2010; (p. 166-175)
Joan Lindsay : A Time for Everything Terence O'Neill , 2009 single work biography
— Appears in: The La Trobe Journal , May no. 83 2009; (p. 41-55)
A detailed biographical study of Joan Lindsay, with new insights to the background behind Lindsay's novel Picnic at Haning Rock.
The Outback Pablo Armellino , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ob-Scene Spaces in Australian Narrative : An Account of the Socio-Topographic Construction of Space in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 57-188)
y Forty Memories Abbey's Bookshop Catalogue; Anthology of Forty Memories 1968-2008 Sydney : Abbey's Bookshop , 2008 Z1562239 2008 anthology poetry This work is comprised of short works by staff and customers. It includes details of the business of bookselling as well as more personal accounts of the relationship between reader and bookshop. The section 'Our Customers' has short essays from customers including Campion (on Keneally's Three Cheers...), Wilding and Chris Puplick. Also includes lists of 40 favourite books from members of the Abbey family and senior staff.
New Fiction Martha Lemming , 1968 single work review
— Appears in: Australian Book Review , March vol. 7 no. 5 1968; (p. 88)

— Review of An Affair of Clowns : Short Stories and Sketches Thelma Forshaw 1967 selected work short story ; Dynasty Tony Morphett 1967 single work novel ; Picnic at Hanging Rock Joan Lindsay 1967 single work novel
Sunlit Mystery 1967 single work review
— Appears in: The Bulletin , 9 December vol. 89 no. 4579 1967; (p. 82)

— Review of Picnic at Hanging Rock Joan Lindsay 1967 single work novel
Untitled Scrutarius , 1968 single work review
— Appears in: Walkabout , vol. 34 no. 3 1968; (p. 45-46)

— Review of Picnic at Hanging Rock Joan Lindsay 1967 single work novel
Picnicking with E. M. Forster, Joan Lindsay et.al. Donald Barrett , 1987 single work criticism
— Appears in: LiNQ , vol. 15 no. 1 1987; (p. 79-86)
Between the Rock and a Dark Place Rachel Wells , 2005 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 14 February 2005; (p. 4)
True Fakes Simon Caterson , 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Eureka Street , March-April vol. 16 no. 2 2006; (p. 34-35)
150 Years 150 Books 150 Words 600 Entries 10 Winners Lili Wilkinson , 2004 single work column
— Appears in: The Newsletter of the Australian Centre for Youth Literature , October no. 3 2004; (p. 8-12)
The aim of the Save This Book competition was to nominate a book from the last 150 years, from a list of 150 titles, and explain why (in 150 words) why it should be saved from a tidal wave. Winners' submissions are included.
Hanging Rock, desafiante misterio 2006 single work criticism
— Appears in: Hontanar , March no. 84 2006; (p. 2-3)
The Invisible Foundation Stone John Taylor , 1987 single work essay
— Appears in: The Secret of Hanging Rock : Joan Lindsay's Final Chapter 1987; (p. [7]-18)
Picnic at Hanging Rock : Joan Lindsay (1896-1984) Jane Gleeson-White , 2007 single work criticism
— Appears in: Australian Classics : Fifty Great Writers and Their Celebrated Works 2007; (p. 131-135)
Artemis in South Australia : Classical Allusions in Picnic at Hanging Rock K. V. Hartigan , 1990 single work criticism
— Appears in: Classical & Modern Literature , vol. 11 no. 1 1990; (p. 93-98)
y Forty Memories Abbey's Bookshop Catalogue; Anthology of Forty Memories 1968-2008 Sydney : Abbey's Bookshop , 2008 Z1562239 2008 anthology poetry This work is comprised of short works by staff and customers. It includes details of the business of bookselling as well as more personal accounts of the relationship between reader and bookshop. The section 'Our Customers' has short essays from customers including Campion (on Keneally's Three Cheers...), Wilding and Chris Puplick. Also includes lists of 40 favourite books from members of the Abbey family and senior staff.
Joan Lindsay's Picnic at Hanging Rock: A Fortieth Anniversary Retrospect James Doig , Brett McKenzie , Patrick Lee , 2008 single work criticism
— Appears in: Studies in Australian Weird Fiction , no. 1 2008; (p. 171-183)
The authors provide personal insights and interpretations of the novel never before discussed.
Joan Lindsay : A Time for Everything Terence O'Neill , 2009 single work biography
— Appears in: The La Trobe Journal , May no. 83 2009; (p. 41-55)
A detailed biographical study of Joan Lindsay, with new insights to the background behind Lindsay's novel Picnic at Haning Rock.
The Outback Pablo Armellino , 2009 single work criticism
— Appears in: Ob-Scene Spaces in Australian Narrative : An Account of the Socio-Topographic Construction of Space in Australian Literature 2009; (p. 57-188)
Three Lost Children : Revisiting a Heroic Legend Nonie Sharp , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Meanjin , Spring vol. 69 no. 3 2010; (p. 132-141)
'The theme of lost children in literature and in life took a firm hold of people's imaginations in early colonial Australia. 'Lost Child', a poem of lament for a child 'taken' by the bush, published in 1826, is perhaps the first on that subject in Australian literature. The lost child as an enduring theme found exquisite expression in Frederick McCubbin's 1886 painting of that name. The bush inspired both fear and fascination in settlers. Its haunting, even hostile character found a place in popular culture well into the twentieth century and the novel Picnic at Hanging Rock by Joan Lindsay, at one time a student of McCubbin, continues to exert a tragic appeal even today.' (p. 134)
Fixated on the Footsteps of Miranda John Elder , 2011 single work column
— Appears in: The Sunday Age , 2 January 2011; (p. 5)
Time Without Clocks or ‘Repeat Pattern’ at Hanging Rock? : Joan Lindsay at the Lyceum Club in 1956 Terence O'Neill , 2010 single work criticism

'The pattern [which] had begun to form...was still spreading; still fanning out in depth and intensity, still incomplete ... Unaware of their allotted places in the general scheme of joy and sorrow, light and shade [they] went about their personal affairs as usual, unconsciously weaving and interweaving the individual threads of their private lives into the complex tapestry of the whole' (Picnic at Hanging Rock).

In 1956 Joan Lindsay gave a talk at the Lyceum Club in Melbourne entitled 'Repeat Pattern'. This talk is now completely forgotten, yet it is significant in the development of her thought. In her talk she explained the concept of 'repeat pattern' as follows: 'I believe that the pattern of every human life is like any other pattern, containing at ever recurring intervals what the designer of textiles calls a REPEAT. When the Repeat occurs the design resolves itself and begins all over again, thus fulfilling the original rhythm with which it began. Inch by inch, yard by yard, the pattern of the woven material takes shape. Hour by hour, day by day, the intricate and less easily recognizable tapestry of human life is worked out. The repeat is often at long intervals, often disguised in the complexity of the whole, but it is always there.'

This is almost certainly the first time that Joan Lindsay set down her philosophy on the relationship between human life and time - something she would develop initially in her book of autobiographical reminiscences Time Without Clocks, but especially in Picnic at Hanging Rock.
Since the publication in 1967 of the novel, and especially since the release of the film in 1975, the disappearance of three schoolgirls and their teacher, Miss McCraw, on Hanging Rock on St Valentine's Day 1900 has become a puzzle which many people have tried to solve - there have even been two books published on the subject. Hitherto those trying to solve the puzzle have concentrated mainly on events in the book or film. In this talk I approach the mystery from a different perspective, by looking at a few relevant events in Joan Lindsay's life up to 1956, and also by examining some things of importance to her. What I have chosen are pieces of a 'repeat pattern', which I believe will provide an insight not only into Joan's thinking, but also throw some light on what happened at Hanging Rock on that fateful day in 1900.


The pieces of the 'repeat pattern' which are examined in some detail are:
(a) The role of St Valentine's Day in Joan Lindsay's life
(b) Her friendship with her cousin Martin Boyd (q.v.).
(c) Two strange encounters with nuns which left a lasting impression on her.
(d) A mystery ship or two.
(e) People in an alien landscape, and two paintings at the National Gallery of Victoria.
(f) An article by a Miss McCraw, a teacher at Clyde School, in The Cluthan, the Clyde School magazine.
(g) clocks and watches that stop.
Putting these pieces of the pattern together provides an important clue as to what happened at Hanging Rock - at least on the literal level.

Yet I believe that the novel also has a (hitherto unnoticed) allegorical level, which can be accessed through a knowledge of events in Joan Lindsay's life in the years between the two world wars. During those years she experienced great suffering and sorrow, consisting of the loss of most members of her immediate family and the end of her career as an artist. Her response was a gradual development of an almost mystical view of life, the seeds of which had been planted at quite an early age. This mystical view is expressed in Picnic at Hanging Rock through the character of Miranda, in particular. Through her, Joan Lindsay is in a sense present at Hanging Rock, present with the picnic party. She later commented: 'To me it all happened, it was all terribly real for me'. Writing the book and thereby being present at the Rock was for her a 'repeat pattern', a re-experiencing of events which had caused her profound grief three decades earlier (Author's abstract).
Fear and Loathing in the Australian Bush : Gothic Landscapes in Bush Studies and Picnic at Hanging Rock Kathleen Steele , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Colloquy : Text Theory Critique , December no. 20 2010;
This work is an 'analysis of two texts in which the representations of landscape have been overlooked in favour of feminist or classical readings: Barbara Baynton‟s Bush Studies and Joan Lindsay‟s Picnic at Hanging Rock. If "landscape'. (Author's introduction)
You are out of Time Adrian Mitchell , 2010 single work criticism
— Appears in: Change - Conflict and Convergence : Austral-Asian Scenarios 2010; (p. 166-175)
The Australian Horror Novel Since 1950 James Doig , 2012 single work criticism
— Appears in: Sold by the Millions : Australia's Bestsellers 2012; (p. 112-127)
According to James Doig the horror genre 'was overlooked by the popular circulating libraries in Australia.' In this chapter he observes that this 'marginalization of horror reflects both the trepidation felt by the conservative library system towards 'penny dreadfuls,' and the fact that horror had limited popular appeal with the British (and Australian) reading public.' Doig concludes that there is 'no Australian author of horror novels with the same commercial cachet' as authors of fantasy or science fiction. He proposes that if Australian horror fiction wants to compete successfully 'in the long-term it needs to develop a flourishing and vibrant small press contingent prepared to nurture new talent' like the USA and UK small presses.' (Editor's foreword xii)
Students Make a Picnic out of a Bush Classic Elisabeth Tarica , 2012 single work column
— Appears in: The Age , 20 February 2012; (p. 12)
Children of the Apocalypse Roslyn Weaver , 2011 single work criticism
— Appears in: Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film : A Critical Study 2011; (p. 108-134)

This chapter explores apocalypse in children's literature with reference to literary attitudes to children, nature and dystopia. Examinations of works by Lee Harding, Victor Kelleher, and John Marsden then focus on how these writers adapt apocalyptic themes for a juvenile audience. Their novels display tyranny, large-scale catastrophe, invasion, and children in danger, and their apocalyptic settings reveal anxieties about isolation, invasion, Indigenous land rights and colonization. (108)

Last amended 16 Nov 2016 08:54:06
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